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DXSMac
Any solo's out there? Just wondering how you manage the "challenges" of travelling solo, namely, that you don't have a relief driver. I have been RV'ing solo for four years, although I did a lot of "solo" business travel during my career. Up to now, my trips have usually been places I could drive to within a day, and hang out for awhile, then drive home, or drive to Point A, stay 3 days, drive to Point B, stay 3 days, drive to Point C, stay 2 days, etc. Up to now, I hadn't taken a trip where the ultimate destination was, say, 1200 miles away. So, for Thanksgiving, I attempted such a trip. I drove from northwest Washingtin (about an hour south of Canadian border) all the way down to about 30 miles northeast of Los Angeles, CA (no way was I driving IN Los Angeles!!!)

This trip, I was "testing my limits." I have concluded that:

A. 300 miles a day is my "limit" on a long trip like this
B. I can drive for 2 days, then I need a "chill" day.

How about any other solos? How do you deal with the challenges of not having a relief driver?

I travel with a cat (that's my kitty in the avatar picture....), and I love having him with me.

JJ
Texasrvers
There was another discussion awhile back about solo travelers. It was in the General Chat Forum and was titled "Newbie Intro With Many Questions." The last post was dated Sept. 24, 2007. The lady who started it was a solo traveler. Just thought you might be interested in reading it.
Bud in Florida
Just because there is more than one person in the RV does not mean you have a relief driver. I think the key for everyone is to just do what you are comfortable with. If 300 miles works for you then do 300 miles. For me, 400 is about all I want to do. But you got the RV to travel and enjoy-- do just that
Trentheim
I just pulled off a 600 miler in a single day. It was after visiting family over Thanksgiving and my wife and I were anxious to get home. She won't get behind the wheel, so I was solo the entire way. To make matters worse, it was a heavy traffic day and an 8-9 hour trip became a 13 hour ordeal. (Handling an RV of any size through heavy traffic in NY/NJ area was especially nice.)

It's been 4 days and I am still suffering from knotted muscles and fatigue. I have to say that 300-400 miles in a single sitting is about all I should do.

We boondocked at a Wal-Mart on the way down. This would have been very restful except for an electrical problem that delayed the trip by a couple of hours.

Being our 2nd trip, I think we did well. But I intend to follow Bud in Florida's advice and enjoy future trips. Mostly by not exhausting myself.
DXSMac
It helps to be flexible. I just got home from a long trip to Southern California (from WA state). I went to just outside Los Angeles, scared the crap out of me, no way would I go INTO LA, so I can understand about NY/NJ driving.

On the way down, I drove 2 days, took a "chill" day, and drove 2 days. I kind of followed that on the way back, except I drove two days, took a "chill" day, then drove one day, ended up in Salem, OR, and the RV park I picked was having a "buy 2 get 1 night free" special, couldn't pass it up. Basically, I just didn't want to go home. But I'm home now.

JJ
Cruiser
I am a solo traveler and fairly new to RVing. I bought a 26' travel trailer in the summer of '05. I retired in 2006 and towed it with my 2 cats from Maine to North Carolina, a little over 1000 miles. I drove under 200 miles a day because I wasn't in a hurry and I went through mountainous areas, which took longer to get up hills (I needed a more powerful vehicle, I quess). I would stay at a campground for 1 night, then another for 2 nights, etc. to break it up and do some sightseeing.

Since then, I traded the TT in for a 23' motor home. So much easier--especially being solo. It's easier to maneuver, park, etc., though I am still getting used to the height. It's a lot safer because I don't have to get out of my vehicle. I took the trip up and back to Maine again this summer and stayed in campgrounds in PA and VT. I could have done it with stopping to camp only once, but it's not a good idea to drive at dusk or in the dark in northern New England. You just might meet a moose!

I love traveling alone, though a GPS would be nice. It's not a good idea to drive and read a map at the same time!! I'm already looking to "trade up" to another motorhome. Retirement is wonderful!!
DXSMac
QUOTE(Cruiser @ Dec 1 2007, 02:47 PM) *

Since then, I traded the TT in for a 23' motor home. So much easier--especially being solo. It's easier to maneuver, park, etc., though I am still getting used to the height. It's a lot safer because I don't have to get out of my vehicle. I took the trip up and back to Maine again this summer and stayed in campgrounds in PA and VT. I could have done it with stopping to camp only once, but it's not a good idea to drive at dusk or in the dark in northern New England. You just might meet a moose!

I love traveling alone, though a GPS would be nice. It's not a good idea to drive and read a map at the same time!! I'm already looking to "trade up" to another motorhome. Retirement is wonderful!!


Do you live in your 23 foot? Or do you maintain a "Stationary" home? My first RV was a 24 foot Fleetwood Jamboree (Class C). That was a great camping RV, it drove like a tank! But not enough room to live in it. I traded up for a 30 foot Class C and lived in it for 8 months, so I know I can do it. I'm back to a stationary home, wish I kept up the "full timing."

I'm retired, too, except I do some occaional substitute teaching. I have a Magellan. Generally it works good, unless it's cloudy. If it's cloudy, can't get a signal, or you will get a goofy signal (it will claim you are on a street when you are on a freeway, it will tell you to turn left when you are on a freeway on stilts....) Some people like the Garmin.

JJ
leftyf
I've traveled alone for over 10 years. Once I get things finished with the VA, I plan on going full time-full time. I've been lucky enough to get enough $$ to get just about everything I need in an RV, excepte an automatic trash-taker-outer.

I've got generator, satellite internet, 40lb LP tanks, more holding tanks than 2 people can use, an icemaker, you name it.

I used to go from point a to point b as quickly as possible with only a couple of days for emergencies. I left Seattle Washington at noon on Friday and was eating dinner in Houston at 8pm that Sunday. I jumped up Monday morning and took for Chicago and got there in two days of pretty easy driving.

I think about 400 miles a day is more than reasonable in all but winter. The farther you go north, the earlier it gets dark. You have to remember you are not in a contest to show how fast you can go. The idea is get there safely, and to enjoy the trip. What does it matter if you drive 50 miles or 500? Whose gonna know? As I said, I've driven 500+ in a day towing a trailer...and I've done 300 or less on the same route.

Nice thing in being in one of these things is that you can make those unplanned stops whenever you want. If you set yourself up to an unrealistic schedule, it'll be you out setting up at 8pm in Louis's Roadside Inn...with no lights, in the rain, AFTER you have backed your rig into a tree that you didn't see.

I prefer the biblical approach to camping. "Seek and Ye Shall Find", in the winter I drive until around 2pm and start looking for a place to stay. If I haven't someplace by 3 then I dig out the map and check for the next rest area, truck stop or Walmart.
DXSMac
QUOTE(leftyf @ Dec 10 2007, 01:17 PM) *

I think about 400 miles a day is more than reasonable in all but winter. The farther you go north, the earlier it gets dark. You have to remember you are not in a contest to show how fast you can go. The idea is get there safely, and to enjoy the trip. What does it matter if you drive 50 miles or 500? Whose gonna know? As I said, I've driven 500+ in a day towing a trailer...and I've done 300 or less on the same route.

Nice thing in being in one of these things is that you can make those unplanned stops whenever you want. If you set yourself up to an unrealistic schedule, it'll be you out setting up at 8pm in Louis's Roadside Inn...with no lights, in the rain, AFTER you have backed your rig into a tree that you didn't see.

I prefer the biblical approach to camping. "Seek and Ye Shall Find", in the winter I drive until around 2pm and start looking for a place to stay. If I haven't someplace by 3 then I dig out the map and check for the next rest area, truck stop or Walmart.



That's a good approach! And, I have lived in both the south and the north. Yes, in the North, it DOES get dark early. (4:00 PM in Eastern Washington, it is PITCH BLACK, Western WA, more like 5:00 PM)

From my experience driving to California, I like a schedule that doesn't require me to HAVE to get up at any certain time. The 300 mile a day limit worked for me, I didn't have to set the alarm clock, I just woke up when I felt like it and drove until I didn't want to. And I have done the wintertime after dark set ups! When I had my first RV, I didn't have leveling blocks. I tried EVERYTHING to get level. I even used my hands to dig up gravel to stack it up. Then I got the lynx blocks.

JJ
catman2130093
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Nov 29 2007, 07:51 PM) *

I just pulled off a 600 miler in a single day. It was after visiting family over Thanksgiving and my wife and I were anxious to get home. She won't get behind the wheel, so I was solo the entire way. To make matters worse, it was a heavy traffic day and an 8-9 hour trip became a 13 hour ordeal. (Handling an RV of any size through heavy traffic in NY/NJ area was especially nice.)

It's been 4 days and I am still suffering from knotted muscles and fatigue. I have to say that 300-400 miles in a single sitting is about all I should do.

We boondocked at a Wal-Mart on the way down. This would have been very restful except for an electrical problem that delayed the trip by a couple of hours.

Being our 2nd trip, I think we did well. But I intend to follow Bud in Florida's advice and enjoy future trips. Mostly by not exhausting myself.

I too, follow the 2-300 mile per day regimen. I've done lots of 600 mile days in my car, and it takes me a day or two to recover from that-it's also no fun, and my 2 cats are miserable being cooped up in their crate that long. Even at 300 miles, I'll take a day off every other day or so.
lawdog
I am a solo part timer, and love every minute of it (if this counts). I camp to get away from work and anyone else I want to get away from.
DXSMac
QUOTE(lawdog @ Feb 26 2008, 02:34 AM) *

I am a solo part timer, and love every minute of it (if this counts). I camp to get away from work and anyone else I want to get away from.


Wow, that's a good way to go! I guess I "run away" in my RV, too! Trouble is, every time I'm in my RV, I don't ever want to go home!

JJ
Butch
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Feb 26 2008, 09:23 AM) *

Wow, that's a good way to go! I guess I "run away" in my RV, too! Trouble is, every time I'm in my RV, I don't ever want to go home!

JJ



Sounds like you are a candidate to become a full-timer !! Personally after a month, We are ready to go home for a few days....then do it all over again.
DXSMac
QUOTE(Butch @ Feb 26 2008, 12:29 PM) *

Sounds like you are a candidate to become a full-timer !! Personally after a month, We are ready to go home for a few days....then do it all over again.


I did "full-time" for about 8 months between when I sold my home in Eastern WA and moved to the Northwest corner of WA. I liked it, but being a substitute teacher (I'm retired, during my career, I was a Federal Auditor, no it wasn't the IRS.... now I just substitute teach just for fun....), I felt I needed to be kind of... 'rooted.' I'm going to sub until 2010, then I'm done and I will full-time again!

JJ
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