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Bud in Florida
We are considering getting a small car to tow behind our motorhome. Would love to hear pros and cons and suggested vehicles. Also, anyone tow with just a plain tow bar attached to the dingy bumper? Thanks
Big Ben
We flat tow a 4X4 GMC 1500.. To answer your question about attaching a tow bar to a bumper, I would not recommend it, unless it's like a jeep with the steel bumpers. The make brackets that bolt to to frame. Don't know what kind of MH you have. All the gas jobs are pretty much limited to 5000#. Tow bar assemble will run $500 or more. Most manual transmissions can be towed with out changes.
Some like to trailer a car. To me that becomes a problem at many parks on putting the trailer some where.
RLM
Bud> Go to the FMCA website and check out their tow guide http://fmca.com/fmcmag/towing/

Most manual transmission vehicle can be towed four wheels down.

I've towed several cars, but currently tow a Ford Ranger w/manual 5 sp transmission. About 3100 lbs. it's on the edge of where supplemental braking equipment is recommended. It is real simple to prepare for tow. Turn the ignition switch to accessory and put the transmission in neutral.

I like the utility of a small truck in that I can throw things in the bed without worrying about whether they are clean or dirty. Especially, nice to toss things in the bed after one nighters instead of packing them away in the coach. When not on the road, it comes in handy for general purpose hauling.

Trucks seem to be made better than cars. Over the years, I've owned half dozen and never once had to get anything repaired. The downside of my Ranger is that it only seats two people.

Agree that it is not a good idea to attach tow bar to bumper even if you can find a vehicle with a real metal bumper anymore. Good ones are designed to be bolted and tack welded to the frame.

Expect to shell out a grand or so for the tow assembly, tow bar, and labor to put it on. Depending on how high the coach's receiver hitch is off the ground, you also may need a step down receiver to make the tow bar horizontal with the ground when attached to the toad.

Choices are many. Good luck.

Rick
rontrem
Gee, you have to join to access the tow guide.


QUOTE(RLM @ Apr 28 2007, 11:53 AM) *

Bud> Go to the FMCA website and check out their tow guide http://fmca.com/fmcmag/towing/

Most manual transmission vehicle can be towed four wheels down.

I've towed several cars, but currently tow a Ford Ranger w/manual 5 sp transmission. About 3100 lbs. it's on the edge of where supplemental braking equipment is recommended. It is real simple to prepare for tow. Turn the ignition switch to accessory and put the transmission in neutral.

I like the utility of a small truck in that I can throw things in the bed without worrying about whether they are clean or dirty. Especially, nice to toss things in the bed after one nighters instead of packing them away in the coach. When not on the road, it comes in handy for general purpose hauling.

Trucks seem to be made better than cars. Over the years, I've owned half dozen and never once had to get anything repaired. The downside of my Ranger is that it only seats two people.

Agree that it is not a good idea to attach tow bar to bumper even if you can find a vehicle with a real metal bumper anymore. Good ones are designed to be bolted and tack welded to the frame.

Expect to shell out a grand or so for the tow assembly, tow bar, and labor to put it on. Depending on how high the coach's receiver hitch is off the ground, you also may need a step down receiver to make the tow bar horizontal with the ground when attached to the toad.

Choices are many. Good luck.

Rick
Big Ben
Thats to bad it did not use to be like that.
RLM
mad.gif I wasn't aware that they had changed that.

Since I am a member of FMCA, they are going to get a nasty-gram about it.

Rick
Browzin
Go to Motor Home mag. http://www.motorhomemagazine.com/
and scroll down to the bottom & click on Dinghy towing guide.
You do not have to join anything. It is open to the public.
dog bone
if you tow a 4x4 with an automatic, put the transfer in neutral. that way you won't be ruining the trans.
Big Ben
if you tow a 4x4 with an automatic, put the transfer in neutral. that way you won't be ruining the trans.

That is not true with all manufactures. Toyota dosn't recommend towing most of their models.
Marcus
Hi,

I have towed a Honda CRV all over the US (including to Alaska) and Canada. Like others, I do not think you should even consider towing on the bumper. A good tow setup will attach to the frame of your toad (common reference to a towed vehicle). I think that towing with all four wheels on the ground is the best arrangement although others may believe differently. Towing 4 down lets you hookup and unhook easily (can be done with most setups in less than a minute), the toad following around corners better (does not cut an inside track as much as a trailer or tow dolly), and does not result in a storage problem at a campgound (the dolly or trailer takes up room). Expect to spend $500 - $1,000 to get a good setup. It is worth it. I am a strong believer in having a braking system on the toad that is active when towing. I use a proportional braking system made by M&G engineering (Google to find them). M&G is not a well known company but I believe they have the best system available and they stand behind their product for a lifetime. I recently had the proportioning valve go bad after 9 years and a simple call brought a free replacement in the mail within a week. I put a bracket on the front of my CRV (part of license plate bracket) and have quick connects for both air (braking system) and power (lights) to simplify hooking up. Before you ask, I tow with a gas powered MH with air supplied by an onboard compressor furnished as part of the M&G sytstem. The braking system will cost you another $1,000 give or take (less if you do the install labor yourself which is relatively simple). Finally, although I have always had a "towable" vehicle (one that can be towed without adds ons or modifications...check Motorhome's guide to towable vehicles for a list), virtually any vehicle can be towed with all four wheels on the ground. For example, my brother tows a Buick Lesabre and I know one fellow that tows an older Rolls Royce. It's a matter of proper equipment. My brother uses a Remco transmission pump on his Buick. My father towed automatic conventional autos for over 20 years (all Buicks) using a similar setup without problem. The major thing is to avoid a vehicle that excees the tow limit of your motorhome or the GCVW (gross combination vehicle weght) of your rig (when you are loaded with full fuel, water, etc.) and to obtain and use the proper equipment.

good luck.
Bud in Florida
Thanks for all the good information. I realy appreciate it
Beastdriver
Bud: Two years ago, we were considering changing toad vehicles and braking systems. My friend, John Blue, a frequent contributor to this site, recommnended a Honda CRV with the M&G proportional braking system. Two years and 22,000 miles later, I could not be happier. Wonderful system and vehicle and well worth the money.
Wyoming07
QUOTE(Bud in Florida @ Apr 27 2007, 07:51 PM) *

We are considering getting a small car to tow behind our motorhome. Would love to hear pros and cons and suggested vehicles. Also, anyone tow with just a plain tow bar attached to the dingy bumper? Thanks

Bud; The best vehicle is the Honda crv, with a tow bar attached to HM ,and a aug brake for the towed vehicle, Insurance co's are real funny when it comes to tow brakes, any questions e-mail me and I will answer, Senior citizen, Wyoming 07 : :
Texasrvers
I'll put in a good word for the 4X4 Jeep Grand Cherokee as a tow car. We have been towing ours for almost 6 years and have had no problems. All we have to do is set the automatic transmission according to manufacturer's directions and it is ready to go. We also have the M&G braking system and it has worked great. One thing to consider about a tow bar that I don't think has been mentioned is if you want the kind that stays on the motor home or on the car. We purposely chose one that stays on the motor home. Only a few parts remain on the car which we also remove when we are not traveling. Before getting the Jeep we towed a car on a tow dolly. That lasted only about 8 months. The tow bar is much easier!
John Blue
Bud,

We run a 1999 Honda CRV wheels down with the M&G air braking system. We have run our motorhome and tow all over the USA now. At 98,000 miles I replaced the tires on Honda due some small cupping, tires looked like new. We have never had one problem yet with tow bar or Honda and other post said couple mins to hook or unhook tow. We love the fast stopping time with M&G system. Best part is you have no box in floor on Honda or need to do anything to it. We plan to run the wheels off this unit in our years to come. What a nice way to travel! tongue.gif
gwbischoff
Does anyone have any experience with the Roadmaster Even Brake sysytem?

First time with a toad and it looked like a good system.
bigredoes
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Jun 28 2007, 02:02 PM) *

Does anyone have any experience with the Roadmaster Even Brake sysytem?

First time with a toad and it looked like a good system.



We use an Even Brake from Roadmaster and so far (only using a couple months now) so good. Only concern is the signal between the toad and the 'box' in the RV is sometimes challenging. Also the box in the RV does have some problem with the connection to the 12 v - which I guess means I should call them and see what is going on.....thanks for the reminder lol.
gwbischoff
QUOTE(bigredoes @ Jun 29 2007, 11:09 AM) *

QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Jun 28 2007, 02:02 PM) *

Does anyone have any experience with the Roadmaster Even Brake sysytem?

First time with a toad and it looked like a good system.



We use an Even Brake from Roadmaster and so far (only using a couple months now) so good. Only concern is the signal between the toad and the 'box' in the RV is sometimes challenging. Also the box in the RV does have some problem with the connection to the 12 v - which I guess means I should call them and see what is going on.....thanks for the reminder lol.


I'm not quite sure I know what you mean by the signal "is challenging"?

I bought a Falcon towbar and the skirt to keep stones off of the toad all from Roadmaster.

All seemed like decent products for the price.
bigredoes
I guess what I mean is...and remember I AM TECHNOLOGICALLY IMPAIRED....while driving down the road the receiver located in the coach that 'tells me' what is going on with the Even Brake system will beep when going over bumps in the road ( a short in the cord??? I don't know). Also when I have to hit the brakes harder than normal sometimes the red light that indicates the toad brake is being depressed does not return to green right away. If it stays on too long I pull over to make sure that the toad brake is not engaged and both times it was not however the red light on the coach receiver indicates red until I reset the entire system. I hope this does not happen often as it really slows one down when you have to pull over and check the brake system on the toad.

So I reckon that is what I meant when I said the signal to the receiver was "challenged" - I reckon I need to contact Even Brake to see if they can educate me....
Texasrvers
gwbischoff,

I know you specifically asked about the Even Brake, but if you haven't yet bought a system I think you should consider the M&G system. Read farther back in this thread to see what others have said about it. We have had ours for 6 years. We even moved it from one coach to another with no problems. Just something to think about.
gwbischoff
In researching a new vehicle, I checked the aforementioned 2007 Dinghy Towing Guide and it mentioned the Toyota Camry as towable with 4 down.

Yet before buying one, I checked the Owners Manual and it states specifically that you should not tow one with all four down.

Anyone know what is the scoop?
TexasRee
I agree that the M&G is the best brake system. Works very well and so easy to connect. It is hard to believe that some people tow without a braking system.

Jurhee

QUOTE(Marcus @ May 7 2007, 11:34 AM) *

Hi,

I have towed a Honda CRV all over the US (including to Alaska) and Canada. Like others, I do not think you should even consider towing on the bumper. A good tow setup will attach to the frame of your toad (common reference to a towed vehicle). I think that towing with all four wheels on the ground is the best arrangement although others may believe differently. Towing 4 down lets you hookup and unhook easily (can be done with most setups in less than a minute), the toad following around corners better (does not cut an inside track as much as a
gwbischoff
I know it's up to the individual states, but where is it legal to drive without a braking system?

Mostly so I can avoid those states.

Holy cow...
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