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> Interesting Option For Electric Only "boondocking", Shorepower technologies
Fitzjohnfan
post Oct 10 2013, 01:31 PM
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Here is a new option for campers to be able to plug in for very reasonable rates. One person used them in Utah and the rate was $1.00/hour and $1.00 to turn on the electricity.

http://www.shorepowerconnect.com/

Imagine some of the possibilities. What if Wal-Mart installed some? What about storage facilities, you could plug your RV in and have it turn on 24 hours before you arive so your refrigerator will be cold when you arrive.

RV parks could use them to upgrade their electrical infrastructrue and then customers could pay only for the electricity they need and it would prevent those showing up late and leaving early without paying. Of corse the rate would have to be higher since the customers might use other facilities that the owner would have to maintain.

What do you think?


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NYDutch
post Oct 10 2013, 04:29 PM
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Hmmm, $1 an hour is a pretty steep price for electricity. One campground I was at last winter in Florida only charged me $12 for a week of metered power.

Walmart is not likely to ever install any RV specific amenities beyond designated parking spots. To do so would open them up to having to comply with any number of local, state, and federal health and safety requirements that a basic parking lot operator does not have to be concerned with.


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Dutch
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Fitzjohnfan
post Oct 10 2013, 10:41 PM
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QUOTE(Dutch_12078 @ Oct 10 2013, 04:29 PM) *

Hmmm, $1 an hour is a pretty steep price for electricity. One campground I was at last winter in Florida only charged me $12 for a week of metered power.


I agree, but take the situation where you just want to stop for the night, recharge your batteries, maybe pop some popcorn, and watch a movie. You could plug into one of these for 4 hours for a lot cheaper than getting an electric only site at a campground. Certanly not for everyone, but it does add an option for those looking for a quick stop, and electric plug in, especially those RV's without an onboard generator.


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NYDutch
post Oct 11 2013, 12:10 PM
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If that's all you're paying for a few hours of stopping to recharge (or pop some corn), then yes, it might be a worthwhile alternative.


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Dutch
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pianotuna
post Oct 13 2013, 10:29 PM
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Hi,

With a fast charger that would be ok.

However, it is designed for electric vehicle charging and that voltage is incompatible for most RV's


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Denali
post Oct 14 2013, 10:25 AM
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We saw their "TSE Pedestals" at a truck stop a while back. They were standard 50-amp hookups, located around the border of the parking lot.

There's a picture here: Truck Stop Hookups


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Dave Rudisill
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willranless
post Oct 16 2013, 08:36 AM
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QUOTE(pianotuna @ Oct 13 2013, 11:29 PM) *

However, it is designed for electric vehicle charging and that voltage is incompatible for most RV's

Just curious, how is the voltage incompatible with most RV's?
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GandJ
post Oct 16 2013, 07:31 PM
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Cool idea. National Grid in NY state is installing charging stations in the
Buffalo area. We saw some in the parking lot of Burchfield-Penney (art
museum), but I think they were just for cars. The theory is the people
with electric cars will use them to "top up" while they run errands or
go to museums or such things.

http://www.buffalonews.com/business/new-ef...c-cars-20130925

Having charging stations with compatible RV hookups would be awesome.


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John S.
post Dec 15 2013, 07:29 AM
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We really do not need charging stations but just electric as our batteries all have different amp hours. I do not think this is for spending the night at and during the day traveling, the alternator keeps us charged.


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docj
post Dec 15 2013, 08:29 AM
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QUOTE(RanMan @ Oct 16 2013, 10:36 AM) *

Just curious, how is the voltage incompatible with most RV's?


The pictures clearly show a trucker using a standard extension cord plugging into the side of his truck. National Electric Code would require a standard outlet be compatible with any other such outlets with respect to voltage and current.


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pianotuna
post Dec 15 2013, 02:45 PM
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Hi,

Car charges are generally "level 2" which means 30 amps @ 240 volts. An rv might not like that too much. But then--it is likely to be a different plug. Specifically a J1772.

IPB Image

It is also possible that I'm wrong and that they do have a "level 1" outlet which would be 120 volts @ 20 amps.

If it does 20 amps @ 120 volts, then with a charge of $2.00 for the first hour it competes with running a generator. After that it "wins" sorta kinda. I'd still not wish to pay $1.00 per hour for 20 amps @ 120 volts.

QUOTE(RanMan @ Oct 16 2013, 08:36 AM) *

Just curious, how is the voltage incompatible with most RV's?


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Denali
post Dec 15 2013, 07:24 PM
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QUOTE(pianotuna @ Dec 15 2013, 12:45 PM) *

Hi,

Car charges are generally "level 2" which means 30 amps @ 240 volts. An rv might not like that too much. But then--it is likely to be a different plug. Specifically a J1772.

IPB Image

It is also possible that I'm wrong and that they do have a "level 1" outlet which would be 120 volts @ 20 amps.

If it does 20 amps @ 120 volts, then with a charge of $2.00 for the first hour it competes with running a generator. After that it "wins" sorta kinda. I'd still not wish to pay $1.00 per hour for 20 amps @ 120 volts.
Again, the pedestals that I inspected at a truck stop had standard 50 amp RV outlets. I have no idea what their fee schedule looks like. I couldn't find a way to see their fees on their web site.


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pianotuna
post Dec 17 2013, 12:49 AM
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Hi Dave,

Did the ones you saw have the shorepowerconnect label on them? Or were they from someone else? I did find a page that says the company offers a level 1 charging connection on their pedestals--but it doesn't specify the plug type, other than to say it is 20 amps @ 120 volts.


Hi docj,

No, it looks more like a Marinco twist lock to me, on the truck. It does suggest a 12 gauge or larger cord. It does suggest that there is a 120 volt plug on the pedestal though. Marinco is a standard--but not that many RV's have the twist lock type connectors.

IPB Image

QUOTE(docj @ Dec 15 2013, 08:29 AM) *

The pictures clearly show a trucker using a standard extension cord plugging into the side of his truck. National Electric Code would require a standard outlet be compatible with any other such outlets with respect to voltage and current.


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NYDutch
post Dec 17 2013, 08:52 AM
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Shorepower's web site says that all that's needed to connect to their truck stop power pedestals is a heavy duty extension cord. They do offer a kit that includes a GFCI, breakers, and outlets for installation in a trucks that are not prewired, but it's not a requirement to use their system. Marinco power cord connectors are standard on many boats, TT's and 5'vers, as well as some newer shorepower equipped truck cabs/sleepers.


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docj
post Dec 17 2013, 11:39 AM
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QUOTE(Dutch_12078 @ Dec 17 2013, 10:52 AM) *

Shorepower's web site says that all that's needed to connect to their truck stop power pedestals is a heavy duty extension cord. They do offer a kit that includes a GFCI, breakers, and outlets for installation in a trucks that are not prewired, but it's not a requirement to use their system. Marinco power cord connectors are standard on many boats, TT's and 5'vers, as well as some newer shorepower equipped truck cabs/sleepers.


I appears that adapters are readily available, also. This is a 30A adapter, and I'm sure 50A ones are available also: Locking 30A adapter


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