I Like My Rv Because....

Discussion in 'General Community Discussions' started by DXSMac, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. DXSMac

    DXSMac
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    For the newbies to RV'ing, how about stating why you selected your particluar RV? I'm not talking about company (Fleetwood versus Forest River), just model (Class A, Class B, Class C, TT, Camper, 5th Wheel, tent, pop up, etc...)

    Ok, I started RV'ing on a whim. I was mad, hated my job, angry, wanted something good. I saw an RV on the road, and out of the blue, I HAD TO HAVE ONE and I bought one within 2 days. My first one was a 24 foot Class C (It was Fleetwood, but that doesn't matter.)

    Ok, so why did I pick a Class C? Well, to me, they just looked "cool." Class A's, to me, were "too big, too much RV."

    One year later, I traded my Fleetwood for a Forest River Class C. So, why did I stick with Class C still?

    Well, I like the overhead bed area. I can stuff junk up there, shut the curtain, and no one is wiser. (Of course, when I travel, I have to pull it all down....) Also, my cat loves the overhead. Having something to "jump" to, gives my cat exercise in the RV. I have an "arch of bristles" that my cat just loves! I make sure I bring the bristles, put it in the overhead, and kitty jumps up there, gets under the "arch of bristles" and looks down on his "kingdom." I currently have a 30 foot. However, I still like the style of Class C. To me, a 30 foot Class A is just..... "too much" RV. I feel dwarfed in the driving area. I feel like I can't reach the steering wheel and can't touch the gas pedal. Ok, this is in my head, but that's how I feel about a Class A.

    Actually, I considered a Class B, but when I found out Class B's were more costly per square foot, I went Class C.

    And, I prefer RV to Camper, because I want to reserve the right to eventually "full time" in it. I did try it for 8 months..... so I know I can!

    Now, the drawback is..... you are stuck once you park the RV. Some people tow a car, I'm too CHICKEN to do that! So, I carry an electric scooter (www.egovehicles.com, if anyone is interested....). It serves me well, don't need a license for it, and as long as I can go a short distance to the store, works for me!

    Also, if you are too chicken to pull a car, Enterprise Rent A Car brings the car to you, if there is one of those at your location. That's an option. I have thought about full-timing in a place that has an Enterprise, then just... NOT have a car.

    JJ
     
  2. Bud in Florida

    Bud in Florida
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    I currently own a Class A. In the past I have had a TT, a fifth wheel, a class C and another Class A. I have come to the conclusion that if you are going to go some place and stay a long time, a fifth wheel is the best to spend a lot of time in-- for traveling down the road, I like a Class A. Like being up high and am getting too old to climb up to the overhead bed. But the Class C I had was great when we had kids.
     
  3. dmsscs

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    We started in a tent, for years that was good enough, then we spent a five night Memorial Day that rained every single day. Die hards that we are, we stuck it out, but decided to buy a pop-up to get us off the floor in the rain. Then the kids grew up and we went seasonal and bought our first travel trailer. That served us well for about 10 years. Next we had a small 5th. wheel, Then we got our first drive model, a class c, and it was nice to have the over head sleeper espcially because our kids still travel with us, even better to have the bathroom available even as we drove so my husband didn't have to announce every rest stop he saw. BUT we had a sesaonal business and could only travel in the winter and the Class C did not have a heated basement and our water lines would freeze up on the way home, so we traded-in for a Class A and were hooked. I wouldn't go back to any of the others. We are actually looking to trade up to a diesel, maybe a little bigger. Only problem is our kids still travel with us and now they have families, too. Some of the newer ones are designed for families, we even saw one with bunk beds and another with a two story bedroom. We do not tow a vehicle, we rent when we get where we are going. I don't know if it is cheaper or not, but we only pay for that car when we need it, no insurance, no car payment no property taxes on it. I would imagine towing a vehicle must cut down the already terrible mileage. We did see a class A towing a car, towing a boat. That must have given him about 2 miles a gallon. :lol:
     
  4. John S.

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    towing a car is not an issue just take a short tirip the first time. It is not hard you just have to think ahead when pulling into an area so you can get out without unhooking everything.
     
  5. Texasrvers

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    We owned a very small class C back in the early '80's. It was fine for us back then, but the whole thing would probably fit in the bedroom of the class A we have now. We only had the class C for about 3 years, and then we didn't have another RV until we retired in 2000. We planned to travel a lot so we wanted something that had lots of room. Both class A's and 5th wheels had plenty of room inside, but we felt the class A's had more storage underneath. (Those of you with 5ers feel free to tell me I'm wrong.) Also we travel with animals, and we did not want to have to take them out of the RV and put them in another vehicle, and then back in the RV, etc. Likewise we did not want to leave one vehicle and get in the other when we stopped for lunch or a bathroom break. We tow a car so we have a vehicle to run around in once we get to our destination. That is another reason we chose a class A. When we are towing a car we get 8-9 mpg in the motor home. We hear that trucks pulling a large RV get around 10-11 mpg. (That's according to our neighbor who tows a 5th wheel.) That is only slightly better than our class A. However, once we unhook we get 22mpg in the car, and the truck still gets less than 15 mpg. There are some really nice 5th wheels out there, but we still think the class A was the right choice for us.
     
  6. DXSMac

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    QUOTE(dmsscs @ Oct 31 2007, 08:50 PM) [snapback]8965[/snapback]

    BUT we had a sesaonal business and could only travel in the winter and the Class C did not have a heated basement and our water lines would freeze up on the way home, so we traded-in for a Class A and were hooked.


    Ok, I have to agree with you about the lack of heated basement in Class C. I fulltimed in my Class C for 8 months, and part of that 8 months went during the winter. That floor was cold! :eek: I also experienced frozen water lines. But I'm glad I did it, now I know what to expect and how to get around it.

    Oh, first time you use your RV in very cold weather, go to a GOOD, highly rated RV Resort, with staff that can help you out. (I was at Horn Rapids RV Resort in Richland, WA) This way, you learn stuff and someone (even another RV'r) can help you out if you have a problem. Then you know what to expect and how to overcome it.

    JJ
     
  7. Butch

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    We started camping in a small three man pup tent and continued to use it for five years. Those times were our best, we had more fun and enjoyed the experience with less. Then the upgrades started. We then purchased a small used 15' TT, which we used for one camping season. The Rv bug had bitten us and we were off to Rv shows, visiting local dealers, and talking to others we knew had Rvs. The next in line was a 26' 5th wheel, we thought we were in heaven, we travel about and enjoyed the unit for a number of years without much trouble. Then we upgraded to the big time with a hardly used 36' 5th wheel with two slides. The owners used it 6 months and the husband had passed on, and we purchased it. This 5th wheel was plagued with problems--pure trouble, constant repairs after having use it each time out. After three years we traded it for our present class A 37' foot motorhome with two slides. The motor home does not have the interior space that the 36' 5th wheel had, but is comfortable, warm/cool, dry and at this time fits our needs. We tow dolly an auto, that gets 31 mpg, so upon arrival we travel about at a good mpg. The motorhome gets about 8 mpg. The wife, and myself, like the availability of being able to get refreshments, use the facilities while going down the road. The wife has also attended driving classes to acquaint and gain confidence in the ability to drive the motorhome. She does a great job of moving down the road safely. The 36' 5th wheel was bad for trying to find a pull off spot so that the wife could use the bathroom facilities. Total length was 51+ feet long and over 20,000 lbs total. We like the convenience of the class A motorhome in its appointments on the exterior and on the interior, plus at our ages now, this is our "camping". We remember our early days, with the tent, fondly, and only hope that the motorhome days will be the same. We are always looking to upgrade, but have found little to compare to what we now have to make that next step up, and of course at what price.
     
  8. HappiestCamper

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    Have always tent camped since I was a kid, and this continued into marriage and then the kids (got all of them into a tent by 6 months of age). After one week where it rained constantly, started looking to get a pop up. Found a hybrid Keystone that was 2 years old, but the dealer had never sold it. It was cheaper than any new pop up, so I feel we got a great bargain.

    Next will be to move up to a bigger TT that isn't a hybrid. Sleeping in those canvas topped rooms, you might as well be in a tent with the noise from outside. Since I have a wife, 3 kids, and a big dog, I'm not interested in a fifth wheel - prefer to pull with my Suburban so extra people can go with us. Not interested in a MH at this point, as I don't want the maintenance of an engine that will not be used 90% of the year - plus I always have a vehicle with me when I unhitch the TT.

    Now, in 15-20 years when the kids have moved out and we are retired, I may become interested in these two options as we'll be able to take long trips for most (if not all) of the year. I'm sure we'll pick the option that works best with grandkids then.

    Whole family was in trailer last weekend - next weekend me and the two cub scouts will be crammed into a tent - both are fun!
     
  9. RLM

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    QUOTE(Bud in Florida @ Oct 31 2007, 06:08 PM) [snapback]8963[/snapback]

    I currently own a Class A. In the past I have had a TT, a fifth wheel, a class C and another Class A. I have come to the conclusion that if you are going to go some place and stay a long time, a fifth wheel is the best to spend a lot of time in-- for traveling down the road, I like a Class A. Like being up high and am getting too old to climb up to the overhead bed. But the Class C I had was great when we had kids.



    Bud> I've had the same experience with different RVs. I couldn't agree with you more. I actually now own both a MH and a C. The MH is for traveling when I work camp alot and the C is for going where I can't get the big rig and just want to commune with the squirrels.
     
  10. BBear

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    The first camper I recall going camping in that we had was an Apache pop-up, very bare bones...just two beds and we made cabinets to fit inside of it. It was easy to put up and easy to tow, but then we decided to "upgrade" so we got a Starcraft pop-up that had a stove and icebox and electricity in it and loved that, but then we decided to go with a pop up truck camper which was nice, but not very comfortable inside.

    So, then we went on the motorhome binge where we had a Class A first, which I found not too enticing to drive, so we then went with two Class C Jayco's which were nice, but they posed more problems than I could handle with water heaters and such not working, leaking, etc...plus since we didn't tow a car or anything it got to be a hassle about once we got somewhere if we wanted to go out sightseeing we had to unhook everything each time we wanted to go out.

    So, then we went back to "roughing it" bought a cabin tent about 10 years ago and still have it and use it...only problem is with weather...I hate planning going somewhere and it's raining when we have to put it up, but once it's up and it rains, I love sitting in it listening to the rain and have never had a leak...yet.

    I'm hooked on tent camping when we can forecast the weather correctly, LOL... plus it's nice because we have the car to go out and sightsee and go where we want without having to unhook anything.

    And, as of lately, we've also started to stay in the camping cabins and cottages campgrounds offer...it's nice to just throw a few things in the car and go and not have to worry about setting up or hooking up or anything.

    I liked camping in motorhomes and campers, but now I can honestly say if given the choice, I'd rather camp in a tent or cabin.

    I think all types of camping modes have their good points and bad points...and it comes down to personal preference as to which you like the most.

    I'm just happy more people are camping as opposed to vacationing and/or traveling and staying in hotels and motels...I don't think there is anything better than staying and relaxing in a campground...plus, for some reason, I always find fellow campers to be more respectful and friendly as opposed to those who stay in hotels/motels.
     
  11. DXSMac

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    QUOTE(BBear @ Nov 2 2007, 10:38 AM) [snapback]8991[/snapback]

    I'm just happy more people are camping as opposed to vacationing and/or traveling and staying in hotels and motels...I don't think there is anything better than staying and relaxing in a campground...plus, for some reason, I always find fellow campers to be more respectful and friendly as opposed to those who stay in hotels/motels.




    BBear, tent camping is wonderful when it's not 20 degrees outside, LOL! Also, I am loving the RV thing as opposed to hotels. The only drawback is "setting up." Takes me an hour (gotta level on Lynx Blocks, hook up elect water sewer and cable TV, turn on the propane, undo the stove vent, then program both TV's). In hotels, it's all there for you, but that's ok, I don't miss hotels. State Parks are easier, don't have to hook up cable, and most of the time, don't have to hook up sewer.

    BBear, were you the one that lives close to Shanksville? I'm too lazy to go back and reread the posts, I was trying to remember for future reference, because I want to go to Shanksville some day.

    JJ
     
  12. John S.

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    Well, were to start. I am pretty new to RVing as I have only been doing it for 5 years but I had 15 years on boats so i just changed boat to RV and decided what to buy. I decided I wanted to RV then I looked at all the options. I decided that I wanted something that I could use with my dogs too. So I looked at RVs started with lookinga t a truck camper sliding into the bed of my pickup since I already had a big diesel truck. NO too small for me. so then I went and looked at TT. It was too long and not enough storage adn I wanted a generator for said dogs so then I went to 5th wheel. It had a generator but it wa s32 feet long and then the tow vehicle so I decided I needed a Motorhome but what kind. I settled on a DP and here is why:


    Easy of driving
    power and longevity of drive train in a diesel
    air ride
    diesel generator
    storage and carring capacity.
    ease of set up when I get there (air leveling and hose and electric reels)
    Visability
    and convience of using it on the road when ever I want where ever I fit.
    heated bays and sub zero capability

    Now that fit part
    I loved using the Class A so much I also have a smaller unit
    no leveling with air but ahve a motorhome in the size package of my 3500 dually and love it
    can get into the city DC and see the sights run th e skyline drive
    have a bathroom in the coach and carry water and electic in one unit


    Now you know I like it alot. I have put on over 160,000 miles on the class A foretravels and have put on only a few thousand on the bornfree but then again it is only a month or two old.
     
  13. BBear

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    QUOTE(DXSMac @ Nov 2 2007, 08:51 PM) [snapback]8995[/snapback]

    BBear, tent camping is wonderful when it's not 20 degrees outside, LOL! Also, I am loving the RV thing as opposed to hotels. The only drawback is "setting up." Takes me an hour (gotta level on Lynx Blocks, hook up elect water sewer and cable TV, turn on the propane, undo the stove vent, then program both TV's). In hotels, it's all there for you, but that's ok, I don't miss hotels. State Parks are easier, don't have to hook up cable, and most of the time, don't have to hook up sewer.

    BBear, were you the one that lives close to Shanksville? I'm too lazy to go back and reread the posts, I was trying to remember for future reference, because I want to go to Shanksville some day.

    JJ



    I didn't mean to diss hotels/motels, LOL, it's just a preference I have for camping over them, but we do on occasion stay at hotels/motels, especially when we frequent Ocean City, MD and the Outer Banks as we did this past year, mainly because the Northern Outer Banks don't exactly have a plethora of campgrounds to stay at.

    We've done some tent camping in the late Fall/early Winter when it got to below 20 degrees at times...the key is sub-zero sleeping bags and a nice warm fire, LOL. Talk about having the place to yourself...at times we were the only campers in the park...a lot different than the summer months.

    And, yes, I'm the one who lives near Shanksville...like I said before, if there's anything I can help you with, just let me know, I'd be happy to help you out. :)
     
  14. Gracie & Chloe

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    We started out in a tent 40 years ago, the same tent my folks started me in 55 years ago. We graduated to a Coleman tent trailer when the boys got a little older. We gave up camping for several years when we spent the summers "horsing". A few years ago we bought a 27' TT, and we were hooked again. We traded that for a 36' 5th wheel and started full-timing. The 5th wheel was perfect for full-timing because of all the room. Since giving up full-timing, we will next have a Class C with at least 2 slides. The Class C, in my opinion, will give us the ease of traveling in comfort with all the amenities right there and still have enough room to spend 2 to 3 months out without feeling too crowded.
     
  15. John Blue

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    We spent more than a year looking at RV equipment, RV shows, and talking to RV people. We checked everything about this type of life. We come up with a class A only would best work for our needs. Them we spent next year working on all the class A's we could buy. At end of that time Foretravel had everything you would need for the right price. Them we looked at tow cars wheel down only. The Honda CRV was the best in class and trouble free.

    Here we are years latter and we have Foretravel and Honda yet. Only RV equipment we own to date and we plan to run it for years to come yet. Cost lots of money to keep on buying new equipment every couple years. Cost lots of dollars first time only.

    We are very happy with our equipment and see "John S" list for all the great items we have to work with. Great RV to travel in and see the USA. We are very happy! :p
     
  16. Lucille Moulton

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    We have a 37' class A motor home. We do not have a small car to tow. I would have like a pull-a-long or a fifth wheel. With a pull-along or fifth wheel you don't have spent money every 6 or 7 year to buy a new one, you also have a car. We have a 1997 30' Coachman class C that I like very much because I could drive it. Now my husband does all the driving. I try it I was all over the road. This one is way to big. Went it was time to leave I would take it shopping instant of my car.
    I did not know that you could call Enterprise Rent Car for a car. I do like my sliders.
     
  17. Holiday Rambling

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    Travel trailer fan here. We just keep trading up in size and quality. Our new trailer is 34' with 2 slides and we love it. Have friends that owned a 34' 5th wheel version of our lay-out and the only difference was the outside storage. We tow with a 2007 3/4 ton GMC HD Sierra Truck with the Duramax - Allison Transmission. We average 12.6 mpg towing. We like the fact that we have our vehicle to run around in and for us a TT fits best.

    Everyone's wants and needs are different and one should choose what suits them best. There's positives and negatives with each model out there. We too started in a tent then went into a pop-up and then into various lengths of TT's. HAPPY RVing Everyone!!
     
  18. Homer

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    I started over 50 years ago in a tent, then bought a Ford econoline, converted it myself and came off the back double doors with a large tent. The kids loved this arrangement. Then went to a pop up camper, pulled with the van. Lots of room, easy to tow, but dreary in wet weather/cold weather. I graduated, if you will, to a 16 ft trailer, single axle, 3 way power, gas,elect,and battery. Even had propane operated lights for really boondocking. Then the next 3 were larger and larger trailers pulled with large p.u. trucks. Decided to go Class A, loved it, then another larger one, loved it. Then came slides and we bought a new mid length with slides and all the bells and whistles. We love it. But you know the most fun were with the earlier trailers, maybe I just had more energy than I do today. All I do now is push buttons and live every bit as well as I do in my stick house while on the road. The big change is the traffic and the nutty drivers. ;)
     
  19. ddbradley952

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    I originally (b4 i bought a rv) won a used boat in a charity auto auction and in order to use it, i needed something to pull it. My car is not capable, trucks start off at $10,000, cost of insurance, etc drives the cost of boating up more than I wanted to spend just for a boat I can use about 10 times a year.
    Then budabing', a older C Class rv was an alternative. Obviously they can pull a boat, they cost very little to insure, we always grill when we go boating, beer is a consideration, if t he park doesn't allow people to sit at a table, etc, go into the camper. If you have relatives that along that just want to watch and not go in the boat, they can sit in the camper and watch tv, if somebody gets sunburned, if you want to take a fishing trip 300 miles away, the camper makes sense. now in the winter time if I want to go snowmobiling 100 miles away, I can pull them with the camper, use the furnace to keep warm, eat baked frozen entree's with palstic flatware, etc,

    That's why i bought my camper. hotel rooms are very unsanitary. Disghusting to me.
     
  20. HappiestCamper

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    QUOTE(ddbradley952 @ Dec 16 2007, 01:53 AM) [snapback]9495[/snapback]

    That's why i bought my camper. hotel rooms are very unsanitary. Disghusting to me.



    How sanitary is the hat in your avatar :D
     

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