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Lindsay Richards
I hate to admit this, but we frequently ask for a lower rate (my wife of course) and frequently get it. This happens when the park is nowhere near full. She will say, if we don't stay tonight, that spot will probalby remain empty and you will get nothing at all for it. We used to be inthelodging business and I know that this used to work on us. I feel pretty bad doing it, but I like the discounts. Our style is to not make reservations until the afternoon as we don't know where we will be for the night. If it is going to be a busy weekend, we don't follow this tactic. We recently did a Maine to Florida 3 month round trip and I we rarely ever stayed in a full campground. We are usually very low impact campers anyway.
riggarob
OK. Is this before, or after you ask about military, AAA, AARP, discounts, etc? dry.gif













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RLM
So your wife is the one who wears the pants in the family?? biggrin.gif
Beastdriver
I don't mean to be insulting, but I think your actions are niggardly and cheap. Every merchant in the world has set a price based on what he or thinks is a reasonable profit, and people like you are very frustrating. I would tell you to get packing if you didn't want to pay the rate, and quit wasting my time.
Big Ben
I don't guess that it is so much different than trying to get a 25% discount on a new MH. What was it Old Ben had to say about a penny saved?
Texasrvers
This really doesn't sound much different than going into a large retail store or a car dealership or even an RV dealer and asking if this is their best price or if they will match the price of the same item in the store down the street. Many retailers will discount items in order to get your business (this is sometimes called a"sale"), but I am equally sure they do not go below an amount that would not give them some profit or they wouldn't still be in business. Besides when you mention your Good Sam membership aren't you asking for a cheaper price?

I also think whether this is proper or not depends a lot on how you approach the campground owner. If you are polite and simply inquire if there might be a better rate or a discount then the owner can decide if he wants to lower his rate. On the other hand if you go in with the attitude that the prices are way out of line and demand a lower price then the owner probably should kick you out.
Lindsay Richards
When we were in business before retiring, we routinely had people asking for a discount. Sometimes we did and sometimes we didn’t depending on the situation. In a campground, a site is a perishable product. If you don’t sell it today, it is lost money. Not like a pair of shoes that you can sell the next day if you don’t sell it today. I believe that their expenses are fixed like mortgage, insurance, upkeep, labor, ETC and variable like, water, electricity, ETC. If they have a lot of sites open and you both know they won’t be full that night, getting 2/3’s or so of the normal rate is much better than getting nothing. You will be defraying the fixed expenses and not really adding too much to the variable. We of course don’t run around the campground saying, “I got them down to only $15 Yippee.” I think the campground owners generally realize this and they will usually take less. For the first 6 months of our marriage, I tried to wear the pants, but it didn’t work out.
Gracie & Chloe
Sorry, but I am with Beastdriver on this issue. An RV park is a service industry, not a retail outlet, such as a car dealership. Definitely apples and oranges. I am sure you don't go into a restaurant and try to negotiate a lower price on the daily special with the thought in mind that they may have to throw away some food at the end of the day.

Lindsey, you had a B&B with 4 rooms for rent at a rate of between $140 and $190 per night per room, according to the website. You also lived in the house, so your expenses other than food were barely impacted by having the rooms rented or not rented. An RV park would have to rent 25 sites per day to make what you could make in a day, and I'll bet your expenses were minimal compared to an RV park.

If I were an RV park offering the normal discounts, I am afraid that if you asked for more, the next move your vehicle made would be entering the highway at the end of my drive.

I have full-timed for 4 years and never once asked for an undisclosed discount.
BBear
I've never asked for a discount that wasn't offered. But, if I were to stay at a campground that I thought was really over priced, I probably would ask for one now after reading this topic.

I know there is one campground the Jellystone Park in Williamsport, MD where I definitely would ask for a cheaper rate if I would ever decide to go there...they charge you a base rate for your campsite and then charge you 7 dollars per night per person for the first three days to cover costs for their new waterpark, of which I wouldn't use and it also covers the mini golf and go-carts neither of which I'd use...I think that charge is ridiculous...give the people wrist bands who want to use that stuff and charge them for it and they shouldn't shove it down the throats of people who don't want it.
pianotuna
Hi,

I don't have much jam when it comes to asking for a reduced rated.

What do you do? Ask the price and then say "is that the best rate you can offer me?"
RLM
How many people who belong to organizations like Good Sams, Passport, FMCA, or the like would not ask for the discount even tho the campground may not publically advertise it? The same goes for a senior discount at any type business. How is that different from Lindsay’s issue? The campground is still taking less for the site. If you live in the preverbal glass house, don’t throw rocks.

Has anyone noticed lately that a lot of campgrounds require a two-day stay over a weekend? That would be the reverse of a discount.

If you don’t ask the discount question, the answer is automatically no. Either way, it’s a personal choice and the final answer rests with the merchant. Getting the most for the least is called free enterprise. It’s worked in this country for a very long time.
Texasrvers
True. RV parks aren't quite the same as retail stores and that may be comparing apples and oranges. So how about hotels? Are they more like RV parks? At either place you are paying for overnight accommodations. And I think that there are many times when people make a hotel room reservation that they say "Is that your best rate?" or something similar like "Is there a weekly rate or a package deal?" If you ever listen to the Today Show (or any of the other morning programs) their travel and financial advisors are always telling you to ask about better rates when booking hotels, flights, tours, cruises, etc. They say these rates are out there, but you have to ask about them in order to get them. I still do not think there is anything wrong with asking if there is a better rate. The owner can always say no.

All that said I do not make a habit of asking RV parks for a lower rate. I almost always pay the stated price without word one. If I do ask if there is a lower rate I never try to argue them down by telling them that their rates are ridiculous or too high for what you get, etc. If they say "No," then I say, "Thank you, thought I'd ask just in case." So I emphasize again that the attitude with which this is done makes a huge difference.
Lindsay Richards
Gracie I wish those prices you quoted were correct. Actual was much lower than that and average was about $115. About 75% of B and B’s don’t even break even. We did a little better, but it was surely not the money maker most people think. The free living was mainly what it provided. If we had openings, we almost always accepted a lower offer. I too have questions about asking for a better rate and that’s why I started this thread. I have discussed this with many campground owners and they pretty much accept or offer a lower rate if the circumstances suggested it. Campgrounds have a much lower per site variable rate than a B&B and fixed cost are the big thing there. (according to the ones I have talked to). They give discounts for Good Sam, Passport America, ETC to get in additional business and most of that additional business goes straight to the bottom line once the mortgage, taxes, ETC have been paid. Electric in a hot state like Florida is about $3.00 per day and frequently we don’t even hook up water and sewage. That was the way I would look at it is do take the ˝ price, with about all of it going to the bottom line or take nothing. I would also pay cash which all small business’s like. Arguing down a price certainly isn’t acceptable in my opinion. I have been on the wrong side of that too many times. We just ask and then stay or leave. From their side, depends on how much they need the revenue, if they think they can fill it without us for that night, and other factors. For us it depends on how long we have been dry camping, levels of my tanks, how tired we are, and the main deciding factor is what the Boss wants to do.
dmsscs
I have never asked for a discount mainly because i know how these things can grow. If I get this discount and the guy behind me then says, hey what about me and goes out and tells his brother in his RV that he got the discount, and next week he reserves for his site and six of his best friends now expecting the discount that he got last week and so on. I was in the store of one park during a busy check-in and there was a woman arguing that the site wasn't was she expected, she needed two boards to level the trailer, it wasn't wooded enough and it was too close to her neighbors. When the park offered to move her to another site, she said no, she's keep the one she was on but wanted some money off. To me, that just opens the door for everybody that camps to find a problem to reduce their price, however, she admitted all was well because she was willing to stay put for money off. Some people will try anything to save a buck. Once there was a woman that wanted a 30 amp site, the park didn't have one available, so ofcourse she wanted money off the 20 amp site because it wasn't what she really wanted. The park called a neighboring park to find her a 30 amp site, the woman didn't want it she stayed in the park later we sat with her at a campfire, I asked her why she didn't take up the offer of the other park she told us she didn't really need the 30 cause she had a pop-up, only wanted to pay less for her site. She said the other park didn't have as much to do as this one did and she really enjoyed camping there. Nice way to thank the park for their efforts! She wanted to pay less for more.......
riggarob
QUOTE(dmsscs @ Aug 20 2007, 01:22 AM) *

I have never asked for a discount mainly because i know how these things can grow. If I get this discount and the guy behind me then says, hey what about me and goes out and tells his brother in his RV that he got the discount, and next week he reserves for his site and six of his best friends now expecting the discount that he got last week and so on. I was in the store of one park during a busy check-in and there was a woman arguing that the site wasn't was she expected, she needed two boards to level the trailer, it wasn't wooded enough and it was too close to her neighbors. When the park offered to move her to another site, she said no, she's keep the one she was on but wanted some money off. To me, that just opens the door for everybody that camps to find a problem to reduce their price, however, she admitted all was well because she was willing to stay put for money off. Some people will try anything to save a buck. Once there was a woman that wanted a 30 amp site, the park didn't have one available, so ofcourse she wanted money off the 20 amp site because it wasn't what she really wanted. The park called a neighboring park to find her a 30 amp site, the woman didn't want it she stayed in the park later we sat with her at a campfire, I asked her why she didn't take up the offer of the other park she told us she didn't really need the 30 cause she had a pop-up, only wanted to pay less for her site. She said the other park didn't have as much to do as this one did and she really enjoyed camping there. Nice way to thank the park for their efforts! She wanted to pay less for more.......


Didn't happen to catch what state she was from, did ya?
gilda
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dmsscs
no riggarob, why do you think you might know her???
i think we` all know someone like that.
BBear
QUOTE(gilda @ Aug 20 2007, 05:07 PM) *

I just have to put my 2c worth in here. I have managed parks in the past. I would find it extremely arrogant if someone asked for a better price. Would you go into a restaurant and ask to pay less on a sandwich ? Do you ask at Walmart if they can do better on their price ?

If I was asked this at an rv park, I would probably search for an extra charge that I could impose. Actually, someone did ask once. I laughed and said...You're kidding, right ?


Would you also think people are arrogant if they ask if any specials or discounts are available?

After all, isn't that the same as asking for a better price?
gilda
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BBear
QUOTE(gilda @ Aug 21 2007, 11:34 AM) *

Of course not. We don't wait for someone to ask what discounts we accept. We ask at check in or over the phone if they belong to ......Good Sam, AAA, Passport America, etc.....

There is a big difference, and I'm certain that you must know that.


Sorry, I don't see any difference...both requests want to lower the price they want to pay.

I've been to tons of campgrounds who offer specials that I did not know about until I checked in.

Hotels essentially work the same way...they have standard and off the rack rates and then they have specials and such.
Lindsay Richards
I think managers and owners tend to look at this differently. As a former lodging owner, I tending to look at how things affected the bottom line when a manager tends to look at the additional work needed to be done. Having 2/3 revenue instead of nothing always appealed to me if the nothing was a sure thing and the discount was a one time thing. We would never discount if there was still a good chance of getting full price. We noted that our competition who used a manager would not do this even though instructed so by the owner. They even turned people away when they had space available. I would be interested in hearing how often people asked for a lower rate. In our business it happened about 20% of the time and I have had campground managers tell me it was about the same. They even had guidelines set up for the phone people as to what they should do. If the campground is 1/3 full at 5 PM during the week off season, they will be thrilled to get the business.
gilda
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jeanette b
QUOTE(Beastdriver @ Aug 16 2007, 08:12 PM) *

I don't mean to be insulting, but I think your actions are niggardly and cheap. Every merchant in the world has set a price based on what he or thinks is a reasonable profit, and people like you are very frustrating. I would tell you to get packing if you didn't want to pay the rate, and quit wasting my time.



I don't think you meant to be insulting to the guy asking for a discount but you sure picked an insulting way to phrase your opinion. Can't believe this sight let you use the "phrasing" you used. So they probably won't edit me calling you ignorant. biggrin.gif
Big Ben
Some time you have to consider the source. He seems to be a well educated guy. If you look at his back posts you will see it is the nature of the beast. I do agree with you.
Beastdriver
And I think, Big Ben, if people will review your previous posts they will find that you are an acerbic, acromonious, bitter old guy who can curd milk with anyone who disagrees with your position which is often ridiculous. I guess this is why many of my friends on this site with whom I correspond privately often refer to you as Pig Pen instead of Big Ben.
riggarob
Hey you guys, as a former combat MARINE, and a member of Iron Workers local 745 for 30 years, you ought to be able to gode each other better that that !! I've heard worse from my 12 year old son. Git it on !!! tongue.gif
gwbischoff
Ok, I don't want to cast stones but I felt the need to add a few things.

One problem in general that I've noticed with a lot of fellow RV'ers.

I know we all come from different backgrounds, different socio-economic backgrounds, etc. But I believe that there are a certain group of people (not sayin' you, Lindsay) who do this for sport.

I've stood behind people in line to register at a $25/night campground who took 20 minutes arguing about a 10% discount. I think we can all do the math on this one. It only heightens the experience when you see the rig that these people drive up in.

You have every right to ask for a discount, but they have every right to tell you "Sorry".

And when you arrive in a 1/4 million dollar rig, don't act like a bum-on-a-bologna-sandwich over $2.50.


Oh, and one other thing I think needs mentioning.

While "niggardly" may sound offensive, I think you need to look it up. It means "cheap" or "stingy" and has nothing whatsoever to do with the "other N-word". I might have danced around it a little differently, but don't get all bunged up over it.
jwillie44
Asking for a discounted rate is an excellent idea. Thanks for it. Certainly the RV Park owner will decide whatever is in his best interest, so it is win-win for all concerned.

And by the way, there are many, many RV Parks that are not hesitant to raise their prices if special events are going on in their town and they know RV spots will be in high demand.

And while I'm on the subject, I have been full-timing long enough to be able to tell which RV Park owners have been in the business too long and view RVers as pests. I NEVER stay at those places, you shouldn't either.
gilda
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wprigge
[quote name='gilda' date='Sep 12 2007, 01:10 PM' post='8315']
"And by the way, there are many, many RV Parks that are not hesitant to raise their prices if special events are going on in their town and they know RV spots will be in high demand."[quote]


Its called running a business !!
[/quote]

And asking for a reduction is called being a wise consumer.
riggarob
How about "gouging the consumer", instead of "running a business" ? I like the 2nd one though. cool.gif


Its called running a business !!


And asking for a reduction is called being a wise consumer.
Lindsay Richards
When we ran our lodging business, we realized that a room night has a different value on different days depending on demand. It is normal for owners to realize this and adjust their prices to reflect this. The law of supply and demand works and to not recognize this hurts the owner and the customer. IF a campground owner’s average rate is say $30 and the big Magnolia Festival is on this weekend, he might raise his rate to $50 and still turn away 50 campers. The following Monday night, might dead and he might be happy to rent the same site with the same services for $20. In both instances the customer was happy as one got to be right near the action for the big Magnolia Festival and the Monday night guy got a nice place at a reduced rate. Giving away a site at way less than value would be dumb of the owner and turning away the $20 people and getting nothing would also be stupid. This is just smart business on both ends of the price spectrum. I have been on the receiving of the long haggling and won’t do it myself. We (my wife) asks once and we make our decision. When things are slow, the owner gets a thrill when the phone rings and they want to get something rather than nothing. If they don’t want the lower amount all they have to do is say no.
Sunflyer
Interesting discussion. I think that how the question is asked has everything to do with a lot of the contention here.

Were I to be at the point of paying and then ask "Can you lower that price anymore?" or "Can you knock another 10% off that price?" etc., that would be at odds with my concept of this type of interaction. If I was on the clerk side of the desk I'd tend to think a bit less of the person and probably refuse.

Were I to approach the desk to discuss a site/price and then ask "Do you have any additional or special discounts other than the advertised ones at this time?" That would seem a perfectly reasonable question that would put the ball back in the court of the employee or manager who could decide if they wanted to offer anything lower.
gilda
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campergal
We own a campground and one night we had one 30-amp full service site left. A gentlemen came in with a large motorhome and asked for unserviced as he was completely self-sufficient. I explained all I had was one 30-amp full service site, he said he would take it but only wanted to pay the unserviced rate, a difference of $11. I politely declined his offer, he left - I know if he stopped at the next campground down the road he would pay pretty much the same amount so he probably continued on his way and parked overnight somewhere. Turns out I rented that spot to a tenter who was more then happy to pay full price for that spot.

I have a number of people ask me for senior rates, off season rates etc. We don't over charge for our sites ($24, $29, $35) so I don't discount. I am a Good Sam Park so if you want a discount I will sell you a Good Sam Membership - that gives you 10% off plus a free night's camping - you make money on that. I have had people leave because I won't discount but I am always polite and friendly as they leave. Some get quite upset when I tell I don't discount.
HorizonQueen
Whether you are asking for a discount at a campground, a special at a restaurant or negotiating a price for a sale or service as long as you are a good sport and polite and remember your "please" and "thank you" then you have allowed the decision maker the ability to respond in kind. If you keep your emotions in check there will be no tires squealing in the parking lot, overturned dinner plates or name calling. Remember we are all out there camping to enjoy this big beautiful world provided to us FREE of CHARGE by Mother Nature herself. An excellent discount if I do say so myself. biggrin.gif
Butch
HorizonQueen,

Well said, thank you.
kenmullins
When you pull into an RV park, generally you don’t know the rates, unless you called ahead. I often find that “advertised” rates don’t include extra fees, for children, pets and once I paid an extra fee because my RV was longer than 20 feet.

I see it as a straight business transaction. “Do you have a lower rate or discount?” At that point the manager can say “yes” or “no”. Either way both parties have to arrive at what they consider a “fair” price.

I do have heart burn with the argument “You can afford it?” If you think about that for more than a minute, you have to ask yourselves, where does it stop?
johnwadams
I don't see this as being any different that the rest of the lodging industry. Most hotels and motels have a handful of rates.

I spent many nights over a long period of years in a Ramada Inn at the "IBM" rate which was 1/2 the regular rate which was 1/2 the rack rate. They had left the rate list lying around and "IBM" was one of the cheapest rates. The rack rate only applied to special ball game weekends when everyone sold out. I always avoided the sold out weekends the best I could and after several years they would still give me the "IBM" rate if I was forced to be there on one of those weekends. OH, they knew I was not with IBM but staying there to take care of my father who was in a nearby nursing home. We always had the same first floor room so our blind dog could find her way out to the grass and back if she had to during the middle of the night. When they upgraded their suites with 25" tv's they had several left over they planned to use in the bar but found they would not fit. Guess whose room got one??

These days I usually travel as part of a 2 to 4 RV caravan and by early afternoon we usually know where we will be stopping for the night. I will call ahead and if the rate is $30@, I will not hesitate to ask if they will take, say, $80 CASH for four pull through sites for one night. I think being on the phone gives you an advantage over being there. BUT, I am usually successful and several owners have asked us to stop in next time we pass by.

AND, I never discuss rates if any other customer is in the office. In October I stopped in at a place my wife and I use for an overnight stop 4 to 6 times a year. A new arrival walked in behind me. I let him check in first, pay his $26 and leave, then I paid my usual $12 cash. We carry a note book and accumulate the names of owners, wives, children and anything else about each place we stay at. I think it adds a nice touch to be able to walk in, call the owner by name and ask about Judy and little Bob and what little Bob thinks of his first year in high school. This particular owner was putting Direct TV dishes at various sites and had 2 or 3 boxes he would loan out for the night. Or, if you had your own box, you could hook up without messing with you own dish. When I see a dish somebody has put at the street, I grab it and give it to him on my next trip.
Lindsay Richards
Several nights ago while coming back in our car from a Christmas trip, I stopped at a discount hotel along the expressway. The gentleman in front of me had a reservation and I heard is rate while he was paying. After he left, I asked the clerk (the owner I think), for his best senior rate. He quote me a rate $23 than the guy with the reservation. I gave him my card. It was a Sunday night and I noted the next morning he was about 1/3 full. I think he was glad to have the revenue and help keep his employee’s working. I did not get into a long bargaining deal, just let him know I wanted his lowest rate and we both ended up happy. I would not have paid the extra $23
tallyo
I don't ask for a discount if I am staying just a short time. But if a week or more I always ask if they have a weekly / monthly rate.

My grand daddy always said..." Never mind the price, what's the discount?"
riggarob
QUOTE(tallyo @ Jan 21 2008, 06:08 PM) *

I don't ask for a discount if I am staying just a short time. But if a week or more I always ask if they have a weekly / monthly rate.

My grand daddy always said..." Never mind the price, what's the discount?"


My old man always said..."you never know until you ask"
Silvana
cool.gif Having worked at both campgrounds and lodges I would like to say they are different.
Lodges/Hotels have discounts for late arrivals staying one night only. This is very common Nothing wrong with asking for the best price.
Campgrounds thats different. it's ok to ask for a discount , but don't badger the clerk! Remember guests in campgrounds talk to each other and compare prices. That's not as likely in a hotel. I can not say how many times I heard " oh come on darling you can do better than that for me" or " I insist on a better price, I want to see the manager".
I've had some guests that I took the reservation for, where I made notes on the reservation saying customer was told about extra price for extra vehicle or person, or special holiday rate. Where I noted customer was not happy and will try to argue at check in. Guess what, I got to check them in. Yes sir, I took your reservation, I remember talking with you, I even made a note on your reservation that we discussed this. They still argue and still try for a better price! Some just want to stay for free and have us pay them for the pleasure of their company.
Yes, I do still enjoy being a workamper, these people are few compared to all the ones that are a pleasure to check in. smile.gif
johnwadams
First; I think it's great this topic has generated so much interest.
Second:
Campers talk about the rate they got?? So do people on airplanes. What about the person that pays full price at a Passport America Park and finds that their neighbor only paid 1/2 of that? The list could go on and on. People over 62 get most COE & other Federal CG's at 1/2 price. 3 weeks ago a Diesel Pusher paid $8 for the site next to my $16 site. His price was on the stub he had to put on his post. I am over 60, retired and on a fixed income with a $16,000 trailer. Is that fair?? Mississippi just changed their rate structure at some state parks where a premium site with full hookups is the same price for everyone, regardless of age. That's a proper step for the public sector.
BUT:
Many people want a fair rate at a private park when all they want to do is stop for one night to rest. I travel with a group of up to 11 other RV'ers. When I stop for the night, all I want is a site with electric. I don't use the pool, hot tub, bathhouse or anything else. I just want a place to park and sleep with electric and get up and continue on the next day. I have stayed at Wal-Mart's on occasion in the cooler months. I have run across one RV Park with a $10 for 10 hours rate. And, I see some of the nicer RV parks on Passport America only allow the 1/2 price rate for one night. If more RVPark owners would take a look at a lower rate for one night or 10 hours or similar, it could be a win-win situation for the RV'er and the park owners. Just look at the revenue lost to those that stay at Wal-Mart, truckstops and other places for free.
AND:
On the other hand, I have never asked for a discount that was not published on any park where I stayed for more than one night. Looking back we do ask for a group rate and have gotten a 20% discount or 7th night free or stay 10 nights for the price of 8. But this is only where we have a block of sites.
AND LAST:
We never argue over a rate in the park office. Any discounts are pre-arranged by phone and the owner can always just say "NO".
John
Parkview
biggrin.gif

Well, I've stayed out of this topic until now, but I just can't resist any longer, so I'm jumping in.

We offer a number of discounts for qualifying travelers:

1 - We have our regular nightly rate for which we give a 10% discount for TACO, Good Sam, FMCA, AARP, KOA or any other camper club card that you can pull out your wallet.

2 - We also have weekly rates, monthly rates, and seasonal rates which are all less than the daily discount rate. The monthly and seasonal rates are not available during our busy Summer Season.

3 - We have a non-summer on-site storage rate for those who want to leave their rig parked on the site and visit on weekends or less frequently without having to pay for camping when they are not there .

4 - We offer 25% off to Escapees members.

5 - We offer 50% off to Passport America and Happy Camper members. There is no limit as to number of nights on the 50% off, but we do not honor it during our Summer season when we typically turn away 2,000 or more people desiring to pay full rate. We sell Passport America memberships here, and if you decide you want that rate, we will gladly qualify you the moment you purchase the membership. We will even honor it retroactively if you decide to purchase a membership at any time during your stay with us.

We will not give any of these discounts to anyone who cannot show a card showing proof of membership. To do so would devalue the memberships.

So, I'm on the side of "It doesn't hurt to ask" , but don't get angry at us if you have not bothered to join any of these programs.

Everyone have great time camping wherever you go. biggrin.gif

Doug
FosterImposters
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So, I'm on the side of "It doesn't hurt to ask" , but don't get angry at us if you have not bothered to join any of these programs. Everyone have great time camping wherever you go. biggrin.gif Doug
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Parkview...you are a breath of fresh air. wink.gif
Sure can tell you've been on the other side of the RV windshield. Thank you.
march2397
QUOTE(gilda @ Sep 15 2007, 06:16 AM) *

You are absolutely right. However, That is NOT the way that it is asked. If one asked in that pleasant manner, they may have a chance of getting a deal. But, unfortunately it is asked in a presumptuous manner and tone, something like "Oh come on, you can do better than that" or in a lot of cases, because of the type of person asking, it is many times "c'mon honey, or sweetheart". In my case it is ALWAYS the man asking and asked in a very arogant manner.

In hotel/motel situation, you have an entirely different situation. (Similar to airlines , car rental, etc). These people are strangers and in most cases remain strangers, therefore not discusing what they paid for their service. However, in the RV park industry, the guests are outdoors and DO talk of what they paid, and believe me THEY DO TALK. And, come to the office demanding a deal that his neighbor got. It is NOT worth the hastle.



Thanks for sharing. Seems to me that your policy is very reasonable.

Interesting topic. Obviously opinions vary.
RLM
Parkview> I concur with FosterImposters. But, you shouldn't have waited four pages to speak a little common sense.
Parkview
biggrin.gif

Thanks RLM,

I waited so long to enter this topic is to avoid the appearance that the only reason I participate in this forum is to promote my own park. I enjoy RVing and running an RV park, but I try not to treat this site as an advertising page. I try to add informed commentary to topics that I think I may know something about or have an opinion about.

Doug
grim509
Hi all, I know it's an old topic, but I'm new today here, and felt like commenting lol

I only ask for standard discounts, AAA and the like. (I'm military, so I ask EVERYWHERE not just CG's) I have noticed many places are willing to accomodate discounts if given a good reason. I was at one CG a few years ago, asked if they had military discount, gal at the counter told me "no, sorry" then the owner popped his head around the corner and said "sure, why not?" So it can't hurt to ask. Just be polite about it and not pushy or cheap.

Just by being polite, the CG that gave me the military discount also gave me much more than I reserved, because of it. They upgraded me from a basic tent site, to a full site, even against my objections, because we only had a tent lol. They told me they were empty, so why not use it? I laughed and accepted.

Again, give a reason for them to give you a discount. They're letting you use their property, they don't owe you anything other than what you pay for.
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