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> Is It Ok To Charge For Wifi, Should Campgrounds charge for Internet access?
Should Campgrounds Charge for WiFi?
Campground WiFi should:
be Free to entice more campers to the c/g [ 317 ] ** [78.27%]
be Free in the more "deluxe" sites [ 23 ] ** [5.68%]
be charged for on a per usage basis (recieve an access code at check in if paid for) [ 44 ] ** [10.86%]
be Charged for by an outside agency when loggin on [ 9 ] ** [2.22%]
not be a part of the camping experience (leave your technology at home) [ 12 ] ** [2.96%]
Total Votes: 405
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Lee and Fran
post Jul 23 2008, 08:51 PM
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Heck all a park has to do is raise it rates a dollar or two per day and that should more than cover their cost for the service they are providing. No other costs should be added.


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Lee and Fran
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While travelin down lifes paths
stop to smell the flowers
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kcmoedoe
post Jul 27 2008, 10:20 AM
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QUOTE(Lee and Fran @ Jul 23 2008, 08:51 PM) *

Heck all a park has to do is raise it rates a dollar or two per day and that should more than cover their cost for the service they are providing. No other costs should be added.

A dollar or two here and a dollar or two there and pretty soon we are talking about significant added fees. Two dollars a day times the 180 or so days we spend in the RV is $360.00 for a service we might not use. Unfortunately That will only get me a half a tank of diesel.
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BJMA
post Jul 30 2008, 11:03 PM
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to provide WiFi access is dirt cheap and has a high return for the investment.

I will pick a free WiFi park over a pay to use over a no WiFi. I will pick a park with fewer "stars/diamonds/numbers" if they offer free WiFi.

I cannot leave my technology at home, I AM TECHNOLOGY, I need access to monitor my web store, manage my yahoo groups, and online classes.

If I were a full timer, I would have satellite access and park supplied WiFi will not matter.


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Just NOT SILENT anymore!
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Lindsay Richards
post Jul 31 2008, 02:26 PM
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The buzzword I keep seeing is “WiFi available” means, we have it, but we charge extra for it. When we see this phrase, this place goes to the bottom of the list. I have noticed that more an more of campgrounds who might have this in a campground books, now have free WiFi. This is telling me that more and more campgrounds are switching from paid to free WiFi. Investing in a good WiFi antenna is really a necessity if you do a lot of boondocking.


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hypogi
post Aug 2 2008, 04:05 PM
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As a former park owner I can tell you one thing for sure. There is no such thing as free wifi. As soon as a park offers it the overnight price goes up a buck or two. If it doesnt that means you will be paying for it when you log in.

We struggled at our park to get a consistent wifi signal. Our place was so hilly and had so many trees that hanging a 50$ router out the window never would have worked for us. So we are sympathetic when we arrive at a park and the wifi isnt as strong as we would like it to be. Try as you might things just dont always work they way you want them too.
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Lindsay Richards
post Aug 3 2008, 09:04 AM
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Getting a good WiFi antenna is a must.


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pianotuna
post Aug 3 2008, 09:39 AM
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Hi Lindsay,

Any results with range testing on your wifi outfit?


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Don
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Lindsay Richards
post Aug 4 2008, 11:55 AM
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QUOTE
Any results with range testing on your wifi outfit?


I have not tested it in campgounds yet, but have taken it out in my truck using my portable inverter testing it around the area and it appears to triple the length of ability to receive WiFi. I have set up a Rube Golberg type system with a paint roller extention pole that I can velcro to my awning stantion and put the antenna up above the level of the roof with a 360 degree view. I also bought a 10 foot extention to the antenna cable so I can run it through the window into the coach. We are leaving Thursday for a 4 or 5 day mini camping trip and I will be giving it a better test. I will post the results.


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pianotuna
post Aug 9 2008, 08:50 AM
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Hi,

I just found another site that maps wifi either around a point--or has an alternate site that will show wifi along a trip path.

http://hotspots.wirelesstrips.com/?m=R

Enjoy!


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Don
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BigDadDogg
post Aug 14 2008, 12:57 PM
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I can't leave the technology at home....my whole life is online!! laugh.gif

Seriously though, since I've retired I usually do two 3-4 month trips around the country...one in summer to get away from the Georgia heat and one in the winter to get away from the cold. The question then becomes "How do I stay in touch with everyone, pay my bills, and do the part time consulting work (helps pay for fuel...LOL) in Georgia while I'm away?" Going paperless was the first step...I get all my bills by e-mail and pay them online through my bank. Most of the bigger commercial banks will provide online banking at no charge if you have an account with them. My bank will even mail a check to those businesses that don't have any way to get an Electronic Funds Transfer..the lead time for those is just a little longer.

Obviously, internet connectivity is a must for me. I traveled for a year or so doing the WiFi thing, so staying at a campground with WiFi was the deciding factor when it came time to stay someplace. On the road, I used the Flying J monthly WiFi access (I think it was about $24/per month), but that was only good at a Flying J. I've been to CG's that provided both free and paid WiFi access and, while it really burned me to have to pay for it, I found that the paid ones were usually better connections (especially when you scream and yell for a refund when they didn't work... biggrin.gif )

My solution? I went with Verizon Broadband Wireless. When I added it to my two existing Verizon cell phone accounts, the cost for unlimited service wasn't too bad. I use it both when I'm on the road and at home. The network is great....you know, that goofy looking guy with all his friends following you around. In the two years I've been using it, I've never been without internet connectivity. If you're within 15 miles or so of an Interstate (depending on the terrain) you're just about guaranteed to have a broadband signal (speed is comparable to DSL.) Near big cities is no problem either. If you get off the beaten path though, you can usually get what Verizon calls "National Access", basically cellular phone service....even most small towns have this. Speed is faster than dial-up, but not nearly as fast as DSL or cable.

The end result is that I can stay at some of the less expensive CG's that don't have WiFi, and even most State and National Parks and still be connected. When you factor in the "hidden" costs for "free" WiFi, it turns out to be about a wash at the end of the year.

Now if I can just figure out a way to get around the cost of diesel fuel...... laugh.gif
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Kirk
post Aug 16 2008, 04:41 PM
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The fact is that not all customers of the RV park have any use for the "free" service. It may well be true that if every visitor pays the cost would only be $2/day or so, but why should we who have our own satellite dish, or those who own a cellular service air card, or the ones who do not travel with any kind of computer, have to pay for your internet access?

In a survey that I recently read in one of the RV magazines it states that the average cost per night of RV parks with "free" internet access is nearly $5 more than for those that either charge extra for it or who do not have it. There are rapidly getting to be as many internet users who have either a dish or an air card and who don't want to pay for you to have access. We do not stay in parks that combine the cost of amenities that we have no use for, into the price for a night's stay.


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Good travelin !..............Kirk
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URL: www.adventure.1tree.net
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pianotuna
post Aug 17 2008, 01:05 AM
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Hi Kirk,

So are you suggesting that toilets have a coin activated lock on the doors? Fees for walking dogs? And about that pool I rarely (if ever) use? Metered electricity and a charge for the number of hours the TV is watched? Oh yeah--the fire ring--the picnic table. I would far rather the campgrounds included all these with a flat rate fee.

Wifi is among the cheapest "upgrades" a campground can offer. I checked recently and in British Columbia more than 50% of the campground offer it.

QUOTE(Kirk @ Aug 16 2008, 04:41 PM) *

The fact is that not all customers of the RV park have any use for the "free" service. It may well be true that if every visitor pays the cost would only be $2/day or so, but why should we who have our own satellite dish, or those who own a cellular service air card, or the ones who do not travel with any kind of computer, have to pay for your internet access?

In a survey that I recently read in one of the RV magazines it states that the average cost per night of RV parks with "free" internet access is nearly $5 more than for those that either charge extra for it or who do not have it. There are rapidly getting to be as many internet users who have either a dish or an air card and who don't want to pay for you to have access. We do not stay in parks that combine the cost of amenities that we have no use for, into the price for a night's stay.



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Don
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Texasrvers
post Aug 17 2008, 12:05 PM
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I really can see both sides of this issue, and I doubt it will ever be settled. On one hand there is the group that wants a flat rate for a spot which includes all the amenities. This means some of us (me included) constantly pay for services we do not use. This group also tends to feel that charging separately for every little thing is nickel and diming you. Then there is the other group. They want a lower rate for a basic spot and then they will pay for the amenities they actually use. While pianotuna took it to the extreme, he makes a good point. Where do you draw the line for what is included as basic, and what should be add on. And if a campground does offer an a la carte menu of amenities, how can that ever be enforced? A while ago another poster jokingly (I think) mentioned colored bracelets for the pool, the restrooms/showers, the laundry, etc.

Well as I said there are two sides to this. We could go on and on, but I don't think they will ever come together.
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Kirk
post Aug 17 2008, 03:42 PM
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QUOTE(pianotuna @ Aug 17 2008, 02:05 AM) *

Hi Kirk,

So are you suggesting that toilets have a coin activated lock on the doors? Fees for walking dogs? And about that pool I rarely (if ever) use? Metered electricity and a charge for the number of hours the TV is watched? Oh yeah--the fire ring--the picnic table. I would far rather the campgrounds included all these with a flat rate fee..
I am suggesting that such issues are a business decision, just as the choice of a pool or not is one. Fire rings are getting to be very rare in commercial RV parks in the US and there are many reasons, the cost of maintaining them being a major one. There are also RV parks which state "self-contained RVs only" and that usually means that they do not have a public restroom and clearly no showers. It just depends upon what amenities that an owner wishes to supply and who he is seeking for customers.

Travel a bit and you will discover that there are many parks in the deep south which cater to snowbirds and fulltimers that state 55+ only, or no children. Then there is the Jelleystone Park group where you are a bit of a misfit if you have no children. We vote with our money and I will choose to stay in the parks which offer a combination of the amenities that I want with a price that I am willing to pay. If more customers visit the park with fewer amenities, it will prosper. If more visit the one who charges what he must and supplies everything, that park will prosper. In areas of high RV use, there is a market for both lines of thought.

At the top of the amenity list are parks that offer things like maid service, room service, and other very special services. Perhaps you feel that too should be included? There are parks which have that and they only cost in the $80 - $100 per night range. For some reason there are not a lot of them, but the handful that I know of are all doing very well. Of course, they mostly have RVs that carry a name like Marathon or Newell, but they too have their market and will survive or not depending upon market share.

You are free to choose whatever type of RV park you prefer, but please forgive me if I happen to choose a different one with different prices and amenities.


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Good travelin !..............Kirk
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URL: www.adventure.1tree.net
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pianotuna
post Aug 17 2008, 07:28 PM
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Hi Kirk,

I have traveled a bit as you may see from my "map". I find both your posts a bit aggressive and tried to lighten the tone with an exaggeration. I'm sorry you didn't get the joke.

I am a Canadian and broad band via internet is very difficult to arrange at anything like a reasonable price in USA for me (try on $10.00 per megabyte for size!). That is why I much prefer wifi (which is a minimal cost compared to most amenities) to be included.

By all means stay where you will. (My first choice is boondocking at COE and similar facilities with low fees and few neighbors).

QUOTE(Kirk @ Aug 17 2008, 03:42 PM) *

I am suggesting that such issues are a business decision, just as the choice of a pool or not is one. Fire rings are getting to be very rare in commercial RV parks in the US and there are many reasons, the cost of maintaining them being a major one. There are also RV parks which state "self-contained RVs only" and that usually means that they do not have a public restroom and clearly no showers. It just depends upon what amenities that an owner wishes to supply and who he is seeking for customers.

Travel a bit and you will discover that there are many parks in the deep south which cater to snowbirds and fulltimers that state 55+ only, or no children. Then there is the Jelleystone Park group where you are a bit of a misfit if you have no children. We vote with our money and I will choose to stay in the parks which offer a combination of the amenities that I want with a price that I am willing to pay. If more customers visit the park with fewer amenities, it will prosper. If more visit the one who charges what he must and supplies everything, that park will prosper. In areas of high RV use, there is a market for both lines of thought.

At the top of the amenity list are parks that offer things like maid service, room service, and other very special services. Perhaps you feel that too should be included? There are parks which have that and they only cost in the $80 - $100 per night range. For some reason there are not a lot of them, but the handful that I know of are all doing very well. Of course, they mostly have RVs that carry a name like Marathon or Newell, but they too have their market and will survive or not depending upon market share.

You are free to choose whatever type of RV park you prefer, but please forgive me if I happen to choose a different one with different prices and amenities.



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Don
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