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gwbischoff
Ok, common sense and most people (myself included) say not to run down the road with your propane on.

Others are from the camp of "Awww shoot. You ain't gonna' hurt nuthin'".

I always err on the side of caution, but it'd be nice to run the fridge during an 8 hour drive across the desert.

So which is it?
rodman
I don't know what the rule is but I have always run the tank on so the fridge stays cold. Esp like you said on a longer trip.

As always just my opinion,
pianotuna
Hi,

How about running an inverter and powering the fridge from that?

QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Aug 22 2007, 07:00 PM) *

Ok, common sense and most people (myself included) say not to run down the road with your propane on.

Others are from the camp of "Awww shoot. You ain't gonna' hurt nuthin'".

I always err on the side of caution, but it'd be nice to run the fridge during an 8 hour drive across the desert.

So which is it?
Texasrvers
We used to keep the propane on while we were going down the road in order to keep the fridge cold. But then we kept hearing horror stories which convinced us this was not the best thing to do. So now we do some other things to keep the food cold. Actually many times if it is not very hot and if we are not traveling very far we don't do anything. Items have stayed cold and/or frozen for 3-4 hours this way. If we have room we sometimes use the ice packs used in ice chests. We freeze them overnight and then put them in the fridge area right up against items that should remain cold (like mayo, milk, etc.) These have never fully thawed out even on long travel days. If you don't want to buy these ice packs you can freeze water in small plastic bottles and they work just as well. If it is really hot we run the generator which in turn runs the fridge. If it's this hot we usually run the the roof air also. Basically we just decided to play it on the safe side. Besides we never could remember to turn off the propane and fridge when we filled up with gas, and you are definitely supposed to do that. So now we don't have to worry about that either. Sorry pianotuna, I can't answer your question about using the inverter.
Butch
We have also heard the horror stories that relate to operating a refrigerator on propane. With our first rv, we did not even consider the possible dangers of running the refrigerator on propane while going down the road. After many conversations with others on the subject, i.e, various dealership personnel, rv'ers, and service/customer service personnel with the manufacturer's of both the refrigerator and the Rv, the majority stated," that the refrigerator was designed to be operated on propane while in transit". We have known of some, who operate their furnace while in transit. I draw the line on this one. We presently do use our refrigerator on propane while in motion, but one must make that decision in which they are most comfortable with.
John Blue
In all our years of travel the only time propane is off is at "re-fill time". This happens about every two years or so, 47 gal. tank. Never had a problem, never talked to anyone who had one, and never found anyone who had a fire due to propane. Bad wiring in RV units will burn down more equipment than propane. In our bay the MH has vents system to let in air and vent gas out. Also has all copper pipes to each piece of equipment with cast iron manifold at tank. If system is build right you will never have a problem.
Butch
John Blue,

Have to agree with you, but we were talking to a couple from New Jersey, who related this information to us. They were in their motorhome on an expressway, heading north from Florida, and was about to pass a 5th wheeler. For some unknown reason they delayed the passing, and BOOM ! The refrigerator exploded, blew the side of the rv out, and the contents of the refrigerator followed all over the highway. This is of course all hearsay, second hand info, but definitely makes one think as to what could happen.
rodman
This is all new to me. I have never heard any stories. Are you guy's talking about motorhomes or trailers. I have been pulling a TT for a little over 10 years and never heard anything.

Thanks for the information
sparky
well I have had 2 campers and now I am on my 4th motorhome logging almost 200,ooo miles and "always" leave the propane on---except when fueling and I have "never" had a problem
sparky in Virginia
smile.gif smile.gif
Texasrvers
I can't say if the stories we heard were about motor homes (which we have) or travel trailers, or if they were even true for that matter. They were just some of those stories that float around like urban legends. If I recall, though, at least one had to do with the propane lines that jarred loose from road vibration and then a spark somehow ignited the propane and boom. Another involved not turning off the propane at a gas station (which we were bad about) and again a spark somehow ignited the propane or the gasoline or both and boom again. I was very glad to hear from Butch that the refrigerator and RV manufacturers say they are designed to be run on propane while in transit so that if we ever have to use it while we're traveling it will probably be safe. However, we have gotten so used to not using the propane when moving we probably won't start now.
Big Ben
Twelve years of full timing we have never had a problem running the propane on the road. I would think if there were a real problem , there would be laws against doing it or at least recommendations from the manufacture not to do it.
mastercraft
I run with mine on, I just turn it off when refuelling. A friend of mine did experience a problem with the propane on, but the propane was not the problem. He got into an accident where a large bus passed him at a high rate of speed. He ended up flipping the travel trailer and vehicle. The interstate was closed for 4-5 hours while Haz Mat turned the propane off. This is the only case I personally know of that having the propane on turned into a dangerous situation. With as many members that this site has, you would think that if running with the propane on is dangerous, someone would have a personal experience.
RLM
I've never turned off the propane on my 04 motorhome when moving. Neither the water heater or stove have pilot flames and the propone won't ignite until the electric starters are engaged.

I even wonder if a flame is needed to make a fridge cold when operating on propane. I cannot hear the sound of propane igniting as it does when the water heater is on.

So, if there is no flame from the heater or fridge then it would not seem a hazard issue when refueling. Propane fumes by themselves can't ignite fuel fumes inherent at a gas station.

This is a good safety topic that needs a definative answer. Perhaps from the manufacturer or a certified RV technician.
mastercraft
RLM,
On my 5th wheel and both travel trailers I owned the propane did ignite from the outside. There is not a pilot light, but that ignition could ignite gasoline fumes or so they say. If the ignitor ignites the propane close enough to gas fumes, then I suppose a disaster could occur.
dmsscs
We always travel with the gas on the fridge, we were told that as long as the fridge was level for 24 hours before we turned it on, we could travel with the gas on, no problem. We have been doing it in our last two motor homes. I haven't heard any horror stories, yet. We sit around a lot of campfires, I'd think some one would have mentioned it by now!
John Blue
One more update, we do shut down refrigerator if we are in RV side of fuel pits (Flying-J) due to gas vapors around pumps. This only happens one or two times a year. We always use the truck diesel pumps and drop off tow to fill it up with gas if we can. You have a very small fire in ref. burner (if it is cooling) and that could start a fire at gas pumps.

Disaster telling will be around forever, like RV person making coffee on the I-5 in LA.
Glenn Norton
I shut the propane off when travelling due to concerns about what if my motorhome does get in an accident or what if I forget to turn it off when refueling. My better half feels safer in any event. We use freezer packs which usually keep the fridge cold enough as long as no one keeps opening up the fridge. Even if it does get too hot, then I use the 12 volt selection in the fridge and shut if off immediately when the motorhome is shut down. Believe me that does not happen too happen up here! rolleyes.gif
iam_cathy
We purchased our first camper (a 38' 5th wheel) last August, the dealer told us that the fridge was meant to run on propane while in transit. We usually don't if we are going on short trips, but our trip from Wisconsin to South Dakota we did. Although I did freeze food to use as "ice blocks" with some food that we did put in a cooler. It was nice to be able to have an ice cold beverage once we were done driving and set up everything up.

I have never heard of blow-ups during travel. It might be an urban legend. I guess if its going to blow up, it will blow up no matter where you are (in transit, or parked)l.
riggarob
Hi all. The only time I turn mine off, is when we go thru the Cheasapeak(sp) bay/bridge tunnel , when crossing the Cheasapeak bay. Called them before we headed that way, and it was the only thing that they told us we had to do before crossing. Other than that, as you all well know, the fridge automatically swiches to what ever power source you are on. smile.gif






















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John Blue
I found this data in FMCA dated June 2007 on RV fires.

Roughly 70% of motorhome fires are in engine compartment due to coolant and fuel leaks. Another 20% can be attributed to tires and service brake (over heat) problems. So only about 10% of coach fires can be caused by other means. Less that 1% are due to propane problems.

So the bottom line is to keep your coolant and fuel hoses in good shape, and yes coolant will burn, water will dry out in a second and (ethylene glycol) will burn. Also keep a check on air pressure in tires (over heat). All this information is good for towing trucks as well as motorhomes. tongue.gif
Kevin
I always travel with the "gas" on for the fridge. I keep it on electric until just before pulling out
to save on consumption. As with most travel trailers, the rig is far enough behind the tow
vehicle at fuel stops that it would be nearly impossible for the pilot light to ignite gasoline fumes.
Good idea to check the fridge from time to time on a long trip. Sometimes mine kicks off during
transit and requires resetting. Would be foolish to run your propane and still spoil your food. (or
warm your beer)
gwbischoff
QUOTE(John Blue @ Aug 23 2007, 10:12 PM) *



Disaster telling will be around forever, like RV person making coffee on the I-5 in LA.


Ok, I'll bite...

As someone who travels the I-5 regularly, I've got to hear that one...
DXSMac
I turn it off and put the food in a "5 day" cooler.

Also, if you are travelling on a ferry, you MUST shut the propane tank off.

At least, that's the rule on the Washington State Ferry system.

JJ ohmy.gif
gwbischoff
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Sep 10 2007, 02:34 PM) *

QUOTE(John Blue @ Aug 23 2007, 10:12 PM) *



Disaster telling will be around forever, like RV person making coffee on the I-5 in LA.


Ok, I'll bite...

As someone who travels the I-5 regularly, I've got to hear that one...



I'm still dyin' to hear that story Blue...
Lucille Moulton
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Aug 22 2007, 07:00 PM) *

Ok, common sense and most people (myself included) say not to run down the road with your propane on.

Others are from the camp of "Awww shoot. You ain't gonna' hurt nuthin'".

I always err on the side of caution, but it'd be nice to run the fridge during an 8 hour drive across the desert.

So which is it?
Lucille Moulton
QUOTE(dmsscs @ Aug 23 2007, 09:07 PM) *

We always travel with the gas on the fridge, we were told that as long as the fridge was level for 24 hours before we turned it on, we could travel with the gas on, no problem. We have been doing it in our last two motor homes. I haven't heard any horror stories, yet. We sit around a lot of campfires, I'd think some one would have mentioned it by now!
Lucille Moulton
QUOTE(dmsscs @ Aug 23 2007, 09:07 PM) *

We always travel with the gas on the fridge, we were told that as long as the fridge was level for 24 hours before we turned it on, we could travel with the gas on, no problem. We have been doing it in our last two motor homes. I haven't heard any horror stories, yet. We sit around a lot of campfires, I'd think some one would have mentioned it by now!
Lucille Moulton
We always run our propane on went we drive. We turn off our hot water tank. We do not drive with our furnace on, we have a heater and air condition on the dashboard that we turn on. We travel in the off season. I would be afraid to turn off my Refrigerator and fridger. I spent alot of money on food to throw it away ever day. The conversations we have with the dealers went we buy a new RV is the refrigerator run on propane went we drive. I'm alway run back to check if the refrigerator is on or not. My vote is to drive with propane on.
HorizonQueen
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 15 2007, 06:42 PM) *

QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Sep 10 2007, 02:34 PM) *

QUOTE(John Blue @ Aug 23 2007, 10:12 PM) *



Disaster telling will be around forever, like RV person making coffee on the I-5 in LA.


Ok, I'll bite...

As someone who travels the I-5 regularly, I've got to hear that one...



I'm still dyin' to hear that story Blue...


Well... the one I heard was the guy who put the motorhome on cruise control and went back to make himself a sandwich....
(or was it make a pot of coffee?) laugh.gif
Texasrvers
Sorry to bring this up again, but I just read an article by Joe and Vicki Kieva who have written several books and who are considered to be very knowledgeable about RVing. They address the question of whether or not it is safe to travel with the refrigerator operating on propane. The article started by saying that generally you are permitted to drive with the propane on, but there are certain areas and times that require the propane to be turned off such as tunnels, some bridges, ferries, fuel stations, etc. They say that today’s refrigerators are built to be operated while moving and that they may even work more efficiently that way. Then they address safety. They cite instances that could be a hazard such as collisions, road vibrations causing a propane line to rupture, open flames igniting fumes at a gas station, but they also state that incidences of propane fires are relatively rare because of the safety devices installed on today’s RVs. They conclude by saying that it is likely that many RVers do travel with their propane turned on. Can this be done? Yes. Should it be done? That is a judgment call.

This seems to be pretty much the same things we said in our previous posts, but I thought I’d pass it along anyway.
HappiestCamper
The fridge in my TT only runs on propane or 110 - will not run on 12 volt. Since it takes at least 12 hours for this fridge to cool down initially, I start the propane 2 nights before a trip. I will turn it off if I go to a gas station or if the CG has 110 - otherwise, it's on the whole trip.

I also turn on the propane fridge for a week before Thanksgiving and Christmas, and let the turkey thaw in it - don't have enough room in the house fridge with three kids.
FosterImposters
Like other folks who have replied, we always used to travel (Class C's) with our propane on to keep the grub and beer cold. With the purchase of our first Class A, we too were warned not to travel with the LP on, use the generator. I was amazed how little fuel that generator used in a day's trip...so now that's our routine.
John S.
I have driven well over 165,000 miles in my foretravels and Bornfree and have always had the fridge on automatic. It will run on gas when required or propane. Theyare desigened to do that and that is what I use them for. I will cross the country and not stop many times or for more than a7 or 8 hours at a time and in 4 days you will spoil your food. Now what is the difference if you run propane forr your fridge or sit in a campground and run the propane. I bet you wil leave the unit in the campground and while you are driving you can hear a propane detector go off that you will miss in the campground when you turn on the propane and leave for the day.....

Oh well..
ddbradley952
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Aug 22 2007, 07:00 PM) *

Ok, common sense and most people (myself included) say not to run down the road with your propane on.

Others are from the camp of "Awww shoot. You ain't gonna' hurt nuthin'".

I always err on the side of caution, but it'd be nice to run the fridge during an 8 hour drive across the desert.

So which is it?


This is a DUMB QUESTION with an OBVIOUS ANSWER!!! DUH!!

I own a mobil Steam cleaning fleet so I have a thorough background and understanding of the propane systems, components, etc, thus, I feel qualified to make an opinion here.

*Propane delivery trucks run on propane
*Schwann's Ice cream trucks and all their refrigeration systems run off propane
*In the 19-80's, Propane powered vehicles was very popular.
*Some Motorhomes today run off flex fuel, gas and LP.

Obviously, if it was dangerous, the last person earth doing this would be the delivery trucks owned by the LP disatributor, Thus, we can safely conclude it equally safe to have your LP Gas on as it is to have your gasoline tanks turned on. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has specific recomendations and guildlines regarding this subject and ALL RV LP tanks MUST HAVE A DOT CERTIFICATION to be sold.

Now, to understand the mechanics of LP in mobil applications, lets look at how the system works. First of all we have the tank itself. Inside the tank is a safety device known as Overflow Protection Device (OPD) for short. This prevents overfilling which could over-pressurize the system. Second, the on/off valve itself has an "Excessive Release" shutoff device. This device will sense when excessive release occurs (such as in a colision or car broadside accident) and will internally plug up the gas valve internally thus shutting down the tank. These 2 devices occur regardless if you are drawing vapor or liquid gas(Liquid LP is used as motor fuel while vapor is used for your furnace, refrige, stove, etc).

The next systems we have is the actual lines or hoses coming from the tank as well as the propane tank pressure regulator. A mobil tank is required to have a 2-stage pressure regulator where as a stationary tank (like a gas grill, etc) is not. If you look at a gas grill, you will see that the regulator(the round thing just off the tank) has only one bump whereas the regulator coming off your mobil RV tank has 2 bumps. This is a 2-stage regulator and what it does differently is this; when a mobil tank is being sloshed around as you drive down the highway, occasionally, liquid LP gets splashed into the propane lines designated for vapor. In a 2 stage regulator, the first stage regulates the liquid into a vapor while the 2nd stage regulates the high vapor pressure down to the correct pressure of 11inches of water column.
If you have a trailer, you may not have a 2 stage regulator if not required because trailers have upright propane bottles where as motorhomes have horizontal Belly tanks. If you are worried about liquid getting into your system, switch to a 2-stage regulator[u]

So, if a propane delivery company leaves his tank on, it's because of safety modifications that have been made. If your tank receives a direct hit in an accident, the tank is designed to self seal itself etc and prevent gas leaks and explosions. The 2 stage regulators prevent the other problem of liquid LP getting into the lines which can seriously damage yor propane appliances.

Several other interesting and helpful articles may be found under this writers username.

Click to view attachment
ddbradley952
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Aug 22 2007, 07:00 PM) *

Ok, common sense and most people (myself included) say not to run down the road with your propane on.

Others are from the camp of "Awww shoot. You ain't gonna' hurt nuthin'".

I always err on the side of caution, but it'd be nice to run the fridge during an 8 hour drive across the desert.

So which is it?




***************EXPLODING PROPANE REFRIGERATORS*************


Shut your tank off when filling to prevent over pressurizing the appliances on hte other end of the lines.

Next, the issue of exploding refrigerators was not a from propane gas, but from a refrigerant leak caused by a hairline crack in a weld on the refrigeration tubes.

Norcold and Dometic had a recall from a problem that went as follows. The 120 Volt AC element was originally 325 watts. They decided to make the element bigger, 350 watts. Either this excessive heat or a defect in the welding of the coolant bowl caused a hairline crack in a percentage of these 350 watt units. The flammable refrigeration gas inside the coils could then leak out of the crack and the refrigerator would then stop working. If there was an ignition source (pilot) and the refrigeration leak was large and fast, the refrigeration gas could ignite.

Those two values could virtually only happen when you abruptly went from the AC Electric mode to the propane mode as if when you pull out of the campgrounds and unplug the shoreline cord and your refrigerator was in the automatic mode. You still would need to have the incorrect (recalled) 350 watt element.

What's somewhat reassuring to know is a simple law of physics that goes like this; Heat cracks generally occure from excessive and uneven heating of a brittle surface. Glass is a great example of this because we all have seen the glass blower heat glass to melting without breaking. He can only acomplish this by heating the glass evenly. Therefore, we could conclude the following: If the refrigerant controls in the back side (the hot side) were very cold (like in fall or winter) and the electric element in question were turned on, the likelihood of a crack would be greater than any other time in using the refrigerator. You still would have to then suddenly switch to the propane mode at the near-exact time the crack occured and the crack would have to be great enough to expell enough refrigerant gas to ignite. If it was windy outside or you were drivinf down the highway, the air circulation should disrupt the ignition through ventilation.

The only way I possibly could see this coincidence occuring is this: Suppose you were pulling your Motorhome (Trailers don't count in this scenario) out of storage and you wanted to run your roof by running your generator. The refrigerator is in the automatic mode and defaults to run on the AC mode. Then, the poor individuals who happen to have the defective refrigerators missed all the recall buletins sent out by the US Hiway Department, happens to either switch the refrigerator to gas (LP) mode or turn off the generator at the exact time a huge crack occurs, BOOM!

Click to view attachment

Pretty unlikely. I think I would do better worrying about black cats walking in front of me(or my motorhome) or walking under ladders or breaking a mirror somehow!

Norcold only had 360 units in question, Not sure about dometic. Google it for further info.


Other helpful and informative articles can be found under this writers name.
HappiestCamper
Leaving early in the morning, and my fridge won't stay lit - so this trip it will be off.
FosterImposters
QUOTE(HappiestCamper @ Mar 21 2008, 06:58 PM) *

Leaving early in the morning, and my fridge won't stay lit - so this trip it will be off.

cool.gif Ah come on...live dangerously!
Parkview
biggrin.gif

I am currently on my 5th motorhome and have always travelled with my refrigerator on with no problems as to safety. However, I had an experience with the last MH I owned that caused some cosmetic damage to the outside of the rig. While travelling in some very high winds, the flame from the propane burner, scorched the fiberglass gel coat in about an 8 inch radius around the vent cover of the outside refrigerator acces door. Try as I might, I was never able to completely remove all of this discoloration. I am only guessing as to the exact cuase of this, but I could only come up with the high wind as the only variable from the thousands of other trips we have taken without experiencing this problem.

I haven't learned my lesson though as I still travel with my regerator on LP in the summertime because it cools better, especially in the 100 degree plus heat of the western deserts.



gwbischoff
QUOTE(ddbradley952 @ Nov 12 2007, 07:02 PM) *

This is a DUMB QUESTION with an OBVIOUS ANSWER!!! DUH!!


Click to view attachment


Sorry. We all don't have Mechanical Engineering Degrees.

I just bought the thing, I didn't design it.

I was specifically told by two different people (TT and RV dealers, mind you) on two different occasions that I shouldn't travel down the road with the LP on (and judging from the responses in this forum, I'm not the only one). After talking with others and finding that some people leave it on, I asked a seemingly simple question.

Yes, I know there are vehicles that run on LP. But even I know the difference between an internal combustion engine and something that runs on the principal of an open flame.
DXSMac
My RV dealer told me that it didn't matter. If someone should happen to plow into your RV on the side with the propane tank, it will cause just as much damage if it's on or off.

However, I also am cautious and make sure it's off. If you ride a WA State Ferry, you MUST turn it off.

JJ
Butch
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Mar 24 2008, 11:24 PM) *

My RV dealer told me that it didn't matter. If someone should happen to plow into your RV on the side with the propane tank, it will cause just as much damage if it's on or off.

However, I also am cautious and make sure it's off. If you ride a WA State Ferry, you MUST turn it off.

JJ


Propane is not allowed when using the tunnel systems in the New York City area, therefore Rvs are not allowed. They can use the bridges but must use the upper road levels with the tanks "off".
Trentheim
It sounds like it is time for a bit of education from a couple of unbiased sources. Check out the following two links:
http://home.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm
and
http://www.rvtowingtips.com/propane.htm

Now take a deep breath and think about you and your RV. From the reading, it is fairly obvious that turning the propane on while motoring down the highway is pretty safe. It's also pretty obvious that it MUST be turned off prior to fueling up at a gas station. Some bridges and all tunnels require that it be turned off.

So... depending on where you drive, you could potentially be turning the propane on and off so much that you significantly delay your trip.

If your motorhome isn't the newest you should probably consider the condition of the propane burner elements in the refrigerator too. If it's older, chances are its somewhat to significantly worn.

So use your head and think about what you should do. Short trips won't require much "maintenance" refrigeration since the unit should stay cold enough (just like an insulated cooler). Longer trips might need to be assisted either with the propane or with an ice bag.

The real decision maker might be the price of propane. I think a bag of ice is probably a bit less expensive (and easier to obtain sometimes) than a refill of propane. And you don't have to turn off a bag of ice to go over a bridge.
DXSMac
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Mar 25 2008, 06:28 AM) *

The real decision maker might be the price of propane. I think a bag of ice is probably a bit less expensive (and easier to obtain sometimes) than a refill of propane. And you don't have to turn off a bag of ice to go over a bridge.


Five Day Cooler purchased from Wal-Mart. Just take a chlorox jug, fill it up with water, freeze it, and put it in the Five Day Cooler. Works fine! Of course, it's a pain to have to "stash" the cooler once you are set up..... (some RV parks won't let you put stuff outside, esthetics, you know....)

JJ
Markfoto
In general, you should not have a problem with the propane on. I have never heard of a problem either. I guess, by that logic, you can smoke at a gas pump too, or use your cell phone while refueling. But if there is a traffic accident, you could really endanger yourself and others. Your fridge is basically a glorified cooler; it should keep things cold for a days drive. Or fire up the genny, and let that cool it. We should have a thread to update all of us when you guys are traveling, so we can be sure to avoid those roads.
PATHFINDER AND RAINBOW
WE HAVE FOUND THAT ONCE THE REFRIGERATOR IS COLD; AS LONG AS WE DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR DURING TRAVEL; THAT FOOD STAYS COLD ENOUGH WITHOUT THE PROPANE. SINCE WE RARELY DRIVE MORE THAN 6-8 HOURS, IT'S WORKED FINE FOR US FOR YEARS.

I HAVE ALSO, ON OCCASION, PUT A ZIPLOCK BAG OR 2 OF ICE FROM OUR ICEMAKER INTO
THE VEGGIE BINS OF THE REFRIGERATOR TO HELP KEEP IT EVEN COOLER DURING TRAVEL.

WE'RE NOT COMFORTABLE DRIVING WITH THE PROPANE ON.

HAPPY TRAVELS!
RAINBOW
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(FosterImposters @ Mar 21 2008, 11:45 PM) *

cool.gif Ah come on...live dangerously!

You mis-read - something is wrong with mine and it won't light - so I had to travel with it off. Normally, it's on the entire trip unless I'm fueling or if the CG has 110.

It did work on 110 when I got to the CG, so I guess I'll be putting in the shop (after I call the locksmith because I couldn't find the keys when we got home an hour ago - DOH!!!!!)
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(HappiestCamper @ Mar 27 2008, 09:52 PM) *

You mis-read - something is wrong with mine and it won't light - so I had to travel with it off. Normally, it's on the entire trip unless I'm fueling or if the CG has 110.

It did work on 110 when I got to the CG, so I guess I'll be putting in the shop (after I call the locksmith because I couldn't find the keys when we got home an hour ago - DOH!!!!!)


In the daylight the next morning, I discovered what that big noise I heard while backing in. I thought it was just the sound of a boxwood being snapped. Turns out there was a garden hose in the bush that got wrapped around the sewer connection, and had ripped it all out. The grey water tank is okay, but the black water tank has to be replaced, along with a new connection from both.

Paid the locksmith $55 to open the door. Got the estimate yesterday for changing the lock, fixing the igniter on the fridge, and all the sewer stuff - $1,352 ohmy.gif

Okay, when are those checks supposed to arrive in May for my economic stimilus biggrin.gif
Terry10
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Aug 22 2007, 06:00 PM) *

Ok, common sense and most people (myself included) say not to run down the road with your propane on.

Others are from the camp of "Awww shoot. You ain't gonna' hurt nuthin'".

I always err on the side of caution, but it'd be nice to run the fridge during an 8 hour drive across the desert.

So which is it?


I have never heard tha rule before. I figure there is a reason for the refrigator being both electric/propane. I am a full-time RV'er and when I am not hooked up to shore power in a campground my propane is ON!! Running down the road to a new destination or simply boondoggling if I am not running the generator or hooked up to electricity the propane operates the refrigator.

I know some people who empty their refrigators before starting on a trip. I am not one!! My refrigator is always full. I keep ice in the freezer along with meat and frozen foods. I keep cold drinks including milk in the refrigator and they all need COLD
DXSMac
QUOTE(Terry10 @ Apr 27 2008, 10:05 PM) *

I know some people who empty their refrigators before starting on a trip. I am not one!! My refrigator is always full. I keep ice in the freezer along with meat and frozen foods. I keep cold drinks including milk in the refrigator and they all need COLD


Um..... if you ever travel on a ferry, you MUST turn the propane OFF.

I keep a 5-day cooler in my RV. I carry the foods in it until I get to my destination and get the fridg cold.

JJ
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(HappiestCamper @ Apr 10 2008, 10:02 AM) *

In the daylight the next morning, I discovered what that big noise I heard while backing in. I thought it was just the sound of a boxwood being snapped. Turns out there was a garden hose in the bush that got wrapped around the sewer connection, and had ripped it all out. The grey water tank is okay, but the black water tank has to be replaced, along with a new connection from both.

Paid the locksmith $55 to open the door. Got the estimate yesterday for changing the lock, fixing the igniter on the fridge, and all the sewer stuff - $1,352 ohmy.gif

Okay, when are those checks supposed to arrive in May for my economic stimilus biggrin.gif


After 2 months (and one day) in the shop, it's finally home. $200 under estimate. Though the first thing they did was fix the fridge, let it get cold, then turned it off (with the door closed). Now I get to clean up two months worth of mold. mad.gif
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