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> Special License For Rv Drivers
roygbell
post Jun 20 2013, 01:11 PM
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QUOTE(fpullanosr @ May 5 2013, 07:42 AM) *

How do you feel about RV drivers being required to be tested and or schooled and issued a special license? Why do you feel that way?


You can't regulate common sense and the lack of common sense is the biggest issue I have with some of my fellow RVers. I am a 72 year old farm/ranch boy. I grew up driving trucks, pulling trailers and maintaining heavy equipment.

I never set out on the road without making sure my tire pressures are all where they need to be. I check my trailer brake system to ensure the brakes are in good order. I replace the tires and brake pads long before they need to be as riding on good tires and brakes are the biggest safety issues out there. I always gear down when driving in mountain ranges and never ride my brakes. I keep everything related to my vehicle and travel trailer in great condition.

Over the years, I have become appalled at the general lack of knowledge of such vehicle safety issues by RVers I run into in the parks etc.

There is nothing a license can do to fix the common sense issues of so many RVers who are on the road today simply lack.

The greatest safety hazards we face while traveling have to do with idiots who simply don't have a clue. We spend lots of time in places like Yellowstone NP. We just got home two days ago from 5 weeks in the park. When we entered YNP in early May, we were past the south entrance going down hill around a corner and here was a car stopped dead in the highway. I had to slam on my brakes to keep from hitting him. We were almost into Mammouth Springs, again going down hill and around a corner here was a man on a bicycle stopped with his bicycle sideways across our lane watching a buffalo on the other side of the road. Again I had to slam on the brakes and got stopped about 10 feet from him. He wouldn't move. I honked at him and he still wouldn't move and there I was parked in the highway hoping no one came up behind me and ran into my trailer. I rolled down the window and screamed at him to get out of the way as he was about to get someone killed. Finally he moved.

No license will cure that kind of stupidity.

On our last days in the park there was a man, his wife and 6 year old son in Mammouth at the visitor center. The couple took their son right up to a cow elk with a calf. The elk charged, the man and woman ran and their son got kicked by the cow elk.

My conclusion is that there is no cure for common sense. So, I would be for licensing people based on common sense, but without that then no it won't solve any problems.
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Galli
post Jun 20 2013, 02:50 PM
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QUOTE(DXSMac @ May 31 2013, 05:13 PM) *

I think it's a good idea, and there should be a differentiation between Class A and Class C or B. However, I will be upset if it actually happens and I have to go through the fol de rol.

I don't think that it should some thing very complicate or difficult rolleyes.gif , the test, in my opinion , should be on some thing on like class A, to teach you how to back track , how to park , how to evaluate the safer distance to be able to block your unit in case of an emergency and how to be at the right distance between your end versus the vehicle you just passed. ohmy.gif
I noted that most of truck drivers are very understanding persons, when passing, then put the directional light out to go back to the right lane and they will signal you with lights when it would be safer to enter wink.gif .
If you already drive an RV, you should already have this perception, the most dangerous thing, in my point of view, are new drivers (or drunk drivers) ph34r.gif that come from driving a small car and switch into an RV or MH without having an idea of the space and length of the new vehicle they are driving.
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EastPAcamper
post Jun 20 2013, 04:02 PM
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It is like anything else in this world, if you lack initial common sense, you are gonna have problems. Some people just don't think, they just do as they wish. There are a lot of automobile drivers who create the dangers for RV drivers. And some of those same drivers may have RV's or TT's. Most people are not aware that trailers that aren't really designed to be towed over 70-75 MPH. But you see it every single day, you have to factor the weight if an emergency stop is needed. Sure most 3/4 and 1 ton dualies will pull a camper well over 70, some 1/2 tons will too. But it the overall weight or combined weight that creates problems. Much like tractor trailer drivers complain about automobile drivers, they cut in front, or pull out in front of them. Stopping an 80,000 rig on a dime is impossible, unless you use walls.
I DO feel that some drivers should go through a competence course, and maybe the insurance companies could use that for discounts if you pass. They do that with motorcycles here in PA, go through a safety course get a ID card and discounted rates.
I drive all my vehicles like I am on my bike, ready for anything and everything to happen, I drive well over 40K a year for work, so I get to see more incompetent dopes than the average Joe.
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Galli
post Jun 21 2013, 08:45 AM
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QUOTE(EastPAcamper @ Jun 20 2013, 03:02 PM) *

It is like anything else in this world, if you lack initial common sense, you are gonna have problems. Some people just don't think, they just do as they wish. There are a lot of automobile drivers who create the dangers for RV drivers. And some of those same drivers may have RV's or TT's. Most people are not aware that trailers that aren't really designed to be towed over 70-75 MPH. But you see it every single day, you have to factor the weight if an emergency stop is needed. Sure most 3/4 and 1 ton dualies will pull a camper well over 70, some 1/2 tons will too. But it the overall weight or combined weight that creates problems. Much like tractor trailer drivers complain about automobile drivers, they cut in front, or pull out in front of them. Stopping an 80,000 rig on a dime is impossible, unless you use walls.
I DO feel that some drivers should go through a competence course, and maybe the insurance companies could use that for discounts if you pass. They do that with motorcycles here in PA, go through a safety course get a ID card and discounted rates.
I drive all my vehicles like I am on my bike, ready for anything and everything to happen, I drive well over 40K a year for work, so I get to see more incompetent dopes than the average Joe.

I agree 100% with your statement and the only thing that I would emphasize is a straight application to demerit point to the license, I realize that there are unreasonable people that even the driving license is not important but the majority would be concerned about it.
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spartancaver
post Jun 22 2013, 04:57 AM
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If bus drivers need their own license, I do not see why Big Rig drivers should be exempt just because they are private individuals. As has been stated before, I too have seen drivers exit their Big Rig using a walker, taking 10 minutes to walk the length of their RV.
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EastPAcamper
post Jun 22 2013, 07:34 AM
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QUOTE(spartancaver @ Jun 22 2013, 06:57 AM) *

If bus drivers need their own license, I do not see why Big Rig drivers should be exempt just because they are private individuals. As has been stated before, I too have seen drivers exit their Big Rig using a walker, taking 10 minutes to walk the length of their RV.


Sorry, but just because someone has a walker and walks slow, does not mean they cannot operate an RV in a safe manner. My Pops is 73 and can tow just about anything, not to mention could go through a coned course backing a trailer all the way through.
Remember that a bus driver is an occupation in which the operator is responsible for the passengers on the bus, therefore they need some sort of credentials to show that he/she is able to perform his/her job the safest way he/she can. IMO, it's a big difference from an big rig operator. just sayin...................
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susseandchris
post Aug 28 2013, 12:31 PM
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I am anticipating purchasing a fifth wheel and truck in the next few months. I do not have experience driving such heavy vehicles and I am very concerned about the people out there who do not possess the skills to drive these rigs safely. I very much want to find a way to train in safe big rig driving. In Ontario I would need to upgrade to an 'A restricted' licence since the vehicles I anticipate buying are well over the 23,500 pound weight which is the upper limit for using your regular licence. My question is: where does one find driver training for big rigs? You can go to tractor-trailer school here, but it costs approximately $9,000 to take the course! I would sure welcome some ideas here!
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Galli
post Aug 28 2013, 01:17 PM
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QUOTE(susseandchris @ Aug 28 2013, 11:31 AM) *

I am anticipating purchasing a fifth wheel and truck in the next few months. I do not have experience driving such heavy vehicles and I am very concerned about the people out there who do not possess the skills to drive these rigs safely. I very much want to find a way to train in safe big rig driving. In Ontario I would need to upgrade to an 'A restricted' licence since the vehicles I anticipate buying are well over the 23,500 pound weight which is the upper limit for using your regular licence. My question is: where does one find driver training for big rigs? You can go to tractor-trailer school here, but it costs approximately $9,000 to take the course! I would sure welcome some ideas here!

Good question and concern, when I bought my truck and 5th W. I contracted with the dealer that he/she should give me some practical lessons in driving with all equipment. other suggestion would be to befriend a person with a similar equipment and ask him/her to help you.
According to my own experience and if you are a reasonable person , it is not difficult, the main concern is, keep low speed until you feel familiar with the system, also remember, the truck and trailer DO NOT break at the same SPEED as a car, YOU NEED more space and when you are passing an other vehicle, keep on the left as long as you can and then keep the directional light working on the right that will show that you are planning to go back to the right side, most likely, if you pass a truck, they will flash their lights to let you know that the time for you to go back on the right.
Furthermore, remember to monitor the maximum weight that you are allow to carry versus what you put into the unit; most likely you will find the specification closed to the door of the camper/RV/M.H…etc. you will find the unit weight and the maximum wait you will be allowed to have.
I apology if you felt that I was explaining obvious things to you, it was not my intent. GOOD LUCK
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EastPAcamper
post Sep 2 2013, 08:45 AM
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QUOTE(susseandchris @ Aug 28 2013, 02:31 PM) *

I am anticipating purchasing a fifth wheel and truck in the next few months. I do not have experience driving such heavy vehicles and I am very concerned about the people out there who do not possess the skills to drive these rigs safely. I very much want to find a way to train in safe big rig driving. In Ontario I would need to upgrade to an 'A restricted' licence since the vehicles I anticipate buying are well over the 23,500 pound weight which is the upper limit for using your regular licence. My question is: where does one find driver training for big rigs? You can go to tractor-trailer school here, but it costs approximately $9,000 to take the course! I would sure welcome some ideas here!



There is some information in the form of video and text on the web, there are even some books out that give a general run down on how to operate a large travel trailer. Like the last person said, the RV dealer should offer you a quick course, and it will be quick. Large empty parking lots are a good place to practice backing up, using the stalls to back into. When I was 13, and old timer taught me this trick for backing up with a trailer. Place your hand at 6 o'clock on the steering wheel, which ever way you want the trailer to go, more your hand(and the wheel) to that direction. Eventually it becomes second nature. Again, like the other person said, keep a safe following distance, you have two to three times the weight behind you, not to mention the momentum. Paying attention to the mirrors at all times is also key, some people will be trying to weave around you on the road, always and frequently watch the outside mirrors. I drive 60-65 on the interstate with my MH, don't care if the speed limit is 75, I stay right and signal all lane changes. On long trips , I do a walk around and inspection of lights, tires, etc, usually during fuel stops sometimes a little more frequent. Most of my trips are usually less than 4 hours of driving. I do on occasion get some trips that are longer, but not near as many as I'd like.......
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Galli
post Sep 2 2013, 09:39 AM
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QUOTE(EastPAcamper @ Sep 2 2013, 07:45 AM) *

There is some information in the form of video and text on the web, there are even some books out that give a general run down on how to operate a large travel trailer. Like the last person said, the RV dealer should offer you a quick course, and it will be quick. Large empty parking lots are a good place to practice backing up, using the stalls to back into. When I was 13, and old timer taught me this trick for backing up with a trailer. Place your hand at 6 o'clock on the steering wheel, which ever way you want the trailer to go, more your hand(and the wheel) to that direction. Eventually it becomes second nature. Again, like the other person said, keep a safe following distance, you have two to three times the weight behind you, not to mention the momentum. Paying attention to the mirrors at all times is also key, some people will be trying to weave around you on the road, always and frequently watch the outside mirrors. I drive 60-65 on the interstate with my MH, don't care if the speed limit is 75, I stay right and signal all lane changes. On long trips , I do a walk around and inspection of lights, tires, etc, usually during fuel stops sometimes a little more frequent. Most of my trips are usually less than 4 hours of driving. I do on occasion get some trips that are longer, but not near as many as I'd like.......

[b]EastPAcamper', you are talking like a printed book, I could not explain the issue better. and as safety feature, every time you stop for gas, make a tour around the unit and see if anything looks awkward
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EastPAcamper
post Sep 15 2013, 10:29 AM
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QUOTE(Galli @ Sep 2 2013, 11:39 AM) *

[b]EastPAcamper', you are talking like a printed book, I could not explain the issue better. and as safety feature, every time you stop for gas, make a tour around the unit and see if anything looks awkward


Sorry if I sound like a book, a printed one at that........ laugh.gif
Just trying to help where I can, recently, I've seen two too many RV people with flipped rigs on the interstate. I can only guess it was due to negligence or operator error, since they were both single vehicle incidents.
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