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jmcf46
post Sep 28 2011, 11:07 AM
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I have a pistol and was wondering if it is a good idea to carry it in the rv. Vermont does not require a pistol permit just a background check but other states are much more stringent on pistols. I don't know how safe you are in an rv park. Probably a silly question and I'm leaning towards leaving it at my home in Vermont.

Jim
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B. Kidd
post Sep 28 2011, 12:39 PM
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QUOTE(jmcf46 @ Sep 28 2011, 09:07 AM) *

I have a pistol and was wondering if it is a good idea to carry it in the rv. Vermont does not require a pistol permit just a background check but other states are much more stringent on pistols. I don't know how safe you are in an rv park. Probably a silly question and I'm leaning towards leaving it at my home in Vermont.

Jim



Vermont is one of two states where firearms carry of any kind, open or concealed, is properly viewed as a right not subject to regulation. The state does not require a license to carry a firearm. As far as vehicle carry is concerned, a concealed, loaded handgun placed in a glove compartment, console box is legal along with a pistol carried on a person. Rifles and shotguns/long guns must be unloaded while being transported in a vehicle. Vermont also has a preemption law that prevents munincipalities from enacting local laws that regulate the carry, possession, and sale of firearms. The state does prohibit firearm carry in schools, courthouses, and/or any "state institution". Of course, munincipalities may still regulate the discharge/use of firearms.
Whether you choose to carry or not is a personal choice. But if you choose to carry in Vermont, you'll be okay.

I highly recommend the manual "Traveler's Guide to the Firearm Laws of the Fifty States". You can find it at www.gunlawguide.com.
Hope this helps.
Adios!
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gilda
post Sep 28 2011, 07:38 PM
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Leave it home.....

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joez
post Sep 28 2011, 09:21 PM
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QUOTE
I highly recommend the manual "Traveler's Guide to the Firearm Laws of the Fifty States". You can find it at www.gunlawguide.com.


X2
If you carry at home you may want to carry on the road. Be aware, however, that state laws range from very liberal to draconian so crossing from one state to another may change how or when you can carry a weapon and in what situation(s) it can be used. There is a lot of debate sometimes on forums like these about whether an rv is a house or a vehicle. The truth is there is probably not enough case law to tell one way or the other. The percentage of rvers with guns probably matches the population in general. Most who have weapons don't talk about them. IMO, there is no more or less danger when traveling/overnighting in an rv than when traveling by auto. Whatever is best for your peace of mind, safe travels.
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Lindsay Richards
post Sep 28 2011, 10:06 PM
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A bill recently pass the house and is in the senate that requires all states that have concealed carry permits to accept the license of that state. The rules of the state you are in apply, not the rules of your home state. I am licensed in Florida therefore legal in 31 states, but carry a pistol in my truck almost always. This is illegal, but I know many camper also do it I also carry a 12 gauge in my RV. I know several years ago, national parks allow you to do whatever the state you are located in. We boondock a lot and I feel safer doing it this way.


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chowhound
post Sep 29 2011, 02:37 PM
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If your home is Vermont, it would be difficult to get anywhere south or west with out going through two of the toughest states as to gun laws in New York and New Jersey. I would highly encourage you to read all you can about the gun laws of the states you are both traveling to and through.
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B. Kidd
post Sep 30 2011, 03:08 PM
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QUOTE(chowhound @ Sep 29 2011, 01:37 PM) *

If your home is Vermont, it would be difficult to get anywhere south or west with out going through two of the toughest states as to gun laws in New York and New Jersey. I would highly encourage you to read all you can about the gun laws of the states you are both traveling to and through.



Illinois ranks right up there too! In Chicago, handgun ownership has been banned since 1982. No preemption law as even a small town like Morton Grove has entirely banned handgun posession.
My motto: I'd rather be tried by 12, then carried by 6.
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Lindsay Richards
post Sep 30 2011, 03:47 PM
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In Chicago the US Supreme Court has taken down that law. It is legal to have it in your house, but illegal to actually take it to your house. How dumb is that. The gangs can buy a pistol in about 30 minutes.


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hoefler
post Oct 2 2011, 08:22 AM
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Your best bet, if you don't have one already, is to take the concealed carry class and get your permit. Check the states that will honor your permit, and plan your route accordingly. If you don't advertise, or be stupid, no one will or should suspect or know anything. Personally, I travel with 3 guns, one in the truck, one in the coach, and one in my pocket. Go ahead and flame away, I don't care. I have a permit and I am legal where ever I go. My point is, if you are smart about it, no one will know you are an armed citizen and prepared for what ever may come along. The reason for 3 is, when you are driving you are sitting on one and need to access one easily. It stays in the truck out of site but accessible. Don't have to worry about any one seeing it go from the ruck to the trailer. The one in the trailer can be accessed by my wife as well as my self. I am not paranoid, I am prepared.
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Lindsay Richards
post Oct 2 2011, 08:33 AM
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The only time I have ever been asked if I had a firearm was when going into Canada. We took the toad and left the Ket-Tec 380 auto in the coach. I have seen signs at state parks and national parks (now changed) about firearms and alcohol. We were in violation on both, but did not flaunt either. If we are taking a trip we do not avoid a state that doesn't honor my carry permit. We as always just keep a low profile. I rarely actually carry my weapon on myself unless we go somewhere I feel uncomfortable, We always try to avoid. You example, I remember was downtown Brownville, TX


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RLM
post Oct 2 2011, 09:20 AM
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I think those that have a CCL would agree that it was worthwhile to get it. The specific law and safety issues relating to gun ownership that are taught in these courses certainly make that true. As mentioned, there are different statutes for different states, but having a CCL provides some safeguard on the compliance issues when you travel. Having a firearm used to target practice is a gun. A firearm used for protection is a weapon as would be a knife, ball bat, pepper sprays, etc. If the latter is at least one reason for having it, then Iíd suggest that the CCL is a necessary tool for some legal protection.

There may be a technical issue here with respect to the CCL. Since you stated that Vermont didnít require a CCL then getting one in another state presents some legal issues. Many of the reciprocal agreements among states are based on one being a resident of a particular state where they obtained the license. In other words, residing in Vermont and getting a CCL in another state makes the license at least partially invalid as you travel.

As for leaving it at home, thatís a personal preference. Your RV is a moving home so I am wondering if the logic for even having a firearm would be the same.
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KentuckyCampin
post Oct 14 2011, 04:45 PM
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I have a carry conceal in the state of KY and it is reciprocal in many states. Before I go camping out of state, I do a little research on the gun laws so I am legal. However, in KY you are not allowed to bring a gun into any KY state park. One law I wish KY would change!


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Lindsay Richards
post Oct 14 2011, 04:58 PM
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I have carried my Mossburg 500 shotgun and my pistol into a KY state park and I'll bet I wasn't the only one. I had them secured in my coach and didn't flash them around. I have never heard of anybody ever getting into trouble for doing this type of thing, but I certainly do realize it is wrong. If we are going to be gone for 3 months, we can't do it any other way because we go into and out of the 17 states where my permit doesn't count. The House has passed a bill to make every state recognize all other states permits with the rule of the occupied state prevailing. Probably won't pass the Senate until after the next election.


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RLM
post Oct 14 2011, 06:19 PM
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As I mentioned in my previous post there are different statutes for different states, but taking a CCL course provides beneficial education in knowing the specific laws for the state in which you reside and on how to research the applicable laws for other states that you travel in.

I did a quick search of the KY laws and did not find that a state park could prohibit you from having a handgun if you have a CCL. Just because an establishment says you canít, or posts a sign to that effect, does not mean it is the law.

I whole hardly believe in the second Amendment. But if Iím on the jury that decides whether or not you broke the law with respect to use, training, and not being licensed then I will respectfully tell you that I would be inclined to let you fry for that.

Please do a favor for those of us who have a CCL. Get the license and training so that you can join us in educating misguided anti-gun groups who think weíre all crazy cowboys.

It's a hundred bucks, one day out of your schedule, and a chance to put some rounds down range. How simple is that?
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joez
post Oct 14 2011, 06:44 PM
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QUOTE(KentuckyCampin @ Oct 14 2011, 04:45 PM) *

I have a carry conceal in the state of KY and it is reciprocal in many states. Before I go camping out of state, I do a little research on the gun laws so I am legal. However, in KY you are not allowed to bring a gun into any KY state park. One law I wish KY would change!


A lesson to all of us that if we choose to own/carry weapons it is our responsibility to research the laws for each state (and sometimes locality) where we will be. One of my favorite resources is Travelr's Guide to the Firearms Laws of the Fifty States by Scott Kappas, Esq.

Following is from Ky State Police web site - no restriction on state parks.
A concealed firearm or other deadly weapon SHALL NOT be carried in the following places:

Police station or sheriff's office.
Detention facility, prison or jail.
Courthouse (Court of Justice, courtroom or court proceeding).
County, municipal, or special district governing body meetings.
Meeting of governing body of a county, municipality, or special district.
General Assembly session, including committee meetings.
Any portion of an establishment licensed to dispense beer or alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to that purpose.
Elementary or secondary school facilities (without the consent of school authorities).
Child-caring facilities, day care centers, or any certified family child care home.
Areas within an airport where restricted access is controlled by the inspection of persons or property.
Any place where federal law prohibits the carrying of a firearm.
In addition to the above restrictions, units of state and local governments and postsecondary education facilities (colleges, universities, technical schools and community colleges) have the authority to limit the carrying of concealed weapons on property owned or controlled by them (KRS 237.115). You should check with units of state and local government as well as postsecondary education facilities prior to carrying a concealed weapon on their property.

Also, KRS 527.070 prohibits unlawful possession (whether carried openly or concealed) of a weapon on school property, except for certain specified exceptions. KRS 244.125 prohibits loaded firearms (concealed or otherwise) in places where alcohol is sold by the drink, except for certain specified exceptions.

In addition, Kentucky law does not prohibit the owners of private premises from excluding persons carrying firearms. Failure to vacate private premises when asked to do so could result in a criminal trespass charge.
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