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> Kwh Rates For Season Campers, Florida camp KWH rates
long haul
post Apr 26 2012, 05:26 PM
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Lately I have noticed many RV parks in Florida charging monthly campers a rate for electric KWH use that is higher then the local power providers. This is not really legal in Florida from my limited knowledge or research. A Google scan led me only to find this about the Florida rules - Florida Administrative Code Rule 25-6.049(6)(b). I do not know legal matters at all but was happy to find there is at least some info about protecting Florida RV monthly campers. Trouble is many RV camps I have called regarding their electric rates do charge more then the local utility and most managersí say they donít know who establishes their camps KWH rate. One camp manager said that the KWH charge is also water and sewer bill that the park divides by the number of monthly campers and that bill is what is then given as their Electric KWH rate bill. One Florida RV camp charged 16 cent per KWH rate to the RV camper but the local utility told me that the camp was charged a business rate including fuel surcharge etc never more then 13 cents KWH. My guess is a typical RV in a hot Spring/Sumer in Florida can expect a usage of about 850Kwh per month with one AC unit and no washer dryer use. Nice business model for hidden profits. Why donít these camps just raise the camp site rate so we all know what we are getting for our money in place of an unknown questionable electric bill at the end of a monthly stay?

What have other long term/full time Rvers seen across our great nation i.e. is this the new norm to nickel and dime RVers with KWH charges?
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weighit
post Apr 27 2012, 09:32 PM
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Normally the seasonal electric rates are posted and if that is above the cost to the campground they get to make some profit. We all have the same option, stay and pay the rate, or turn the key and drive to another place. I personally like a business that makes profit, it has a much better chance of being there next year as opposed to being another closed and shuttered operation. Business owners understand that profit is good. I also don't like surprise charges and if the rates were not posted or expressed in some way before I signed up to stay so I knew going in, that would make me upset.
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joez
post Apr 28 2012, 07:16 AM
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If you feel that a campground is charging an electric rate higher than allowed, call the state utility commission and report it. I am not certain that is illegal in FL but may be. FL is pretty much a nanny state with lots of bureaucrats that love to investigate these kinds of complaints. Send proof, you will get results.
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dalsgal
post Apr 28 2012, 10:31 AM
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We are in Texas and, from what we were told, it is a federal law that any CG can legally add administrative costs to the electric rates that they charge RV'ers. We were given this information directly from the electric company CEO. If this information is accurate then any FL law would be over-ruled by a federal law.
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JBH
post Apr 28 2012, 10:50 PM
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QUOTE(dalsgal @ Apr 28 2012, 11:31 AM) *

We are in Texas and, from what we were told, it is a federal law that any CG can legally add administrative costs to the electric rates that they charge RV'ers. We were given this information directly from the electric company CEO. If this information is accurate then any FL law would be over-ruled by a federal law.

Call me crazy, but this just sounds like another example of the US Government over extending their "assumptions" about the legality of the constitution (my understanding is the federal govt is NOT supposed to usurp the laws of each state)...Like I said, call me crazy...LOL!
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Florida Native
post Apr 29 2012, 10:11 AM
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Florida is in the process of building or has already built large and very expensive solar plants. These high costs are being paid by the taxpayers and ratepayers (I am both), so there is quite a bit of variation between different power companies. Many cities also own the power distribution systems, but no power generation plants. They by the power from the big guy and add on a large surcharge. I used to pay a very large (35%) surcharge in Mount Dora. I am now in an area serviced by a COOP and pay less than if I was with one of the big guys.


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RanMan
post Apr 30 2012, 03:10 PM
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At my campground, I only charge extra for electricity if they go over 1000 Kwh in a given month. Even then, I only charge what the utility company is charging me, which is around 11 cents per Kwh including fuel surcharges and taxes. However, some campgrounds are also paying more for electricity based on a "Demand" charge each month. (Thankfully I do not have Demand Metering at my park) With Demand Metering, they pay a separate amount that is based on the amount of electricity used during a "Peak" period of maybe 15 min. Once the peak demand is established, it can be months before this charge changes. A friend of mine operates a horse camp which closes for the winter. Even though his Kwh usage is zero for the winter months, he still may have an electric bill of $800 or more because of the demand that was set back in the summer. If you call the utility to ask about rates, they usually give the Kwh rate, but don't mention the Demand Charge, which can be quite high.
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