Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Taking Loonnnngggg Trips
RV Park Reviews Campground Discussion Forum > RV Park and Campground Discussions > RV Park Discussions
DXSMac
I've been RV'ing for three years, and the farest I have ever gone is a place where I took two days to get there, stayed awhile, then drove back. Basically, one state over, under, whatever, from my state.

I'm planning a REALLY REALLY long trip two states down (1200 miles) for Thanksgiving. I like to limit myself to 300 miles a day because I travel with a small pet, and I stop often for it's needs (let it out of crate, stretch legs, drink, etc.). So, this will take me four days to get there, stay about three days, and four days to get back.

What I want to know is..... how do people handle this? Is it like this:

Day 1: drive, find a place, stay
Day 2: get up, unhook, drive, find place, stay
Day 3: get up, unhook, drive, find place, stay
Day 4: Get up, unhook, drive, finally arrive

Or do you build in some..... "gotta take a rest by staying two days" time?

I'm anticipating that after the second day, I may need to make a "two day" stop just to rest, and then move on, both going and coming. I'm not sure I can handle driving the RV four days in a row.

I'm 51 and in generally good health. Just not sure how to handle a trip this long.

Opinions?

JJ unsure.gif
Cheryl
We usually only stop for fuel fill ups and the occasional bathroom break. My husband is fine with driving all day (he does all of the driving), stopping for some sleep (we leave the 5th wheel attached to the truck, plug into electric, and put out the slides) and getting up to drive some more to get to our destination. We aren't retired and only get a limited time for vacation. There are others on here that have no time restraints and do things differently. Only you can decide what your endurance levels are. Ask yourself how you felt after 2 days of driving. Were you ready to "drop" or did you feel "fine".
Texasrvers
I agree with Cheryl that only you can decide on your endurance level so you might try driving for 2 days and then see how you feel. If you're tired stay another night before heading out again. Personally we do not like to drive for more than 2 days without a break, but we have done it knowing that it will give us more time at our destination. But then what's the good of getting to your destination quickly if you are too tired to enjoy it? We also only like to drive about 300 mi per day. That is not very far for some folks, but it suits us fine. In the morning we can sleep in a little, have a nice breakfast, and then pack up. If we're just staying overnight I really try to get a pull through so we won't have to unhook the tow car. (We have a motorhome.) We generally get to our next stop by 4-5pm, have some time to relax, eat dinner, relax some more, and go to bed. We have seen people arrive late at night (after 10pm) and be off at 5-6 am. I'm sure they have a reason for traveling that way, but that would not be fun for us. We are retired and can usually be pretty flexible so if we get to a stop that is interesting we might stay a little longer than planned just to see the sights. Remember RVing is supposed to be fun, so whatever your schedule is, be sure you're enjoying it.
DXSMac
Good replies, I think for this first LOOONNNNNG trip, I wil l build in some "might want to take two days" time just to be safe.

One of these days I want to drive to PA to see the Flight 93 Memorial, and that will be cross country!

JJ
rodeo2
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Sep 23 2007, 05:22 PM) *

Good replies, I think for this first LOOONNNNNG trip, I wil l build in some "might want to take two days" time just to be safe.

One of these days I want to drive to PA to see the Flight 93 Memorial, and that will be cross country!

JJ

geez guys, whats wrong with 600 mi. one day, 600 the next. are we getting too old for that ?
janmcn
Your trip will depend on the roads and traffic. We like to drive about 250 miles a day, so our day is usually: on the road by 9, stops every hour or two (two usually), lunch is a stop (eat in the rig), and off the road by 3ish. However, sometimes, if the road is good, weather good, no traffic, etc. we'll haul a__ and make 400 or so with no problems. Weather, traffic, road conditions (esp. in Nov!) will make a diff. We usually build in a day or so of slack 'just in case' if we are on a deadline to get someplace.
We routinely do "long trips"...top to bottom of US or E-W USA. We're fulltimers.
Happy Tday...
Jan
Texasrvers
"geez guys, whats wrong with 600 mi. one day, 600 the next. are we getting too old for that ?"

YES!
Lindsay Richards
We recently drove from northern Maine to South Florida in 4 days due to a health problem with our daughter and I must admit, it nearly killed us. You said you were 51. We have 12 years on you and that make a big, big difference. We never made reservations in advance and just took everything as it came. We varied our stopping time as to how we felt. We “Wal-Marted” every other night. What we do that makes a big difference is leave early and stop for breakfast after an hour or so. That really breaks it up. We stopped for lunch in the motor home and always went for a good walk. Avoid big cities. The concentration required to drive a motor home is more than a car and you must stay alert. This makes long trips much harder. Good Luck.
BBear
I'm the type of person where I'm anxious to get someplace and so I'll try and get there as fast as I can...but then when it's time to head home, that's when I find myself not as thrilled and anxious and usually takes me twice as long to get home, because I find myself stopping more and driving less...so I at least keep a few days open to accommodate my taking a loooooong time to get home from a loooooooong trip! smile.gif
Jerry S.
When I first read the initial post I was intrigued. First - by the the idea of a trip being 1200 miles through only 2 states. After checking a map, my guess is that you are going from Washington to southern California. This would mean 90% of your trip will be on I-5. For days 2 and 3, you can cruise along at 55-60 mph and only be spending 5-6 hours actually driving. If you leave by 9 AM every day and make 3-4 half hour rest stops, you will be stopping for the night at about 5 PM and have 300 miles behind you. This gives you an evening to relax and get a good night's sleep for the next 300. At almost 60, I can't imagine this being a physical strain on a healthy 51 year old.
Second - the mere fact that you asked this question makes me think we are talking more about emotional stress than physical strain. Are you taking this trip alone? All you have mentioned is "I" and pet. If so, and you lack the confidence to do 1200 miles in 4 days, take that extra day in the middle of the trip.

On the other hand, if you had said you were going 1200 miles in 3 days, I would have said take four.

Good luck and enjoy your Thanksgiving.
RLM
1200 miles in four days - times two. You won’t like the end result of four consecutive days of driving each way if you have to do it all yourself. At Thanksgiving time, the daylight is also going to be shorter.

I’m a 300 miler too, but on a long trip with specific destination, I always do 450-500 miles the first day. I also plan an extra do nothing day. Both give me a cushion in case of unanticipated delays. More than once, I’ve had to use the extra day to get to the destination.

Or you could just spend the fuel cost on a plane ticket and go in comfort. smile.gif

RE: 600 miles. Let's see now. Average 60 mph, stop for fuel, bathroom, food, and finally set up in the dark. Perhaps two 13 hour days? Old yes, but wiser than that. smile.gif
gwbischoff
QUOTE(RLM @ Sep 24 2007, 01:52 PM) *

1200 miles in four days - times two. You won’t like the end result of four consecutive days of driving each way if you have to do it all yourself. At Thanksgiving time, the daylight is also going to be shorter.

I’m a 300 miler too, but on a long trip with specific destination, I always do 450-500 miles the first day. I also plan an extra do nothing day. Both give me a cushion in case of unanticipated delays. More than once, I’ve had to use the extra day to get to the destination.

Or you could just spend the fuel cost on a plane ticket and go in comfort. smile.gif

RE: 600 miles. Let's see now. Average 60 mph, stop for fuel, bathroom, food, and finally set up in the dark. Perhaps two 13 hour days? Old yes, but wiser than that. smile.gif



Yeah, 600 miles???! Holy schnike!

That's *if* you can *average* 60mph? Have you ever tried to get out of LA on a Friday and average 60mph?

It took us an hour to get past Dodger Stadium the last trip and that's 11 miles away! Do the math on that one.

We just did a 2100 mile circle from LA to Moab, UT to Phoenix and back. Three hundred to 450 miles per day is plenty. I've never been a 'wing it' kinda' guy, when it comes to reservations. So I basically set a goal as to how far we were going to go on that day, used the reviews from this webpage, and made a reservation.

If you've gotta' be somewhere where you've got to do 600 miles a day, take a plane.
DXSMac
[/quote]
geez guys, whats wrong with 600 mi. one day, 600 the next. are we getting too old for that ?
[/quote]


You may be able to haul a__ for 600 miles in one day, but I cannot! At the age of 51, 400 is my limit and that is only if I don't have a pet along.

JJ
DXSMac
QUOTE(Jerry S. @ Sep 23 2007, 07:35 PM) *

When I first read the initial post I was intrigued. First - by the the idea of a trip being 1200 miles through only 2 states. After checking a map, my guess is that you are going from Washington to southern California.


Yeppers. The states on the east are small, 1200 miles can get you through 8 states. We have BIG states in the West.

JJ
DXSMac
QUOTE(Jerry S. @ Sep 23 2007, 07:35 PM) *

Are you taking this trip alone? All you have mentioned is "I" and pet. If so, and you lack the confidence to do 1200 miles in 4 days, take that extra day in the middle of the trip.


Yep. I'm a "solo." When I worked for a living (retired now), I made four cross country moves by myself during my career. (East to West, West to East) But all I had to do was drive a car, and stop at a hotel. That's easy! (plus, no pet at the time)

RV, well, a little more responsibility. Bigger vehicle. More to watch out for. And, I'm older. I have decided I am going to build in that extra day. I don't have a relief driver.

I was never nervous when I made the four cross country moves. But in an RV, I'M NERVOUS ABOUT IT! But I'm gonna do it!

JJ
boater
We are not full timers, but we have taken several trips of over 3000 miles each. i do all the driving. generally we try to do about 300 miles per day, stop early and after the second day stop for a day off. works well for us. Whats the hurry, and we see a lot of interesting places that would go by if we didnt stop for a day. after all many of us rv to see things and go places, not have a race to get there, besides many rvs are not rated to travel over 65 mph due to tires.
I feel that if you try to make this length trip without a day of rest, you will not enjoy yourself when you get there -too tired.
Butch
JJ,

Just a few words about our most recent travels, like yesterday. We have made this same trip several times over the last nineteen years. We left Kennebunk Maine at 10 to 10 Sunday morning for a return trip to our home after spending 24 vacation days in various parts of Maine. Normally a 5 to 6 hour trip @ about 165 miles. After having made several stops, lunch, bathroom breaks for us and our pup, we had made the trip out of Maine, across New Hampshire and started into Vermont on route nine at about the four hour mark. Only two hours to travel and we will be home. West of Brattleboro at about eight miles, the approach to Hog Back Mountain, we came to a stop, and was informed, by a Vermont State Police Officer, that an accident had occurred on the mountain, the roadway was closed, and would be for hours. We would have to turn around. Could not make a u-turn in the space so unhook the towed, back around to make the turn, hook up the towed and drive back to Brattleboro, down I-91 to Greenfield, Massachusetts and travel west on route two over the Mohawk Trail. A very slow route to say the least, curves, switch backs on the mountain climb, and the very steep decent on the other side. After seven hours I was very tired and frankly had enough driving for one day, but was about an hour and fifteen minutes from home. We chose to stop at a campground we have used previously and spent the night. A rest we all needed, and we continued our return home this morning. The point I'm making is that unforeseen circumstances and or conditions beyond your control changes ones plans, luckily we had built in an extra day. The detour was almost seventy miles, and two hours longer.
DXSMac
Boater and Butch, that is kind of what I thought. Driving an RV is not the same as driving a car and stopping at hotels.

JJ
riggarob
[quote name='Butch' date='Sep 25 2007, 12:38 AM' post='8450']
JJ,

Just a few words about our most recent travels, like yesterday. We have made this same trip several times over the last nineteen years. We left Kennebunk Maine at 10 to 10 Sunday morning for a return trip to our home after spending 24 vacation days in various parts of Maine. Normally a 5 to 6 hour trip @ about 165 miles. After having made several stops, lunch, bathroom breaks for us and our pup, we had made the trip out of Maine, across New Hampshire and started into Vermont on route nine at about the four hour mark. Only two hours to travel and we will be home. West of Brattleboro at about eight miles, the approach to Hog Back Mountain, we came to a stop, and was informed, by a Vermont State Police Officer, that an accident had occurred on the mountain, the roadway was closed, and would be for hours. We would have to turn around. Could not make a u-turn in the space so unhook the towed, back around to make the turn, hook up the towed and drive back to Brattleboro, down I-91 to Greenfield, Massachusetts and travel west on route two over the Mohawk Trail. A very slow route to say the least, curves, switch backs on the mountain climb, and the very steep decent on the other side. After seven hours I was very tired and frankly had enough driving for one day, but was about an hour and fifteen minutes from home. We chose to stop at a campground we have used previously and spent the night. A rest we all needed, and we continued our return home this morning. The point I'm making is that unforeseen circumstances and or conditions beyond your control changes ones plans, luckily we had built in an extra day. The detour was almost seventy miles, and two hours longer.

Butch, how interesting. I'm sitting here in NH, reading these posts to my co-driver wife. At 1st we both said "300 miles a day, at 51 years old, give me a break" But as we read your post we have been in a similar situations. We shoot for 400 MPD. Sometimes it's 350, others it's 450, depends on the circumstances. I'm 58, DW is 52, and both retired, sooooo....., unless it's a "gotta get there" mode, we average 400 MPD, and are pretty much ready to turn on the TV, then hit the rack. Also, our pet is a cat, so no stopping for her, OR either driver for bathroom breaks. Crazy subject, but fun.
Butch
riggarob:

We have found that hours behind the wheel, experiencing all types of conditions, are more important to us than the miles travelled. We try to travel five to six hours per day, and then pull in for some down time. Of course I'm 68 years old, and tire more easily than those days of the past. We do enjoy the travel days, and have always like to drive to wherever. Happy trails---enjoy.
DIRTDIGGLER
My wife, 2 small children, and myself are new to RVing but we have quickly learned that everything we seem to want to do is a looong way off. We don't like to totally wing it but with the kids and never knowing what we may stop to look at, we had a hard time planning our stops as one day will would go 600 miles with no effort and the next day we would do good to go 200. We have found the perfect solution for us = we got a Garmin Nuvi GPS and I bring my laptop. About an hour from the time we want to stop (usually around 4:00), my wife searches the next couple of towns on the GPS for campsites, we then get on the laptop (connected via wi fi or cell phone) and read reviews on the campsites coming up, check out the campsites website- pick one, call them to confirm and then hit "GO" on the GPS= all while without leaving the truck and when using the cell phone for a modem while flying down the road. I cant tell you how well this works for us as it lets our travel distance be flexible and still find a safe/good place to stay. The GPS really saves on turning around and we are not afraid to go to the campsites a little off the beaten path which gives us many more options.
mastercraft
We just took a trip to Montana from GA. It took us around 4 days at a little over 500 a day. We had limited time to get there. If I do it again, I would still drive the same distance, but every 2 days we would spend an extra night. That is what we did on the way back and I was more refreshed. I just don't like doing the hookups so frequently with the trailer so I would rather drive a little farther and do it less. I, like Cheryl do not unhook from the vehicle. We put the stabilizers down and go to bed. Too much work to unhook and hook up each time.
RLM
QUOTE(boater @ Sep 24 2007, 07:31 PM) *

We are not full timers, but we have taken several trips of over 3000 miles each. i do all the driving.


RE: doing all the driving. I like driving the rig, but do need breaks during the day's drive. You didn't mention if your copilot is capable of driving and setting up the rig. If not, I would suggest that. One of these days while on the road, you might get ill and need the copilot to take over in order to move you and the rig to a safe location or campground. It happened to me and thankfully my wife was very capable of handling it all.
DXSMac
QUOTE(riggarob @ Sep 25 2007, 01:37 PM) *

Butch, how interesting. I'm sitting here in NH, reading these posts to my co-driver wife. At 1st we both said "300 miles a day, at 51 years old, give me a break" But as we read your post we have been in a similar situations. We shoot for 400 MPD. Sometimes it's 350, others it's 450, depends on the circumstances. I'm 58, DW is 52, and both retired, sooooo....., unless it's a "gotta get there" mode, we average 400 MPD, and are pretty much ready to turn on the TV, then hit the rack. Also, our pet is a cat, so no stopping for her, OR either driver for bathroom breaks. Crazy subject, but fun.


If I didn't have the pet (cat) with me, I would drive 400 miles. But I stop to let the cat out of the crate to stretch it's legs. Also, I'm a solo, I don't have a relief driver! Plus, I can't drive in the dark, don't see too well. I had perfect vision when I was younger, but the "night" thing is an issue with me.

JJ
Tom and Patty
We travel back to St Louis from Fresno at least once a year. 1955 miles takes us two and one half days of driving. Our first day is usaully 800 to 900 miles, second is around 700 miles. I stop when I'm tired at a rest area. No one wants us to pull in beside them at 1:30 AM. We don't stop at campgrounds on any trip when we want to make time.
gwbischoff
QUOTE(Tom and Patty @ Oct 19 2007, 02:49 AM) *

We travel back to St Louis from Fresno at least once a year. 1955 miles takes us two and one half days of driving. Our first day is usaully 800 to 900 miles, second is around 700 miles. I stop when I'm tired at a rest area. No one wants us to pull in beside them at 1:30 AM. We don't stop at campgrounds on any trip when we want to make time.


900 miles a day?!?!

Are you flying one of the new Airbus A380's?

How does that work out? 90 mph for 10 hours? Two drivers, 9 hours apiece averaging 50+mph?
blink.gif
DXSMac
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 19 2007, 10:44 AM) *

QUOTE(Tom and Patty @ Oct 19 2007, 02:49 AM) *

We travel back to St Louis from Fresno at least once a year. 1955 miles takes us two and one half days of driving. Our first day is usaully 800 to 900 miles, second is around 700 miles. I stop when I'm tired at a rest area. No one wants us to pull in beside them at 1:30 AM. We don't stop at campgrounds on any trip when we want to make time.


900 miles a day?!?!

Are you flying one of the new Airbus A380's?

How does that work out? 90 mph for 10 hours? Two drivers, 9 hours apiece averaging 50+mph?
blink.gif



I wanna know too! I'm a solo! The last time I drove 900 miles in one day, I was "only" 42, I'm 51 now, NO WAY! Well, maybe I could in a car, but NO WAY in an RV when I'm a "solo." ohmy.gif

JJ
Lindsay Richards
I think the comment about my wife learning how to drive the coach is great, but I can not get her to do it. I even offered to have her take the driving course from Lazy Days, but no dice. She says she could do it in an emergency. Lets hope it never comes up. I don't ever like to fly 900 miles in one day. We usually hit 200 if we are lucky. Have done 1600 miles in 4 days getting back to a family emergency, but it liked to kill us both.
BBear
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 19 2007, 01:44 PM) *

900 miles a day?!?!

Are you flying one of the new Airbus A380's?

How does that work out? 90 mph for 10 hours? Two drivers, 9 hours apiece averaging 50+mph?
blink.gif


I guess it depends on one's definition of a "day"...there are technically 24 hours in a day and one could easily go 900 miles in about 19 hours, averaging 50 miles an hour.

My brother goes from PA to Florida driving straight through in about 21 hours...of course being a long-haul trucker, he's used to that type of driving. smile.gif
gwbischoff
QUOTE(BBear @ Oct 20 2007, 12:56 PM) *

QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 19 2007, 01:44 PM) *

900 miles a day?!?!

Are you flying one of the new Airbus A380's?

How does that work out? 90 mph for 10 hours? Two drivers, 9 hours apiece averaging 50+mph?
blink.gif


I guess it depends on one's definition of a "day"...there are technically 24 hours in a day and one could easily go 900 miles in about 19 hours, averaging 50 miles an hour.

My brother goes from PA to Florida driving straight through in about 21 hours...of course being a long-haul trucker, he's used to that type of driving. smile.gif


There are things I really like doing rolleyes.gif that I wouldn't want to do for that long...

I know we all have times where we need to be somewhere but that can't be fun. It sounds like a recipe for disaster.

H@ll, it's hard to keep your average speed up if you just take a pee break..
leftyf
It works like this for me. I've left Seattle at 130pm on a Friday and been sitting eating dinner in my home in Houston by 8pm Sunday. And, I've driven 400 mi, in 3 days.

I'm 57, solo, and an amputee. When I get ready to go, I roll. During the winter, I try to start looking for a place at 3pm. And, if the weather is bad, I may stop even earlier. It just depends on how I feel.

Just because you do 600 miles in a day, doesnt mean everyone should or wants to.
The idea of the RV lifestyle is to take time to smell the roses or burn up the road. It's what is comfortable for you not what some table says you should drive.

One of the best trips I've ever had was during the winter crossing a high pass on some highway in some state in the mideast. I was praying that we would get snowed in. This was the best sleep I've had in years. Watching it snow, watching satellite TV, and eating popcorn. Man, it don't get any better.

I've also had trips where I had to do 3,000 miles in 4 days. I got her done...but,, it wasn't a whole lot of fun.

Do what you are comfortable with and don't worry what anyone else says.

lefty
BBear
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 22 2007, 04:23 PM) *

There are things I really like doing rolleyes.gif that I wouldn't want to do for that long...

I know we all have times where we need to be somewhere but that can't be fun. It sounds like a recipe for disaster.

H@ll, it's hard to keep your average speed up if you just take a pee break..


LOL...he's been doing it for almost 30 years and has never had an accident. He just has the stamina and focus to drive for long periods of time...

...I on the other hand, have to stop at every rest stop on my route even if we don't have to use the facilities and after more than two hours driving at one time it's fidgit time for me, LOL!!!
Butch
To each his own, I guess the answer is- whatever works for you.
gwbischoff
QUOTE(Butch @ Oct 24 2007, 02:25 PM) *

To each his own, I guess the answer is- whatever works for you.


I mean, no offense I hope was taken. I just don't see how that is even possible. I relocated from the NJ to CA and drove myself out in a car. I just can't see doing that in an RV.

Like I said, I know we all have times where we have to be somewhere, but 900 miles a day. Bejeezuz.
Butch
900 miles a day is A LOT of miles, I once drove my car over 800 in a day and my butt was in that seat all day long, it was not a pleasure. I was young, and wanted to see some of the country, but it was from the car windows. The next day, and the days to follow were much different. In our Rv we only drive 250 max, and that is because of my age and a medical problem with blood clots forming in my legs. Sitting to long. Very dangerous.
Testudo
A little late, but I couldn't help responding to this...

Our 'longest day' was summer of 2005 (when we were still tenting) and we went from Germantown, MD to Beloit, WI -- about 825 miles.

First, I would suggest that you ditch the "anchor" and get a truck camper or a Class B [grin!]. We have a small (6.5 foot) pop-top truck camper (for just my wife and myself) on an F-250 XLT (not top-of-the-line interior, but comfortable enough on long trips). I'm 53 and we were pretty much life-long tent campers. The global warming and U.S. summer heat finally got to me, though. The RV is _all_ about the air conditioning [grin!].

Tenting from a car or pickup truck always seemed like a nice compromise to me in terms of time spent "working" (camp set-up and break-down). Now, with the truck camper, I'm kind of amazed at how fast we can get rolling each day. In a month-long trip, we probably get an extra two days doing 'fun stuff' because of the brief amount of time it takes to get the truck camper squared away. That doesn't even include the extra time we have because we don't have to backtrack from where ever we are during the day to some far off tent site. With the small truck camper, we always have all our supplies on our 'back'. When we are in some remote location, I feel sorry for people I spot out in the field that I know have big-rigs back at the campground. We have had the RV since May of 2006 (over 100 nights camping in it) and we have never taken it off the truck on the road. It is just too convenient to have it with us all day. Our biggest dollar savings has been on food -- we are not dependent on the local economy for lunch, anymore. Our camper is small enough that we can store it in our 10x20 foot garage. No small advantage since, around here, public storage is about $200 per month.

We are "right-coasters" and take a thirty-night trip out west every year (since 2005 -- last year of 'the tent'). I'm very peripatetic so the only real limitations on my tendency toward marathon driving is my wife's limited stamina and the number of daylight hours. My night vision is not so great, now, so I like to avoid driving at night.

Historically, we've easily done seven to eight thousand miles on one of these trips. I try to clear the east coast as fast as possible but it still takes us at least three days to reach the edge of the Great Basin. The first day, I try to get as close to the Mississippi River as possible. After that, I ease up a little bit and we try to take in a little 'local color' along the way. Our typical 'transit' day is about 600 driving miles. We have the smallest engine FORD offered and we try to keep our engine RPMs under 2,000, but, we have no trouble keeping up to the speed limit in our low-profile; fully-loaded vehicle. In the shoulder seasons, we have about an hour less light in the evening than in the Summer, so, getting in more than about 600 miles is challenging compared to the 650 or even 700 which we can achieve in the Summer.

Originally, once we got to our general destination, we used to try and average less than 200 miles per day. Lately, I've been trying to 'slow down'. I'm trying to spend more nights in one place and get the average mileage down to around 100 miles per day. On our recent trip, we were shooting for about 6,000+ miles and came in at 6,800 miles (we had an 'unscheduled' sidetrip of about 250 miles). When we do two-night; three-day, weekend trips close to home, I try to keep that to less than 200 miles from home.

Considering the 'anchor' that you're hauling around, I think you are doing great!!! If I can be serious, though, I'd venture to say that hauling a big rig seems to be more of a chore than a vacation when you just have a hand full of days to spend. I don't think you are missing some sort of 'technique' so much that you are maybe trying to go too far with too much in the time alloted. I realize that we are very lucky in that we can go for that 30-day block. Still, I wonder why more people don't consider smaller RVs (even shorter trailers that would be somewhat easier to jockey around). If _we_ are still happy to keep camping when our thirty nights are up, I can't imagine a smaller RV not sufficing for the weekend or few days that so many people must make-do with thoughout the year.

I can appreciate that certain types of RVs have limitations when you need to load up a _lot_ of family members, but I seldom see evidence that this is actually the case. Some people _must_ haul a lot of gear, like a full taxidermy laboratory in case they wanted to freeze-dry and stuff a roast beef, for example. But when does anyone have time to use any of those 'toys'??? When all, or nearly all, of the travel is just for a weekend or a few days, I often wonder why the owners didn't opt for a smaller RV and take less stuff from the get-go.
gwbischoff
Maybe it's just an LA thing.

Getting out of LA is a nightmare. It took us an hour just to get passed Dodger Stadium one trip and that's 11 miles away. Do the math on that one.

Coming back to LA is a nightmare, too. Our last trip back from Phoenix was great but I told my wife that I would rather drive the first 300 miles over again than the last 80. We left PHX at 7am and I had the cruise set at 65 the whole way until we hit the Palm Springs area. Suffice it to say, we didn't end up averaging 50mph. That's why I'm amazed by the 900 miles claims. I drove from my former home in NJ to Michigan City, IN (~700mi) solo in my car, that's my personal record. Traffic in and around major cities alone should be enough to knock anyone's average speed down.
DXSMac
I talked to the RV park that someone recommended to me. I was told "no cancellation charge" if I need to SLICE one day off the reservation. I'm only charged a cancellation fee if a COMPLETELY CANCEL. Cancellation policy is 24 hours.

However, the one thing I didn't like is they hit my credit card NOW for a deposit that is applied to my stay. The deposit is $34, but they told me the cancellation fee is $10. So, if I cancel, they will refund me $24 of the $34? I'll probably have to FIGHT for that $24 if I need to completely cancel! Ok, I'm locked in now.

JJ
Texasrvers
Just so you know, it is not too unusual for the park to charge your credit card now. Some do it. Some don't. Hopefully you won't have to cancel and everything will go just fine.
Lindsay Richards
You keep mentioning that you are old and then say you are 51. I thought it was a typo first. 51 is not old. I suspect that the average RV'er out there is a lot older, especially if retired. I know I have gone down hill a little since I was 51. We ae a young 63 and frequently feel we are the youngest ones in the park, espically on the weekdays.
John S.
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 19 2007, 09:44 AM) *

QUOTE(Tom and Patty @ Oct 19 2007, 02:49 AM) *

We travel back to St Louis from Fresno at least once a year. 1955 miles takes us two and one half days of driving. Our first day is usaully 800 to 900 miles, second is around 700 miles. I stop when I'm tired at a rest area. No one wants us to pull in beside them at 1:30 AM. We don't stop at campgrounds on any trip when we want to make time.


900 miles a day?!?!

Are you flying one of the new Airbus A380's?

How does that work out? 90 mph for 10 hours? Two drivers, 9 hours apiece averaging 50+mph?
blink.gif

I have driven from DC to Spokane Washington in 4 days and have driven to Mesa AZ in 4 days. I have also driven 3 800 mile days in a row and it is tiring but doable. The most I have driven is 1100 miles in a day. I will get up at 4:30 am EST and start driving like a work day and stop at 8 at night and that will cover alot of miles. No different that me drivint to work sitting all day and then driving home. I stop and take breaks and average 50 mph in 16 hour you can cover alot of ground and in 12 hours you can cover 600 miles at an easy pace and if you push the average spped to 55 you can get up to 800 miles in a day with not many more hours. Now is this for everyone. NO. If I was retired I would cover 500 miles a day in and easy 10 hours and get across the country pretty easy with no pressure. I know my dad can drive 1000 miles in 2 days and he is 79. It is all what you are accustom too doing and how you drive. I can drive further in the MH than in my truck. It is easier to drive and easier to stop and take a break. 1200 miles is a short trip by many peoples standards and as you get accustom to it you will push further and further out. A round trip with sightseeing in it to WA from the east coast can hit close to 10,000 miles and alaska is another huge trip too.
John S.
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Oct 26 2007, 10:40 AM) *

Maybe it's just an LA thing.

Getting out of LA is a nightmare. It took us an hour just to get passed Dodger Stadium one trip and that's 11 miles away. Do the math on that one.

Coming back to LA is a nightmare, too. Our last trip back from Phoenix was great but I told my wife that I would rather drive the first 300 miles over again than the last 80. We left PHX at 7am and I had the cruise set at 65 the whole way until we hit the Palm Springs area. Suffice it to say, we didn't end up averaging 50mph. That's why I'm amazed by the 900 miles claims. I drove from my former home in NJ to Michigan City, IN (~700mi) solo in my car, that's my personal record. Traffic in and around major cities alone should be enough to knock anyone's average speed down.

DC is tough too so I leave after work late and go to just outside the traffic gridlock and then get up at 4:30 am to start driving.
Joe-n-Doe
Pre RV days we always drove from 600 to 900 miles a day. The only exception was a cross-country transfer from Ventura County to Washington D.C. We convoyed both cars and only drove the minimum required 300 miles per day.

We bought our RV last year specifically to facilitate taking our mutts with us on a cross-country trip planned long before we became dog slaves. When I planned the trip, we initially had 2 deadlines 1) to be in San Diego on Easter Sunday and 2) to be in Lake Tahoe April 24th. I planned on driving 500 miles per day. Fortunately, when I did the initial planning I plugged in extra days to tool around Northern Arizona and Southern California. Those extra days permitted us to make radical changes in our itinerary.

A last minute equipment addition to our TT and an unscheduled, but long awaited removal and replacement by a landscaper of a full sized palm tree that had died resulted in a 6 hour late departure. We made it 200 miles that day and HAD to stop (our first Flying J experience). The next day we drove appx 450 miles before calling it a day at our first RV park. Day 3 we made close to 600 miles before stopping at a truck stop. Late in the afternoon on day 4 we pulled into an RV park outside of Big Bend…another long day on the road.

That evening DW, who does most of the driving, implemented a new rule…8x4 (8 hours or 400 miles whatever comes first).

Until the last leg of the trip, scheduled stops and driving time in-between equated to a day on the road and at least 2 days in layovers. An unexpected Dr.’s appointment resulted in a forced march from the Little Big Horn back to Jacksonville, FL. 4 long days later we were home. As a result we have adopted another guideline; no more than 2 straight days of driving followed by at least one brain dump day.

Our 3 on the road rules are:
1: 8x4
2: 2x1
3: Bowing without question to one another’s stated desire to stop at some of those absolutely silly roadside tourist attractions; e. g. Molly’s Doll Museum and Jack Daniels Distillery.
DXSMac
QUOTE(Joe-n-Doe @ Oct 31 2007, 02:56 PM) *

Our 3 on the road rules are:
1: 8x4
2: 2x1
3: Bowing without question to one another’s stated desire to stop at some of those absolutely silly roadside tourist attractions; e. g. Molly’s Doll Museum and Jack Daniels Distillery.


I like that. Since this is my first time driving the RV that far, I will start with a "guideline" and see how I feel, and if I can modify it.

Mine will be:

1. 8 X 3 (may modify to 8X4, see how my cat tolerates it.)
2. 2 X 1 (I think this is a good rule!!!)
3. stop at an occasional rest stop to let the cat stretch it's legs

JJ
pianotuna
Hi,

I have often traveled alone in my RV so my rules are 50 miles, stop and do a walk around the RV, next 50 stop for a coffee (which I often have in a thermos). 50 more and lunch. In the afternoon 50 and walk around, 50 for coffee, 50 stop at a rest area and check my email and check for local boondocking and/or inexpensive campgrounds.

My "hard and fast" rule is "always fill up the fuel tank" before I camp for the night. That way if I wake up early I can quietly and quickly "get down the road".

Rarely do I eat out on these trips as I prefer my own home cooking.

So far the longest day was Cheyenne, WY to Regina, SK about 1192 kilometers (741 miles for those who are metrically challenged)
BBear
QUOTE(John S. @ Oct 29 2007, 11:38 PM) *

DC is tough too so I leave after work late and go to just outside the traffic gridlock and then get up at 4:30 am to start driving.


I agree DC is tough. Depending on which direction you're going to or coming from if you want to alleviate a lot of the DC area if you're coming from PA/MD area, you might want to try taking (if you're going south) I-81 to I-66 to Rt. 17 and then that connects back onto I-95 south around Fredricksburg...a lot less traffic and a lot more scenic to boot. And, although I believe it's more mileage, it takes less time because of the absence of a lot of traffic.
John S.
Pianotuna, I like your way. I just do not stop as often but when I do stop it is for 10 or 15 mins to stretch and walk around the unit. I also fill up the night befoe so I can get on the road in the am but sometimes I have been k now to fill up first thinkg since the pumps may be empty at 430am rather than try to fill up at 8 pm. I just finished driving from TX to VA in a bit over a day> Yes I got tired the first nigt but not un til 7 or 8 pm and I started at 4:40 in the morning after dumping the tanks and unhooking. 1300 plus miles later I was at the grandkids house babysitting till way too late but it was the afternoon of the second day. The way to make time is to stop 2 times less a day but that is only good for 2 days if you are going to drive 3 or more than you need to hae those stops or you will be too tired.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.