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> No Seniors Rv Park (55 And Under Only)
bestestes
post Dec 18 2010, 12:31 AM
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We're in Mcallen, TX, one of our stops while traveling for a year in a bus with our 7 children. We do a lot of boondocking, and stay in a park about once every 7-10 days for a night or two.

In Mcallen, we made 4 calls to find a park before finding one that would 'let' us stay. Each of the 4 parks chuckled a little bit when I answered 'seven' to their questions of how many children? ... right before they said 'No'.

It hasn't hit us as hard as in this community, where there are apparently loads of 55+ RVers... It is weird to be classed out of a business, that if it was the other way around, would probably make the news:

"Local RV Park discriminates against kind senior couple".



I understand wanting to create an atmosphere of quiet restful etc- but ??
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Texasrvers
post Dec 18 2010, 11:40 PM
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Sorry you had trouble locating a park that accepts children. However, you will find that there are certain areas in the country that cater quite a bit to retirees and snowbirds. Mostly these are in warm, sunny areas such as southern California, Arizona, Florida, and the Texas Valley, as you discovered in McAllen. When you are in one of these areas you may need to do a little more looking and pre-planning than you normally would, but if you do, I'm sure you will be able to find parks that welcome children. If you do not want the hassle of a little extra looking and being turned away from some places, you may need to revise your travel plans not to include these areas. There are many other choices out there that are kid friendly.
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RFCN2
post Dec 18 2010, 11:51 PM
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You make a very good point. In the past it seemed like public RV parks tended to have lots of kids. Seems like if you looked at County, COE, State, and National Parks that you would find few issues.

I understand the problem from your side, but also it is the numbers that is the issue. Travelers with seven pets might have problems finding a park to take them, but those with one pet rarely do. Same with children. Although there are likely way more 55+ RV parks than those that do not accept pets.


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kcmoedoe
post Dec 19 2010, 10:29 PM
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I agree, it is simply a numbers issue. I own a lot in a resort and paid a handsome penny for it. It is deeded etc, but I still cannot have over 4 people stay on it at any time. HOA rules and they are vigorously enforced. It was put into place to prevent the facilities from being overwhelmed by a few large groups. Can you imagine the chaos if every site in the park had nine people on it.
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FosterImposters
post Dec 20 2010, 04:28 PM
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Welcome to the forum Bestestes! cool.gif

We met and got to know a large extended family a couple years ago, (were you all ever in the southern California area?) that were also exploring the US. They reported similiar challenges in parts of the country. Their well behaved kids were seldom all outside the rig at once, so no one really noticed.

A tip they used (when asked how many in their group) involved sometimes catigorizing their very young teens and preteens of their gang...as adults.

Somehow it was more acceptable at some parks (?) for their group to be 5 adults and 5 kids. blink.gif

The good news was they only had one dog. laugh.gif
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John Blue
post Dec 20 2010, 08:24 PM
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We only saw this one time in a State Park north of New Orleans, LA. A large 5th wheel pulled into a site in front of our motorhome with a very large van. Out rolled 12 kids, 2 dogs, man and his wife, 12 bikes come out of the back end of 5th wheel with BBQ equipment, toys, and other stuff. We were thinking his will be a fun place to be soon. The family was from TX and I wish all kids could be this nice to be around. We did not know they they were around. In a couple days they left and park was the same with and with out the kids, very little sounds.

In Rusk, TX we had 150 Boy Scouts from Dallas set up tents at the rear of out motorhome and spent the night. We were told that we may wish to move to a new site but we do wish to do so. The kids were great to be around as well, a large number ask to see inside the MH so we were running tours. We eat dinner with the kids that night and had a great time. Very nice group of kids.

Most kids are OK in RV parks.


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joez
post Dec 20 2010, 09:19 PM
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I grew up in a large family (8 children) and some of the difficulties you speak of remind me of when I was a child. I admire your ability to travel as a family. Our family rarely went anywhere as a group - simply finding a vehicle large enough to travel in comfortably was a big issue. Finding campgrounds was always an issue - in most cases my father would rent two adjacent sites - we were tents and popups, and choices were definitely state parks and COE mostly. I am sure cost was abig part of that decision, as well as, the size of the group. Many restaurants conveniently could not find seating for this large a party, even though we were extremely well behaved.

I have had mixed experience with "large family group" camground neighbors. Some have been pleasant to be near, a few have been like having a group of Tasmanian Devils in the neighborhood. If I were you, I would not worry about bucking the system - just work through the difficulties and enjoy your travels. Best of luck to you.
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Florida Native
post Dec 21 2010, 08:59 PM
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Over 55 is a legally protected class like race, sexual orientation, religion, and many other categories. It is legal for companies to do this and perfectly appropriate in many instances. We frequently stay at over 55 parks. Here in Florida, we are loaded with them. It isnít legal for companies to exclude any protected class. It would be the legal equivalent of saying no blacks allowed to say nobody over 55 allowed. We have like most frequent campers had some really bad experience with unchecked childrenís behavior. Usually the parents fault, but after hours and hours, it really doesnít matter. We usually try to find the over 55 parks. We love kids and even have one ourselves, but sometimes do not wish to enjoy others children. Looks like you have fallen victim to otherís rowdy children.


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dbnck
post Dec 22 2010, 01:07 PM
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I disagree that it's a numbers issue. Over-55 parks don't want children there at all, whether one or seven.

I recently stayed in an over-55 park in the McAllen area. When I called and asked if I could stay there if I'm 53, the woman said it was no problem as long as I didn't bring any children. This isn't the first over-55 park I've stayed at, and at all of them, I've felt pretty obvious. My boyfriend is 10 years younger than I am, and he really sticks out.

The "55" line seems to work out to an average of well over 70. While I'm a big fan of inclusion, there's something to be said for water finding its own level. An over-55 park is kind of like a fancy restaurant--a well-behaved child now and then wouldn't necessarily ruin it, but it's unlikely that either the child or the other patrons would find it the highlight of their lives, and it's definitely not something the owners of the restaurant would welcome gaining a foothold.

On edit: I ran across the OP's review of the place they stayed in the McAllen area, and went to the park's website, where it says in all caps: NO CHILDREN NO PETS

I'm glad the OP was able to find a place to stay, but if I were paying to make my home in a place that prohibited children or pets, I'd be chagrined to wake up next door to an RV with either seven children or seven dogs. I'd be particularly annoyed if my pool time had to be shared with seven children because face it, kids and adults behave differently in pools, period.

I doubt senior citizens go to Chuck E. Cheese for dinner and tell the kids to hold it down, and they don't even have any rules against them being there in the first place. That's because it's a kids place and everybody knows it. Evidently it's not the same for RV parks.







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MCRANE
post May 24 2011, 12:40 PM
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My family and I locked up our house two years ago and made a choice to not wait until we were to old to enjoy full time rving. Before doing this we spent most weekends enjoying our RV. My wife and I have four kids from 5 to 9. We have both lived in Florida most of our lives and I have always enjoyed seniors until we decided to full time. Don't get me wrong not all seniors are rude. The majority are very friendly and say that the kids remind them of thier grandkids that they miss. But the few who aren't friendly can make life horrible for a family. We have been treated like we were probly homeless even though my RV is newer than thiers. We were parked next to a lady that called the manager and said she didn't have kids for a reason, she didn't like to see, hear are know kids were anywhere around her. My kids are very respectful to others in the pool and I don't take them in the morning when the seniors are out but, if you are that afaid to have a kid splash you than you should stay out of the water. As far as seniors going to Chucky Cheese, I have seen many of grand parents there and have never seen a parent or a kid tell them they should leave because they are really unwelcome. I believe it is up to the owner if they want any group in thier park. But I also have no use for any anti kid park owner or RVer. I have work camped and can say first hand that drunk seniors can mess up a bathroom worse than a kid. I can also say first hand that families spend more money in campgrounds than seniors. More families are deciding to full time than ever before.
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Florida Native
post May 24 2011, 01:13 PM
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There are all kinds of people in the world. Businesses have to chose their markets. If they chose wrong, it hurts their bottom line and if they chose right, it helps. Business people have to deal with the world as it is, not how they or you wish it to be. If it makes since for them to be an over 55 park, then they are smart to do it and to enforce it. If people choose to break the rules they should not be allowed to do so. If a senior (like me) chooses to go to a regular park, then they shouldn't get upset when children do what they do unless it is breaking the normal park rules. We can not force our values on everybody else. Camping is supposed to be fun and we are not supposed to trample on others rights. It is just good common sense. You would be wise not to attempt to stay at any over 55 park and to make sure your kids, dog or for that matter yourself don't bother anybody else. We all pretty much do this and violations of common sense are magnified by the close quarters of a campground.


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MCRANE
post May 24 2011, 02:57 PM
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QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ May 24 2011, 03:13 PM) *

There are all kinds of people in the world. Businesses have to chose their markets. If they chose wrong, it hurts their bottom line and if they chose right, it helps. Business people have to deal with the world as it is, not how they or you wish it to be. If it makes since for them to be an over 55 park, then they are smart to do it and to enforce it. If people choose to break the rules they should not be allowed to do so. If a senior (like me) chooses to go to a regular park, then they shouldn't get upset when children do what they do unless it is breaking the normal park rules. We can not force our values on everybody else. Camping is supposed to be fun and we are not supposed to trample on others rights. It is just good common sense. You would be wise not to attempt to stay at any over 55 park and to make sure your kids, dog or for that matter yourself don't bother anybody else. We all pretty much do this and violations of common sense are magnified by the close quarters of a campground.

I have no problem with respecting others rights to have a 55 and older park. Although I do have a problem with people who act like a campground is a 55 and older park when they are not. The place I am now is that way. Even though the owners have stated several times that the park is family friendly a group of seniors who stay here refuse to believe it. Those who have an attitude that families are not as good as they are, I have problems with. Before I goto any campground I ask if they are family friendly. If they hesitate at all in their response I will not go there. From a customere stand that is all I can do. As far as feeling sorry for someone because once a kid was a doing something that upset them, I have put up with a lot of adults who were not respectful. That is just part of being around different people.
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Denali
post May 25 2011, 09:51 PM
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QUOTE(MCRANE @ May 24 2011, 01:57 PM) *

I have no problem with respecting others rights to have a 55 and older park. Although I do have a problem with people who act like a campground is a 55 and older park when they are not. The place I am now is that way. Even though the owners have stated several times that the park is family friendly a group of seniors who stay here refuse to believe it. Those who have an attitude that families are not as good as they are, I have problems with. Before I goto any campground I ask if they are family friendly. If they hesitate at all in their response I will not go there. From a customere stand that is all I can do...
We are geezers, but we often encounter other old folks who are just an embarrassment to our cohort. We never had kids, by choice, but we appreciate the folks who have been willing to keep the human race going!

As people get older they become less tolerant, more fearful of their surroundings (that's why so many old folks have firearms in their RVs), and more sure that the world is going to hell in a hand basket. I'm sorry that your family has had to be the butt of these old croaks.

Your kids are very lucky to have this experience on the road. Don't let us old farts get you down!



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Florida Native
post May 25 2011, 10:00 PM
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We live in Florida and a goodly percentage of the parks are over 55. We are now traveling thru SD on our way to Yellowstone and have not had a single problem with any other camper (Yet). When we have had problems with loud or unruly kids, it has almost always been teenager. I blame their parents. When My daughter was young, we used to tent camp a lot and she understood the rights of others.


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katsuey
post Jun 1 2011, 08:58 PM
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We stopped at a couple of campgrounds on our May 28 day trip. Most allowed children and not once did we see a child behaving inappropriate.

The KOA RV campground in Sioux City had a group of about 5 adults with 8 children. The youngest was still in diapers, the oldest was probably 12. They all seemed to have a great overnight, sat at the picnic table for breakfast then rode bikes. I enjoyed watching them - though glad I didn't have to feed to clean them.
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