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leok22
I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.
Lindsay Richards
You may not get representative opinions here as everybody is a computer user where everybody using RV parks are not.

I have had about 4 or 5 password problems as the owners do not understand computers. The password and procedures should be printed on a card and handed out. Poor signals are very common and I hate to have to go to the office to use it. I am doing banking ETC thru secure sites, but I donít want to have somebody looking over my shoulder while Iím doing it. I even bought a handheld WiFI detector. I am of the opinion that any cost is too much. It should be looked at as a way to increase occupancy, not as an additional income stream. WiFi and WiFi charges are usually a deciding factor in choosing a park. WiFi in my coach is important. I would like to see truck stops offer free WiFi. My minimum fuel bill is at least $100 and usually much higher. Why should I have to pay an additional $2.00 for WiFi that is good for 24 hours when I will be leaving in 20 minutes?
leok22
QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Sep 17 2007, 05:49 PM) *

You may not get representative opinions here as everybody is a computer user where everybody using RV parks are not.

I have had about 4 or 5 password problems as the owners do not understand computers. The password and procedures should be printed on a card and handed out. Poor signals are very common and I hate to have to go to the office to use it. I am doing banking ETC thru secure sites, but I donít want to have somebody looking over my shoulder while Iím doing it. I even bought a handheld WiFI detector. I am of the opinion that any cost is too much. It should be looked at as a way to increase occupancy, not as an additional income stream. WiFi and WiFi charges are usually a deciding factor in choosing a park. WiFi in my coach is important. I would like to see truck stops offer free WiFi. My minimum fuel bill is at least $100 and usually much higher. Why should I have to pay an additional $2.00 for WiFi that is good for 24 hours when I will be leaving in 20 minutes?



Thanks a lot, that is great info. I agree with you with regard to the costs of WiFi - we try to provide the best service we can within what the park owner is willing to spend.
paulandholly
Greetings,

I agree with the previous post - train the RV Park Staff so they can handle little problems 24/7. Wifi is important to us but we got so disgusted with so many inferior signals and "oh, our wifi is only available in the office" - it's almost like false advertising. It makes us crazy so we got a Verizon air card which has been reliable and sometimes it's even high-speed. One park in Albuquerque (American RV) used to have a pay wifi system - great signal, reasonable cost and always on. The next time we visited - they proudly announced "free wifi". Fine, but we stayed there 10 days and never did get a signal. I'd rather pay for wifi and get on than have free wifi that doesn't work!! Us wifi enthusiasts are ahead of the curve, I'm sure that things will improve in a year or so, until then we will just have to do the best we can.

Thanks for caring about us!

Holly T.
RLM
God, this thread is full of whiners.

Leok22> The idea that Wi-Fi access in a campground should be free lacks a basic understand of being in business for a profit. Nothing is free. Let me repeat thatÖnothing is free. The cost of doing business is always added to the cost of whatever one is purchasing. The water and electricity used at a campground site is always factored into the cost of the overnight stay. Wi-Fi systems are likewise an expense added to oneís cost for camping whether or not it is detailed in the final bill. I am not a campground owner, but just for the record to those who would refute my comments, I have been a business owner and have a degree and background in Business Administration and Management.

Those that donít need or care about a Wi-Fi campground system far outnumber those of us who would take advantage of it if offered; whether or not it is free or fee based. As a devilís advocate, why would they want to pay more for the campsite just because the cost of doing business for YOU, the free Wi-Fi user, has increased?

I would suggest that extremely few RVers know how much a complete campground wide Wi-Fi system cost the owner. If you donít, then it might be possible that your position that it should be free is in error. And don't dump on the unformed campground employees. If you were in their shoes, you might be just as uninformed as they are and your superior than tho attitude would not be appreciated.

However, I fully agree that a campground that advertises Wi-Fi has a responsibility to provide that service to each and every site.

So Leok22, let me answer your inquiry with some common sense.

1-The top problem is that the campground owner cuts corners and the system does not have enough omni-directional antennas and relays to supply high signal strength to the entire park. Iíd suggest that is the major complaint of users.

2-I normally rely on a cell wireless data card for internet connections, but Wi-Fi is one of the discriminators I use to select a campground. If it is faster than my data card then I have no problem with paying a nominal fee for that convenience.

3-I donít have the time or inclination to spend the time at a truck stop to connect to Wi-FI. You are probably aware than many state rest stops are going to Wi-Fi. If one wants to delay their travel time by stopping at a truck or rest stop then thatís a personal choice. I suspect it isnít a part to the normal RV travel plans.

Campground owners are usually ignorant to specifics of this technological innovation. Itís your job to convince them that a first class system is the way to eliminate the negative comments that youíve read here. First class service always cost a little extra even if it isnít on the final bill.
riggarob
QUOTE(leok22 @ Sep 17 2007, 05:17 PM) *

I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.


Interesting post.

1. Advertising WiFi, and then having to go to the office, and set in the gift shop to use it, (Happened to us in Cody, WY) is a very misleading ad.

2. WiFi is a very big factor in deciding on an RV park for us. If you're going to use it as a come-on, have it available to all sites, or say it's just in the gift shop !!

3. Yes. Sometimes we just like to stop, fill-up, eat, and check our emails.

Now, having answered your questions, we've gone w/ a Sprint broadband card. I was so pi??ed at one point, we were actually going to get a Hughsnet dish for the top of the coach ! 5K, I didn't care, as long as I could get internet. Also, I disagree w/ the poster who said that it is costly to have WiFi to all sites. All you need is a few repeaters, and your done. Don't use that old tactic of saying you have something, and then the customer finds out that, while true, only meets the basic of requirements. State the facts.

Thanx for the inquiry.
JDOLLEN
QUOTE(leok22 @ Sep 17 2007, 02:17 PM) *

I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.


A little back ground. This is our first year RVing with our lap top. We have just completed a tour of the North West and stayed at nine different parks. Some were just overniters others we spent three or four days at. We did not have a schedule or a predetermined route.

What bothered me most was not really an additional cost to use WiFi but most of the RV Parks used different providers. I would much rather pay a "Premium" built into the cost of my stay for "free" WiFi than setting up a new account when I move.

Of the nine parks we visited all but two provided WiFi service. WiFi was a deciding factor on where we stayed as we relied on it's use to choose and or reserve a site for our intended next destination. Of those parks that did offer WiFi we found only one to have a weak signal (and that service was not provided "free". Further, it was at one of the most expensive parks we visited).

I have no idea what it might cost the park operator to set up a WiFi service however I suspect it can't be too costly. We found "free" WiFi at parks where the park use fee was as little as $30.00! Rogue Valley Overniters in Grant's Pass, Or and Redcrest Resort in Redcrest Ca. Both fairly small operations.

I hope in the future WiFi "built in to the cost of a nights stay" will be as common as P W & S.
hrrvr
I'm going to jump in on this, knowing full well I'll probably get blasted!

Wi-Fi is not an inexpensive item for a park to provide and maintain. This year alone, I have spent $6655.12 keeping our system up to date and adding another access point so that all sites have coverage. We do not charge for the W-Fi, but it has to be reflected in the rates to cover these costs. It IS part of doing business.

Repeaters are not always the answer, as repeaters did us no good in trying to provide the coverage. The additional access point did make the difference. Total cost to make that addition: $2631.69. We did encrypt the system after that installation, as we found the neighbors in the housing development across the street were enjoying our free wi-fi. This takes bandwidth away from our guests. We found out after we did the encryption that the teens across the street were using our system to download music to their iPods.

The repeaters did not give us additional strength when trying to put the signals through 2 or 3 motorhomes before it got to your computer. So yes, sometimes the signal is better when sitting at your picnic table without having coaches cutting the signal down. The additional access point provides better coverage by being on top of the laundry/restroom facility directly behind my pull-through section.

All of my employees are workcampers, some with no computer knowledge to speak of, some with limited knowledge, and a couple very capable of helping guests......if the guests will listen to them. That is the biggest problem with people who can not get on the system. When everybody else in the park is getting on, but they are not, it is something in their system, not ours. I am available in the park 24/7......for emergencies. Someone not able to access the wi-fi is not, definitely not, an emergency. Questions about wi-fi access need to be brought up during business hours.

Wi-fi is a great thing, and it is a great amenity. But it can be a pricey amenity for the park to offer. If a park is charging for the use or if their overnight rate is a little higher than the next guy's, it's all a part of trying to make ends meet. We understand the importance of wi-fi to our guests and make every effort to have the system operating properly. Lucky for me, my son owns a network management company, and he will help us out at the drop of a hat. If we have to call the company that installed everything, they are 70 miles away, and we may have to wait 2 or 3 days before they can send someone over. Regretfully, that, too, is part of doing business.
AceFace
>>1. Top Problem<<
low signal stregnth but I bought a Hawking Hi-Gain HWU8DD usb Wireless-G Adapter that is directional and usually give me enough signal stregnth.

>>2. Is WiFi a deciding factor <<
YES - Big time
I would rather a park have a cheap system then no system. We can rate their wireless system here.

>>3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?<<
No
MaineDon
The biggest problem we've encountered with WiFi is poor/weak signals. We travel for 2-3 months each year, so on-line access is important to us. And it is something that we consider when selecting a park. I agree with others that many RV park managers have little idea of how their system works, or how to trouble shoot problems. We ended up using public libraries on a number of occasions last spring and early summer. Advertising WiFi and then (as someone said above) having it available only in the camp store or gift shop does not "win my heart."
leok22
Thanks again to all the responders, this is very helpful.

As far as pricing for WiFi, my experience has been that most resort owners prefer to have us pay for the system by charging guests instead of the park. As a WiFi company our focus is to provide great service and we don't necessarily care who pays us for it.

It is true that Industrial Grade WiFi is expensive but I think the resorts that spend the money up front for great service end up making it back many times in low maintenance costs and happy customers.

Most places where we have installed are pay WiFi but the users don't mind that because the systems actually work. As a traveler I prefer free WiFi in large part because users don't have to go through a sign up process.
Lindsay Richards
QUOTE
The idea that WiFI access in a campground should be free lacks a basic understand of being in business for a profit. Nothing is free.


Having been in the lodging business for over a decade and having provided FREE WiFi for the last 5 years, I can tell you from personal experience that providing FREE WiFi is in fact, a very good business practice. It is an easy and cheap way to increase Occupancy Rate. The actual cost of the WiFi is very small compared to the additional money it makes you. If having free WiFI and donít charge the $2.00 or so and the revenue for an additional $25 or $30. This additional business is called incremental revenue (Revenue that you would not otherwise have.) and can go to paying off the fixed cost of the operation. Which can be huge. Advertising is similar. We recently completed a 3 month trip on the eastern US and never stayed in a campground that was full. We stayed in many that had free WiFI instead of staying in ones that didnít have WiFi or had charge WiFi. I have noticed that Free WiFI is becoming more and more common in campgrounds and hopefully it will be an expected amenity just like water and electricity. Those owners were glad to get the rate for their otherwise empty site and would not have knowingly given it up for the $2.00 WiFi fee.
Lindsay Richards
QUOTE
It is true that Industrial Grade WiFi is expensive but I think the resorts that spend the money up front for great service end up making it back many times in low maintenance costs and happy customers.


Thank you for your info. After installation, what would be the total cost for a say 200 site park for a year. I guess this would include upkeep and fees to the internet provider. I know my brother is a site owner in a condo park in Florida and they charge $2.00 per day or $20 per month and say that this is breakeaven on the monthly rate.

Thanks
leok22
QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Sep 18 2007, 09:14 PM) *

QUOTE
It is true that Industrial Grade WiFi is expensive but I think the resorts that spend the money up front for great service end up making it back many times in low maintenance costs and happy customers.


Thank you for your info. After installation, what would be the total cost for a say 200 site park for a year. I guess this would include upkeep and fees to the internet provider. I know my brother is a site owner in a condo park in Florida and they charge $2.00 per day or $20 per month and say that this is breakeaven on the monthly rate.

Thanks



It depends on how much service the campground wants. My guess would be between $4,000 and $5,000 per year for a "full service" hotspot. That would cover hardware replacement, guest technical support, a good internet connection to feed the system, preventative maintenance, etc.

If the campground adds 190 one night stays at $25/night that would add $4,750 in revenue for the owner. Out of a total of (200 sites x 365 days) 73,000 possible one night stays in a year this seems like a fairly conservative estimate. Even if the campground gets no more than 190 extra stays the added property value that an industrial grade system brings is probably well over $15,000 if the owner ever decides to sell.
Lindsay Richards
Wow, that is a lot more than I had thought. From what I see walking around in campgrounds and talking to people, lots of people are using WiFi and it is becoming almost a necessary amenity. I recently bought a handheld WiFi detector and have been amazed at how many open sites there out there in shopping centers and such. As a necessity for bill paying and business type usage, this is sufficient for me. I tend to think of in coach usage as pleasure surfing instead of reading, TV, or heaven forbid talking to the wife.

Is the $2.00 going straight to the service provider (like you) or does the campground owner get a cut. (I am talking about the ones where you sign on and get a intro page where you have to put in your CC number to pay the $2.00 to continue ) I have heard both ways from campground owners. One thing I would like to see a standard practice is to have the payment cover 24 hours rather than one day. If I check in at 4 PM and want to use the WiFI again the next morning at 7 am, sometimes they want another fee even though it hasnít been 24 hours. I have been hearing for years about this new kind of WiFi that Wal-Mart will have that goes for about 30 miles or so. That would b har on your business.
Texasrvers
To answer the 3 original questions:

1. All of the examples have been a problem for us at one time or another with the most common being weak signal (dropping the connection).

2. If we're just staying overnight we can do without it, but if we are staying for several days I will always pick a place that has it.

3. We probably would not use WiFi at a truck stop, but we have logged on at Texas state rest areas when we have stopped for lunch.

Other comments:

We prefer that the service be free (even if it is ultimately built into the nightly fee). We don't mind paying a small fee, but when it goes over $3 or so we usually do not use it. We agree with Lindsey that the fee should be for a 24 hr period, not a calendar "day."

We prefer not to have a third party provider. As someone else said that usually means setting up an account and giving a credit card number online. While this can be safe we prefer not to do this. We would also be upset if we paid a fee but did not get good service.

We prefer to be able to log on from our coach, but we would still stay at a park even if we had to go to the office or other location to get a signal.

That's my 2 cents.
leok22
Costs are high for campgrounds (as opposed to other businesses) because they exist in harsh outdoor environments. One lightning storm can fry thousands of dollars in equipment and leave a provider months behind pre-set revenue requirements.

In most cases the resort owner gets some sort of cut of the revenue. Some resorts have systems that they handle completely by themselves - with varying degrees of success. If a resort takes all the revenue from a system it makes them responsible for ALL of the problems that come with it and service usually (although not always) suffers. A resort that provides its own internet service is basically becoming an ISP for a small town. If they have the technical knowledge in their staff and/or residents they may be able to get by but most are better off focusing on what they do best - that is creating a nice RV resort, not getting into the telecommunications business.
Tardis
Well this is an interesting topic. We are new to RVing and probably come at it from a slightly different angle. For a start we're English so we are used to poor service!! We have been travelling for the last 3 months in Canada (BC, Yukon and Alberta) and Alaska and have had a variety of experiences with WiFi. We need internet access on a regular basis as we have a business in the UK but, because ourcell phones don't work in many of the places we have been it was pointless organising web access that way so we have relied on access at campgrounds and, on one occasion, a print/copy shop in Whitehorse.
Our experiences have, for the most part been excellent. The WiFi connections, when offered have usually been fine, we've had a few that were weak but the campground owner has usually warned us in advance and has tried to park us as close as possible to the device. However we have had one really bad experience at the David Thompson Resort near Nordegg, Alberta. We phoned and asked if they had Wi-Fi before we booked and were told that they did, it was free and, incidentally, they also said that they had cable TV. When we arrived, no Wi-Fi and no cable. We can happily live with no cable but we had checked in for 5 days and desperately needed to keep in touch with our business. The camp owner told us that they had been 'hacked into' and that the whole system was shut down to avoid further damage - he said that we could use the 'public' pc in the office at a charge of $2.50 for 15 minutes which he claimed was excellent value! After we had exchanged words he offered 15 minutes free!! In the end he agreed to 15 minutes per day free during our stay but would not give us a refund of our camping fees(which were the highest we had paid to date!) if we wanted to leave early. As the computer was very slow it was impossible to use effectively and we opted for a cheap phone card instead. A very poor level of service and the opposite of anything we have experienced to date. In the UK if you offer something you must provide it or offer a refund!
Anyway it is a very important factor in our chosing a campground and, whilst the set-up costs are high, a good system will pay for itself easily as more and more people use the internet and SKYPE to keep in touch.
We love RVing though!!
campergal
We have WiFi in our park, just got it this year and it's been put in by a 3rd party. It cost us nothing to put in, we tell our guests we have it through an independent company. We make no money off it. That leaves me free from dealing with the problems with it. For us to have installed it ourselves where we could keep the revenue it would have cost ~5,000. We have permanent spots here and they are able to sign up for 2 hrs, 3 days, 7 days or one month. So far I have had no complaints. I don't think a huge number of people are using it as, like many here have said, they don't want to pay for it. I would prefer to put that $5,000 investment in something else at my park.
Bud in Florida
First off, thanks for asking. All too often people just assume what the customer wants. We have a couple of business interests that require us to have internet access, so if we are planning on staying in a place for more than a day or so, Wifi is a deciding factor in which campgrounds we pick. I do not mind a nominal fee, like $2.00 and can see that people who do not use Wifi would rather not pay for it. But if you advertise Wifi you should have it! Maybe we need two catagories of Wifi service-- at the site-- at the office. I do not like to lug all my stuff to a separate site. Much prefer it at the coach. Nothing is worse than a weak signal where you keep getting dumped in mid stream. Seems to me that it is a growing service and I have no idea how you full-timers would get along w/o it. We have even had to find out where the public library is so we could go there and get on line. Good luck with your business.
hrrvr
leok22 hit something right on the head. We got struck by lightning 2 years ago. It not only destroyed the wi-fi, but also the security system, telephone system, computers, and TV sets. The insurance covered it all except for the deductible, but the time it took to get everything back on line was better than a year. Even though some of the wi-fi components were not fried, they were damaged, and that never showed up until later. They became weakened due to the surge, and then failed sooner than they should have.

I cringe now anytime I see lightning moving into the area!
leok22
When you have signal strength issues it is not necessarily the fault of the WiFi system. It could be the wireless adapter that your computer uses. My guess is that most of you who use this site probably have good equipment but here is the link to an external antenna that we recommend. You can use this on any WiFi hotspot and it should help with signal strength.

Buffalo WiFi Adapter

I think this unit is more expensive than others but our experience with it has been very good.
campergal
QUOTE(hrrvr @ Sep 19 2007, 08:07 PM) *

leok22 hit something right on the head. We got struck by lightning 2 years ago. It not only destroyed the wi-fi, but also the security system, telephone system, computers, and TV sets. The insurance covered it all except for the deductible, but the time it took to get everything back on line was better than a year. Even though some of the wi-fi components were not fried, they were damaged, and that never showed up until later. They became weakened due to the surge, and then failed sooner than they should have.

I cringe now anytime I see lightning moving into the area!


We also got hit by lightening this summer and lost our telephone, debit machine, WiFi and security system - the company came out immediately and replaced everything that got burnt on the WiFi and we were only down for one weekend.
RLM
This is going to be a bit of a long reply and I apologize for that up front. But I thoroughly read every reply, some twice, and am going to address the larger picture. I also considered doing exactly what Leok22ís business is so I have done the research.

I have a problem about the term ďfree.Ē Notwithstanding the credit card type hotspot, we all know that the cost of a reliable system is going to be passed on by the owners one way or another. So it seems that the issue is really one of perception and psychology. That Billboard advertisement for free Wi-Fi is a marketing tool. The same marketing concept as charging $1.99 for a trinket instead of $2. If you read any of the threads concerning the cost of installation and maintenance then you absolutely know that you are not getting it for free!

The cost of the pass-on will either be the additional cost of the campsite or handing over two bucks at check-in. HRRVR made that clear. Why is it more palatable for some of you not to actually see $2 leaving your hand?? Homebound DSL, cable, or data card high-speed connections are not free. Why would you accept that charge, but complain that the high-speed Wi-Fi service in a campground is not free? This is analogous to ďfreeĒ cable at the campground. No rational camper would think that cable expense for the owners isnít included in campsite fee, but there is a lot less objection to paying for it. LINDSEY, one has a great deal of respect for your background and expertise in your industry, but ďwater and electricityĒ are not free amenities, expected or not. Not at home, in your business, or in a campground.

The real objection should be that each service - water, electric, cable, Wi-Fi or whatever - is a pay-for-use system. Thatís the only way to be fair to everyone. It will never happen because the owner wouldnít make any money from those of us who only want a place to park overnight at minimal cost. They have to install the service whether or not I use it, and I am also being charged whether or not I use it! CAMPERGAL, perhaps you can confirm my assessment of the pay-for-use statement. And with all due respect, just because you blame the lack of quality service on the independent contactor does not mean that I believe you. Weíve heard it all too many times before.

TARDIS AND BUD IN FLORIDA isnít it ironic that a campground owner and businessman lacks the understanding of your needs?

I am a Wi-Fi user and I only replied to this issue in hopes that something I stated might be valuable to having an understanding by all parties concerned with the issue. Obviously, itís a hot button topic for all sides and all sides are represented in the thread. I only wish that SOMEONE lead the way and make it a standard that we can all stop complaining about!!!
Lindsay Richards
Leok22, thanks for the info on the WiFi antenna. We are leaving on Sat or Sunday for a 6 week trip. I donít think I will be able to receive shipment before I go. I will be looking for one along the road. Buffalo is an easy name to remember. WiMax is the correct name for that new technology I have been hearing about for several years on blogs, but not too much actual information. Is this a real technology and is it down the road?
campergal
RLM...I mucked up the quoting, but quoting you smile.gif
CAMPERGAL, perhaps you can confirm my assessment of the pay-for-use statement. And with all due respect, just because you blame the lack of quality service on the independent contactor does not mean that I believe you. Weíve heard it all too many times before.
end quote smile.gif

Actually in another post I commented on a camper who wanted a 30-amp full service site at the unserviced rate because he felt he was fully self-contained and would not be using our services. I politely told him I couldn't do that and actually ended up selling that site to a tenter who used none of the services but paid for all of them. (we were completely booked that night and only had one site available). And I agree that you might not believe me - and respect that, but I like that at least I can call someone else to get my product fixed. We have been fortunate, the service has been good this summer and we have had no complaints.
DXSMac
I do not like "pay" WiFi (unless I pay the campground directly for it, like $2 a day is my limit) because I do not want to set up "accounts" with third parties. I try to minimize the number of places that have my personal information. I tend to view "third party" WiFi as "fly by night."

JJ
BJMA
QUOTE(leok22 @ Sep 17 2007, 03:17 PM) *

I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.


problems: yes, I am considered computer literate, I hold a couple CompTIA certs, so when I need to ask a question, the park owner should know how thier system works. The WiFi seller, the WiFi installer, needs to properly instruct the park owner/employee designated as the sysop, if there are any configs that are not "normal".

deciding factor: yes. Free is prefered, and if it is not free, then I will tolerate slow access via my cell phone. I do not mind to pay extra for WiFi if that is ALL that I am paying extra, what gets my goat is to pay extra for kids, extra for pets, extra for 50A service, extra for the toad, extra for 36 feet, extra for a picnic table and so on.
ddbradley952
QUOTE(leok22 @ Sep 17 2007, 04:17 PM) *

I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.





***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************

Any camper who uses Wifi in a campground, undoubtedly has an internet connection at home and wishes they could bring it camping. I did and I was always frustrated because I like to use internet conection for planning activities as well as for finding grocery stores etc when heading out.

My wifi conection at home cost $60+ a month and the only way to add internet to the camper was with a laptop and air card costing another $60 per month. I didn't want to pay for two internet accounts since the camper gets used part-time and could not cancel my home account because the family and business has a wireless network.

I called SprintPCS and they had the solution.

I cancled my internet account at home and purchased a wireless broadband card from Sprint PCS for about $50.00 I inistalled it in my laptop and now I can bring it anywhere in the country and have reliable service.

Then, for the home network, SprintPCS just came out with a LYNKSYS router that you switch the air card from the laptop to the router and the wireless home network is up and running in an instant. I pay $59.00 a month for the service and now I have the best of both worlds.

I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.

At this point, I could care less if campgrounds offer Wifi, I got my own for the same price I had at home. Sorry dude. No, I do not work for sprint, either.
Click to view attachment
ddbradley952
QUOTE(leok22 @ Sep 17 2007, 04:17 PM) *

I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.




***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************

Any camper who uses Wifi in a campground, undoubtedly has an internet connection at home and wishes they could bring it camping. I did and I was always frustrated because I like to use internet conection for planning activities as well as for finding grocery stores etc when heading out.

My wifi conection at home cost $60+ a month and the only way to add internet to the camper was with a laptop and air card costing another $60 per month. I didn't want to pay for two internet accounts since the camper gets used part-time and could not cancel my home account because the family and business has a wireless network.

I called SprintPCS and they had the solution.

I cancled my internet account at home and purchased a wireless broadband card from Sprint PCS for about $50.00 I inistalled it in my laptop and now I can bring it anywhere in the country and have reliable service.

Then, for the home network, SprintPCS just came out with a LYNKSYS router that you switch the air card from the laptop to the router and the wireless home network is up and running in an instant. I pay $59.00 a month for the service and now I have the best of both worlds.

I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.

At this point, I could care less if campgrounds offer Wifi, I got my own for the same price I had at home. Sorry dude. No, I do not work for sprint, either.


Click to view attachment
pianotuna
Hi ddbradley,

When did you get those quotes?

I have been looking at an air card for trips to USA. Verizon seems to be at $59.00 per month now, with unlimited bandwidth.

I ruled out T-Mobile because I already have a booster antenna--and it doesn't work with their frequencies.

The Verizon coverage in the west seems better than Sprint--but it is *hard* to find a good coverage map for any of the providers.

I'd go satellite--but I want "in motion" access to the net, and the cost of the equipment is prohibitive.
ddbradley952
QUOTE(pianotuna @ Sep 27 2007, 08:28 PM) *

Hi ddbradley,

When did you get those quotes?

I have been looking at an air card for trips to USA. Verizon seems to be at $59.00 per month now, with unlimited bandwidth.

I ruled out T-Mobile because I already have a booster antenna--and it doesn't work with their frequencies.

The Verizon coverage in the west seems better than Sprint--but it is *hard* to find a good coverage map for any of the providers.

I'd go satellite--but I want "in motion" access to the net, and the cost of the equipment is prohibitive.

I got those quotes this year and signed up. Verizon is much smaller than sprint. Sprint is better.
riggarob
QUOTE(ddbradley952 @ Sep 27 2007, 06:37 PM) *

QUOTE(leok22 @ Sep 17 2007, 04:17 PM) *

I work for a WiFi company that services RV resorts throughout the country and I have a few questions for you...

1. What are the top problems you experience with wireless internet systems in RV resorts (i.e. low signal, poor support, too expensive, etc.).

2. Is WiFi a deciding factor when choosing to stay at a park?

3. Would roaming agreements with truckstops be helpful?

We have only been doing RV resorts for about a year but we have had good luck so far and would like to know how to make the service better.




***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************

Any camper who uses Wifi in a campground, undoubtedly has an internet connection at home and wishes they could bring it camping. I did and I was always frustrated because I like to use internet conection for planning activities as well as for finding grocery stores etc when heading out.

My wifi conection at home cost $60+ a month and the only way to add internet to the camper was with a laptop and air card costing another $60 per month. I didn't want to pay for two internet accounts since the camper gets used part-time and could not cancel my home account because the family and business has a wireless network.

I called SprintPCS and they had the solution.

I cancled my internet account at home and purchased a wireless broadband card from Sprint PCS for about $50.00 I inistalled it in my laptop and now I can bring it anywhere in the country and have reliable service.

Then, for the home network, SprintPCS just came out with a LYNKSYS router that you switch the air card from the laptop to the router and the wireless home network is up and running in an instant. I pay $59.00 a month for the service and now I have the best of both worlds.

I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.

At this point, I could care less if campgrounds offer Wifi, I got my own for the same price I had at home. Sorry dude. No, I do not work for sprint, either.


Click to view attachment



As of next month, We're doing the same thing. Out w/ Verizon DSL, and in w/ Sprint broadband card, and linksys wireless router, at the house and in the coach. Worked everything out w/ Best Buy the other day. rolleyes.gif
Tucsonbenz
We full time and visit hundreds (if not multi hundreds of campgrounds and RV Resorts. Here is what we have found after 3 years of full timing and having two computers.

1. We'd estimated that only 40% of campgrounds we stay in have wi-fi abilities.

2. Of those that do most have mom/pop wi fi set ups.

3. Most do not have enough repeaters in their facilities

4. We don't mind paying for good connections, unfortuantely you don't know if it's good until after you have paid

5. Many parks have trees or heavy trees and the signal does not get to all equally

6. The outbound expense by the park owner is large, but they make a huge mistake when initially installing their system by not adequately having a proper backbone computer system and/or enough antannae or enough repeaters.

7. A lot of campgrounds or resorts are rural and they don't get the necessary service they need to upgrade and/or repair their systems once installed

8. Most owners don't understand the needed daily/weekly maintenance that is requried

9. Most overcharge their consumers, instead of fairly charging and getting more to sign up

10. Training of part time employees or workkampers is virtually non existant
leok22
QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Sep 20 2007, 07:40 PM) *

Leok22, thanks for the info on the WiFi antenna. We are leaving on Sat or Sunday for a 6 week trip. I donít think I will be able to receive shipment before I go. I will be looking for one along the road. Buffalo is an easy name to remember. WiMax is the correct name for that new technology I have been hearing about for several years on blogs, but not too much actual information. Is this a real technology and is it down the road?


Sorry to be so long in responding. WiMax is definitely a concern for our industry. Within about 5 years they'll have most of the country covered and the cell phone companies will pose a major threat to WiFi providers as well as DSL and cable companies. The advantage that we have is that we will be able to beat them in price. RVers who don't stay in one place for more than a week or two will probably go with WiMax but those who stay in one place for 3 or more months at a time will probably sign up for our service if it can save them $20-$40 per month.

I am not sure where the cell phone companies are planning to price this service but I imagine that it will be somewhere between $40 and $80 per month. Our WiFi service is $20/month for users of 3 or more months.
riggarob
QUOTE(leok22 @ Oct 1 2007, 06:43 PM) *

QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Sep 20 2007, 07:40 PM) *

Leok22, thanks for the info on the WiFi antenna. We are leaving on Sat or Sunday for a 6 week trip. I donít think I will be able to receive shipment before I go. I will be looking for one along the road. Buffalo is an easy name to remember. WiMax is the correct name for that new technology I have been hearing about for several years on blogs, but not too much actual information. Is this a real technology and is it down the road?


Sorry to be so long in responding. WiMax is definitely a concern for our industry. Within about 5 years they'll have most of the country covered and the cell phone companies will pose a major threat to WiFi providers as well as DSL and cable companies. The advantage that we have is that we will be able to beat them in price. RVers who don't stay in one place for more than a week or two will probably go with WiMax but those who stay in one place for 3 or more months at a time will probably sign up for our service if it can save them $20-$40 per month.

I am not sure where the cell phone companies are planning to price this service but I imagine that it will be somewhere between $40 and $80 per month. Our WiFi service is $20/month for users of 3 or more months.


Here's some very new updates I found on Slash/Dot. Copy and paste the links at the end of the article if they aren't high-lighted. dry.gif
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+
| The Dirty Business of Assembling WiMAX Spectrum |
| from the whose-side-you-on-anyway dept. |
| posted by kdawson on Sunday September 30, @22:19 (Wireless Networ|
| http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/10/01/0121250 |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+

go_jesse writes in to make us aware of a MarketWatch article reporting on
the [0]battles that WiMAX partners Sprint and Clearwire are fighting ‚ÄĒ
sometimes with one another ‚ÄĒ to put together enough spectrum to fill in
their planned WiMAX coverage map. The problem is that decades ago the FCC
passed out licenses in what would become the WiMAX band to schools and
non-profits nationwide. Once Sprint began knocking on their doors asking
to license their spectrum ‚ÄĒ once they began seeing dollar signs in a
forgotten resource ‚ÄĒ dozens, then hundreds of these organizations applied
to the FCC to renew long-dormant licenses. The FCC has granted the first
of these requests and Sprint has asked it to reconsider. Confusingly,
Sprint's partner Clearwire has sided with the schools and non-profits.
The article sheds light in one messy corner of the battle to provide a
"third pipe" into US consumers' homes.

Discuss this story at:
http://hardware.slashdot.org/comments.pl?s...7/10/01/0121250

Links:
0.
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/vaun...BB738E8DC445%7D
pianotuna
Hi ddbradley,

I just looked up coverage for Verizon and Sprint

Here is Verizon

http://tinyurl.com/2j6agc

here is Sprint

http://www.inphonic.com/images/maps/nextel_mkt67.gif

They appear to be the same price--but Verizon seems to have much better coverage.

[quote name='ddbradley952' date='Sep 27 2007, 04:09 PM' post='8483']


***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************


I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.
riggarob
[quote name='pianotuna' date='Oct 2 2007, 06:15 PM' post='8535']
Hi ddbradley,

I just looked up coverage for Verizon and Sprint

Here is Verizon

http://tinyurl.com/2j6agc

here is Sprint

http://www.inphonic.com/images/maps/nextel_mkt67.gif

They appear to be the same price--but Verizon seems to have much better coverage.

[quote name='ddbradley952' date='Sep 27 2007, 04:09 PM' post='8483']


***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************


I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.
[/quote]



Read the tech news the other day, and it seems that Sprint is about to be bot out by Btitish Telecom. Should be an interesting developement !! dry.gif
riggarob
[quote name='riggarob' date='Oct 3 2007, 12:14 AM' post='8536']
[quote name='pianotuna' date='Oct 2 2007, 06:15 PM' post='8535']
Hi ddbradley,

I just looked up coverage for Verizon and Sprint

Here is Verizon

http://tinyurl.com/2j6agc

here is Sprint

http://www.inphonic.com/images/maps/nextel_mkt67.gif

They appear to be the same price--but Verizon seems to have much better coverage.

[quote name='ddbradley952' date='Sep 27 2007, 04:09 PM' post='8483']


***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************


I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.
[/quote]



Read the tech news the other day, and it seems that Sprint is about to be bot out by Btitish Telecom. Should be an interesting developement !! dry.gif
[/quote]


I think this may be cell coverage, and not broadband coverage
RLM
***************HEY!!! LISTEN TO THIS LOGIC EVEONE!!!************************


I compared the 3 major players in the aircard business and these were the results; T-Mobil cost $49.90 per month with an average down speed of 10k (patheticly slower than dialup). Verizon was $89.90 per month but they only covered 1/3 of hte country and did not offer the router. Sprint pcs was $59.90 per month, 1.5MB speed, offered the router, gave me the best deal on the card and has the largest digital nationwide network, they own the nextell network, us West-Quest and have arangements with AT&T as well as every other roaming partner in the country so you never get Blackouts unless you are in a cave located in Afghanistan.
[/quote]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have the Verizon data card and it's only $59/mo. I've been in just about every state except the ones on the west coast and NW area and rarely have a problem with coverage.

Regardless of company, an issue that needs to be considered is whether or not the coverage area has HIGH speed broadband wireless connection. I'm not familar with the other two company's coverage, but with Verizon the high speed broadband is typically only in cities of larger populations. Unless you have that coverage, Verizon calls it EVDO, your normal connection speed is only about 3-4 times that of dial-up.
Parkview
This topic is very interesting to me as a Park owner providing WIFI.

Some previous posters are correct that there is no such thing as "Free" WIFI. The questions for a park owner are: Do we charge the large majority of our campers for WIFI even though they don't use it? Are we able to provide it free? Believe it or not, it is not possible to provide it free in some rural areas where the access to the internet for the campground is satellite. In our park, since we do not have access to DSL or a cable signal, we have had to enlist a third party WiFI provider who does the billing and collecting via credit card on-line. We couldn't waive the charge if we wanted to. I could agree to pay the charge for anyone who who accessed the service from our location, but I would be paying for many usres who are not even staying in our park (we are adjoined by the largest State Park in Texas and two other campgrounds, whose customers regularly use the service provided by our park).

Some have cited what they think it costs park operators to install WIFI. I can tell you that we have spent over $8,000 in satellite equipment, antennas, cable and repeaters, as well as 3 different providers, in the 5 years that we have been attempting to perfect a system in our park. This is in addition to an ongoing $200 monthly charge for broadband signal through Hughes Satellite. Someday, we hope to have access to DSL through our rural telephone cooperative where I assume that we will pay a flat monthly fee for the broadband signal and can build it into our rates accordingly. But through our satellite based system, billing is based on usage and it is not possible include it as a cost of business. Some people sign up for a one day contract, some 3 days, a week, a month or 6 months, and use the remainder of their contract at other parks using the same provider after they have left our park.

Thank you for letting me add my 2 cents worth.

Doug
pianotuna
Hi Doug,

I know there are costs involved and that they are not necessarily low. What I object to is "surprise" charges. If the camp says they have wifi and there will be a fee--that's fair. If on the other hand there is a "charge" for wifi that is over and above the campground fee when they advertise as "internet friendly, or wifi enabled" without mentioning a fee then I get *upset* pronto!

As to "outsiders" using your wifi--it is quite possible to require a password to access the signal. That would tend to limit your costs. One park I visited "sells" the password for $1.00. Given that his campground has 250 sites--a buck seems to work out well for him to cover his costs. His advertising does mention the fee too.

I rarely take advantage of "free" cable tv--but it is almost always included in the price of a site at those campgrounds that have chosen to offer that service. Perhaps I should ask for a discount? or a discounted site where the cable doesn't operate?

All in all I'd rather have the wifi fee "hidden" in the campsite fee. It would be interesting to know how many folks in RV's don't have a computer with them. I suspect the number of non users is very low.

QUOTE(Parkview @ Oct 6 2007, 02:16 PM) *

This topic is very interesting to me as a Park owner providing WIFI.

Some previous posters are correct that there is no such thing as "Free" WIFI. The questions for a park owner are: Do we charge the large majority of our campers for WIFI even though they don't use it? Are we able to provide it free? Believe it or not, it is not possible to provide it free in some rural areas where the access to the internet for the campground is satellite. In our park, since we do not have access to DSL or a cable signal, we have had to enlist a third party WiFI provider who does the billing and collecting via credit card on-line. We couldn't waive the charge if we wanted to. I could agree to pay the charge for anyone who who accessed the service from our location, but I would be paying for many usres who are not even staying in our park (we are adjoined by the largest State Park in Texas and two other campgrounds, whose customers regularly use the service provided by our park).

Some have cited what they think it costs park operators to install WIFI. I can tell you that we have spent over $8,000 in satellite equipment, antennas, cable and repeaters, as well as 3 different providers, in the 5 years that we have been attempting to perfect a system in our park. This is in addition to an ongoing $200 monthly charge for broadband signal through Hughes Satellite. Someday, we hope to have access to DSL through our rural telephone cooperative where I assume that we will pay a flat monthly fee for the broadband signal and can build it into our rates accordingly. But through our satellite based system, billing is based on usage and it is not possible include it as a cost of business. Some people sign up for a one day contract, some 3 days, a week, a month or 6 months, and use the remainder of their contract at other parks using the same provider after they have left our park.

Thank you for letting me add my 2 cents worth.

Doug
Cheryl
QUOTE
All in all I'd rather have the wifi fee "hidden" in the campsite fee. It would be interesting to know how many folks in RV's don't have a computer with them. I suspect the number of non users is very low.

We don't take a computer with us. But, we also aren't retired or work from our camper. We usually are gone for 4 weeks a year. We do just fine without the computer for that short time. We do take our cell phones in case our sons (both adults) need to reach us.
pianotuna
Hi Cheryl,

As a "non computer on the road family" how do you feel about wifi being a "hidden" fee? Do you make use of cable at the campgrounds (for tv)?

I use my laptop for my gps so always have it with me while I travel. I also use skype to make calls while I'm "on the road" to avoid roaming charges (Canadian Cell phones are vicious that way).

QUOTE(Cheryl @ Oct 7 2007, 07:27 AM) *


We don't take a computer with us. But, we also aren't retired or work from our camper. We usually are gone for 4 weeks a year. We do just fine without the computer for that short time. We do take our cell phones in case our sons (both adults) need to reach us.
Parkview
Hi Pianotuna,

Ihear what you are saying, but I do not have a password to give you under a satellite based system. You create your own password when you sign up.

As for misleading advertising, I advertise heavily in the major publications, and in reviewing 100s of Ads for parks offering wifi, I can find none that state that wifi is provided for a fee, but I do find that if a park offers it for free, that fact is stated in the Ad. My Ads also mention that we have groceries, RV supplies, Propane, etc., and I think it is clearly understood by all that there might be a charge. Believe me, if it was free I would advertise it. Doug
Cheryl
No, we don't use the cable either. Although, some campgrounds you have to pay for it to get full hook-up. Do I like paying for something I don't use? No! But if it is part of the site fee, what are you going to do? I guess if wi-fi was built in I wouldn't like it either, but I wouldn't stay away from a campground I wanted to go to just because of it. There is a thread on here where some one complains that they have to "pay for the pool" they never use. In my opinion, that's different because there is no way to determine who is actually using it. The cable and wi-fi however can be. And no, we don't always use the pool, probably 9 times out of 10 we don't.
pianotuna
Hi Doug,

I'm enjoying your posts! Nice to hear from the other side of the telescope.

I don't mean to ruffle any feathers, but if you have a web page for your campground I *hope* it lets folks know all the fees they might chose to pay. No one enjoys "extra cost" surprises.

Doug, does the internet provider pay you a fee for each person who "signs up" to use the system?

I've noticed that Woodhall's does put a $ sign beside wifi if there is an additional fee for using it. As I said before I'd rather have an "all in" fee than paying for each and every service.

I can think of exceptions, of course. If a campground is in the desert and water is in short supply then pay showers make a lot of sense.

I see some campgrounds don't allow the use of electric heaters. I think those places should raise their basic rate to recover the cost of the kilowatt hours a heater might use. If the wiring is able to run an AC unit--it certainly should be able to handle a heater. If the wiring can't handle AC then the campground is not going to be very popular!

I did not stay at one desert campground in the summer of 2006 because they openly state that air conditioners are not to be used. I applaud their honesty in their web site, but as a Canadian 110 F without A.C. was not to my taste.

I don't use the pool. I don't use the club house. I don't use the laundry. I don't use the recreational facilities. I don't use the cable tv. I don't use the dog run. I do use the showers and toilet (if they are clean). I do use wifi if it is free or very low fee. I do use the modem phone if one is available. I do use the dump station. I do use the water. I do use the picnic table. I do use the electricity. I do expect the folks who are serving me to be pleasant. So far I've only had one who was a bit "burned out". If I were a tight wad I suppose I'd try to negotiate a lower fee since I don't use about 40% of what is generally offered.

I'm grateful that campground owners provide us all with generally very good service and nice clean facilities.

I apologize for wandering so far away from wifi! (I'll be good from now on I promise!)

I'd love to see your website Doug (if you have one, that is).

QUOTE(Parkview @ Oct 7 2007, 12:29 PM) *

Hi Pianotuna,

Ihear what you are saying, but I do not have a password to give you under a satellite based system. You create your own password when you sign up.

As for misleading advertising, I advertise heavily in the major publications, and in reviewing 100s of Ads for parks offering wifi, I can find none that state that wifi is provided for a fee, but I do find that if a park offers it for free, that fact is stated in the Ad. My Ads also mention that we have groceries, RV supplies, Propane, etc., and I think it is clearly understood by all that there might be a charge. Believe me, if it was free I would advertise it. Doug
pianotuna
Hi Cheryl,

I guess that the pool could have a coin operated turnstile. The dog Run could be similar--and power meters might be "spawned" on every RV site. Pay showers would be a must--and "spend a penny" would be used too!

I put what I do and don't use into the post just before this one.

I failed to mention I boondock if I can! I love low service campgrounds and low fee helps.

QUOTE(Cheryl @ Oct 7 2007, 02:08 PM) *

No, we don't use the cable either. Although, some campgrounds you have to pay for it to get full hook-up. Do I like paying for something I don't use? No! But if it is part of the site fee, what are you going to do? I guess if wi-fi was built in I wouldn't like it either, but I wouldn't stay away from a campground I wanted to go to just because of it. There is a thread on here where some one complains that they have to "pay for the pool" they never use. In my opinion, that's different because there is no way to determine who is actually using it. The cable and wi-fi however can be. And no, we don't always use the pool, probably 9 times out of 10 we don't.
Cheryl
Pianotuna,

But then that would cost the campground owner money to install all of those things. I don't complain about having to pay the fee that is posted. I know before hand what it is. If they raise the rate to include wi-fi, so be it. If I really want to go visit that area and the park has good reviews, I'll pay it. We go on vacation to sight see, we don't spend a lot of time at the campground, mostly in the late evenings. But that is because we only get 4 weeks a year (goes to 5 in 2008!). If we go for a weekend, we spend time at the campground with family that also go. I'm sure when we retire and can go for months at a time, I'll want to take the computer then.

I also don't use most of the things you don't - except we do laundry once during our trip and the machines are always coin operated. The only reason I even said I didn't like for things I don't use (cable & wi-fi) is because I was asked - by you. We have been to places that charge extra to run your air-conditioner.
Parkview
biggrin.gif

Hi again Pianotuna,

I hope I am not boring everyone with my posts from the other side of the aisle, but please remember that I have been an RVer for a lot more years than I have been an RV Park operator (30 years vs. 6). So please realize that I have a lot of empathy with most of the points discussed here. Been there, done that.

As for my website, I have tried to participate in these forums when I have time, but I have tried to keep from blatantly advertising my park. I don't know whether the webmaster will appreciate it, but since you asked for my website, here it is: ParkviewRiversideRV.com.

We do allow the use of electric heaters, but I understand why many campground owners do not. As a member of the Texas Association of Campground Owners, we have semi-annual membership meetings where we discuss items of mutual concern. Believe it or not, the concerns of our members are the same as the concerns discussed in these forums, though admittedly the proposed answers are not always the same. I have been warned by many of our veteran members that if I am going to cater to the Winter Texan Business (the PC term for Snowbirds), I had better meter and charge for electricity or else they will use electric heaters, electric skillets and microwave ovens to avoid using propane. Therefore, many parks that do not meter and charge for electricity, do not permit the use of heaters: it has nothing to do with the wiring. It has to do with the bottom line. We do not currently meter electricity and do not prohibit the use of heaters (I couldn't enforce it anyway). I do not rule out the possibility that we might install meters someday for our long term winter visitors, so we can keep our basic monthly rates low.

The Wifi provider does pay us a 30% commission on usage from our location, but I have to pay for equipment, maintenace, and broadband signal from Hughes Satellite. The Woodall's listings do include a $ sign if there is a charge for WIFI, but the advertisements generally do not state any charges but do state boldly if it is offered "Free." Everything that is customarily provide at an RV site is included in our rates, and if we ever get to the point that I can get a set dedicated monthly bill for Wifi, then I will also include that in our rates, not because I think it is right, but because it is what customers seem to want. I reiterate that it will not be "free," but you will not be able to find the charge for it.

Thanks for listening! Doug

PS - We do not have pay showers or even push button thingys.
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