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Trentheim
My wife and I bought our first RV in the middle of the season last year and only were able to go out on a couple of trips-- one of which had us boondocking overnight in sub-freezing conditions (very late in the season).

But with only two real trips under our belt, we didn't really get a good feel for those awsome RV accessories that would make the experience even more enjoyable. So, I want to know, what items (or even handy tricks) do you use that you simply can't do without?

For that matter, what are some of the items that you thought were really cool when you saw them, but once you tried to use them weren't so cool after all?

So all you experienced RVers out there, lend a word or two of wisdom to us newbies. And help us find those nice toys we need while avoiding those we would only be wasting money on.
RetiredFA
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Mar 31 2008, 07:12 AM) *

My wife and I bought our first RV in the middle of the season last year and only were able to go out on a couple of trips-- one of which had us boondocking overnight in sub-freezing conditions (very late in the season).

But with only two real trips under our belt, we didn't really get a good feel for those awsome RV accessories that would make the experience even more enjoyable. So, I want to know, what items (or even handy tricks) do you use that you simply can't do without?

For that matter, what are some of the items that you thought were really cool when you saw them, but once you tried to use them weren't so cool after all?

So all you experienced RVers out there, lend a word or two of wisdom to us newbies. And help us find those nice toys we need while avoiding those we would only be wasting money on.


I bought a portable 12 volt air compressor. If you pull a toad, you can use this during your trip. You plug it in to your toad (car's) cigarette lighter, and you pump air into your tires. I don't pull a car, so I can only use this at the beginning of my trip, and hope for the best. MUST HAVE!

I recently bought a "power station" from Costco. It may solve my problem in the previous paragraph of putting air in my tires when I don't pull a car. WHen fully charged, it can serve as an air compressor, also be used to "jump" a dead battery, and it has outlets to power appliances up to 300 watts. I haven't really used this much, so haven't decided whether or not it's a "must have." Also, if you are boondocking, this appliance can't be used for space heaters, as they have 1500 watts.

If you like rice (or even spaghetti), Wal-Mart has a "microwave rice/pasta cooker." To me, this is "must have." It does a beautiful job with rice, as long as you follow the directions to the letter, to include the "setting" time after done cooking (for the rice). Also does great for Spaghetti!

Space heater is a "must have." If you are on shore power and it's cold, but not sub freezing, you can get by with the space heater in lieu of using your propane. You probably found out, one whole night of using propane in a furnace will ZAP your propane. If I'm plugged into 30 amps or more, I use an oil filled radiator in the bedroom, and a ceramic for the front section. I am also trying out the Presto Heat Dish, only uses 1300 watts. Haven't decided if I like it or not, you have to be careful about the "direct radiant" heat, as it can zap the moisture out of the air and your eyes will burn. I have a pet cat, I'm concerned that if my eyes burned, what about it's eyes?

If your knife valves for your tanks are "exposed" (mine are, they aren't in a basement or anything), get a 75 watt "trouble light" to place under them when it's cold.

Those are my "must haves." Of course, all of the above "must haves" assume you have shore power. I don't have any "must haves" for boondocking in freezing weather. On the other hand, I would like to know how you handled boondocking in freezing weather. I thought I was going to get the opportunity to try it a week ago, but then I ended up getting a 20 amp connection at the place I went to.

JJ
HappiestCamper
We've had our TT for 6 years now, and we've gone from loading it to the gills back to minimal - less stuff to worry about.

What we have kept - chairs for the outside (several of those nice ones that recline plus some others), several lightweight tables (a small one to use as an "end table" between the chairs and a larger one under the awning to prepare meals on), a 2 burner camping stove (higher flame than what is legally allowed inside the RV), and cast iron pots and pans to cook in the campfire (our TT only has a stove top - no oven).

Last but not least - Matchlight charcoal. The cast iron cooks well on the coals, plus it's great for starting campfires.

And of course some nice cold adult beverages in the fridge.
RLM
Trentheim> I suppose "must have" depends on the type RVing one does - from tent campers to luxury motor home. Since I try to do away from civilization campgrounds where TV reception is minimal, one of my comfort level must haves is my satellite system. My wife's would be the convection/microwave or sewing machine.

You would be wasting your money on the leggo type plastic leveling blocks that mount under tires. Non-rechargeable batteries is another. I would not buy any of the ďAs seen on TVĒ stuff.

Some of the things that I have found useful:

1- Portable pressure washer with adjustable pressure. Takes the labor out of washing the rig.
2- Folding step stools (the single step kind)
3- Heated blanket for cold weather
4- Oscillating fan. Distributes AC air in the rig and keeps bugs way when placed on the picnic table.
5- 15 minute increment electric timers. Works well with inside security lights and on ceramic heaters during the night.
6- FRS two way radios. A real must for communicating with someone helping you park the rig. Good to have when you and the wife want to part ways at the shopping mall.
7- Adjustable leg portable tables. Great for inside or out. We actually replaced our freestanding RV table with a larger one of these that seats four. Itís folded up when not in use so we get a huge amount of extra space in the dining area.

Some would have a different opinion, but I have found that my inverter is a much more must have than my generator. First, I usually only boon dock for an overnighter and it will power everything but the AC. Since I have a motor home, itís very handy when Iím on the move to power the computer, charge small batteries, or for other a/c power needs. Either way, it is quieter than the generator and best of all uses no fuel.

I agree with HappiestCamper about the beverages. But we prefer wine. Wonder if I should build a wine cellar into the rig? smile.gif
gwbischoff
Gasoline.

No matter how hard I try, I just simply can't go on any trip without buying some.
csvreno
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Mar 31 2008, 07:12 AM) *

My wife and I bought our first RV in the middle of the season last year and only were able to go out on a couple of trips-- one of which had us boondocking overnight in sub-freezing conditions (very late in the season).

But with only two real trips under our belt, we didn't really get a good feel for those awsome RV accessories that would make the experience even more enjoyable. So, I want to know, what items (or even handy tricks) do you use that you simply can't do without?

For that matter, what are some of the items that you thought were really cool when you saw them, but once you tried to use them weren't so cool after all?

So all you experienced RVers out there, lend a word or two of wisdom to us newbies. And help us find those nice toys we need while avoiding those we would only be wasting money on.

We've been out in our motorhome down into the mid-teens. One must-have for us are a pair of Dri-Z-Aires or equivalent. We made the mistake of closing up our old travel trailer too tight once; in the morning it was almost raining inside. Another must have, in my opinion, is a good headlamp. I use one at work and have used it numerous times when I needed my hands free around the campsite. Fairly cheap, but useful.
FosterImposters
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Apr 7 2008, 02:04 PM) *

Gasoline....


AMEN and amen !!! blink.gif
At this juncture (fuel pricing) seriously rethinking our trek to Alaska this year. Sure, once we get out of California the price drops 20, 30 cents... but good grief!!!
The major oil companies are sucking us all dry!
FosterImposters
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Mar 31 2008, 07:12 AM) *

So all you experienced RVers out there, lend a word or two of wisdom to us newbies. And help us find those nice toys we need while avoiding those we would only be wasting money on.


Ok Trentheim...taking your request seriously to heart. rolleyes.gif
1. Take your time deciding whether or not you need campground memberships. Do some basic research on the up-front costs / annual fees for what you ACTUALLY get for your money.
2. Shadow or join a couple forums. This one is good. www.IRV2.com is also friendly and a tad more folks in the pool. Slightly different mix at www.campercommunity.com
3. Don't be afraid to ask folks: either on-line, or while out 'n about camping. "Say, how do you like your....? Been trying do decide if we should get one..."

Above all, relax. This is YOUR RVing experience... wink.gif
Cheers!
ddbradley952
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Mar 31 2008, 09:12 AM) *

My wife and I bought our first RV in the middle of the season last year and only were able to go out on a couple of trips-- one of which had us boondocking overnight in sub-freezing conditions (very late in the season).

But with only two real trips under our belt, we didn't really get a good feel for those awsome RV accessories that would make the experience even more enjoyable. So, I want to know, what items (or even handy tricks) do you use that you simply can't do without?

For that matter, what are some of the items that you thought were really cool when you saw them, but once you tried to use them weren't so cool after all?

So all you experienced RVers out there, lend a word or two of wisdom to us newbies. And help us find those nice toys we need while avoiding those we would only be wasting money on.


Accessories (Junk from China) we really don't need to own:

Cup Holder; Just use your hand to hold the darn cup!
Salad Shooter; Why do you need to shoot salad?
Night lights; Just go to bed!
New Winnebago seat belt; as seen in this picture.
mikel
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Mar 31 2008, 06:12 AM) *

My wife and I bought our first RV in the middle of the season last year and only were able to go out on a couple of trips-- one of which had us boondocking overnight in sub-freezing conditions (very late in the season).

But with only two real trips under our belt, we didn't really get a good feel for those awsome RV accessories that would make the experience even more enjoyable. So, I want to know, what items (or even handy tricks) do you use that you simply can't do without?

For that matter, what are some of the items that you thought were really cool when you saw them, but once you tried to use them weren't so cool after all?

So all you experienced RVers out there, lend a word or two of wisdom to us newbies. And help us find those nice toys we need while avoiding those we would only be wasting money on.


Wireless Laptop, you can make reservations ahead of time, one click away, plus anything off the web you need.

GPS has made it nice when you have no idea where you are.

we have satellite radio,which is nice under the awning.

LCD/Plasma TVs, still need to be strapped down or mounted and strapped.

Ice, Fan, folding step stool, cordless vaccum, TOOLBOX, amprobe,.

we've had a bumper pull travel trailer and 2 different 5th wheels one thing that is nice is those mirrors the are mounted or removable to back into the hitch.

http://www.lacrawfish.com/ this website will send crawfish, live, fresh, overnight delivery to basically anywher in the USA, lower 48. We planned ahead for spring break, on the 2nd or 3rd day of our stay our crawfish arrived at the park office, before 12"00 p.m. by 7:00 pm they were boiled and gone.

the reason I mention the crawfish website is there are other websites that provide deliveries, so plan ahead, you don't always have to pack everything.

EBAY.

mk
Jurhee
QUOTE(gwbischoff @ Apr 7 2008, 04:04 PM) *

Gasoline.

No matter how hard I try, I just simply can't go on any trip without buying some.



An easier reply that covers everything--------MONEY!! Then you are covered for gasoline, diesel, and other essentials like "adult beverages" rolleyes.gif

http://www.jerry-jurhee.blogspot.com/
rangiebob
Some great ideas on this thread. Besides some you-all have mentioned, our best purchase was a down comforter for those chilly nights in an un-insulated bedroom.

Our biggest waste of money was getting the on-board vacuum system. It was such a pain to use so after the first month, we got our Oreck out of storage and never used the vacuum again.
Jurhee
QUOTE(rangiebob @ Jun 21 2008, 05:49 PM) *

Some great ideas on this thread. Besides some you-all have mentioned, our best purchase was a down comforter for those chilly nights in an un-insulated bedroom.

Our biggest waste of money was getting the on-board vacuum system. It was such a pain to use so after the first month, we got our Oreck out of storage and never used the vacuum again.



I agree on the down comforter. We have one in the coach and a couple at home. We use them year round---at home, a lighter weight one in the summer and a heavy one in the winter.

The Oreck is a great little vacuum. I had one for my previous coaches---small, light weight, easy to store, and does a great job. In the current coach, I only have carpet in the bedroom and did not want to carry the Oreck. I have a new, heavy duty Dust-Buster. I use it lots more than I ever did a vacuum. Just bend over and go! It is amazing how much it picks up! Does as good as the Oreck.

If you have all carpet, the Dust-Buster is great for touch-ups between regular vacuuming.

Jurhee

http://www.jerry-jurhee.blogspot.com/

Trentheim
I have to agree with rangiebob that there are and have been some great ideas on this thread. Now I want to ask, what items might one be needing when taking the RV to a beach area?
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(Trentheim @ Jun 24 2008, 02:13 PM) *

I have to agree with rangiebob that there are and have been some great ideas on this thread. Now I want to ask, what items might one be needing when taking the RV to a beach area?


First item is not what you take, but what is there. Since the beaches around here are about 100 degrees, you want shore power so you can run the A/C.

Now, what I must have at a beach CG:

1. Awning tie downs - since it's going to be so hot, I really want to have my awning out and not worry about it when that afternoon thunderstorm with the high winds comes through.
2. Indoor cookware - most of my camping is in the mountains, and I do most of my cooking outside. Since it's going to be so hot at the beach, I'd rather cook in the A/C.
3. Outdoor shower for everybody after they have been on the beach - if you don't have an outdoor shower, get a Y connector for your water and hose everybody off before they go inside.
4. Sunscreens and hats - the dermatologist is constantly cutting on me - that's what happens when you grew up on a beach in the 60's with red hair.
5. Salt water tackle.
6. A way to make a decent pot of coffee (that goes for any CG).
7. Cold adult beverages (see number 6).
RetiredFA
QUOTE(Jurhee @ Jun 21 2008, 04:05 PM) *

I agree on the down comforter. We have one in the coach and a couple at home. We use them year round---at home, a lighter weight one in the summer and a heavy one in the winter.

http://www.jerry-jurhee.blogspot.com/


If you don't want to spend the bucks on a down comforter, a Mexican wool blanket also does the trick. My bed has only sheets and a comforter, when it's sub freezing, I add the Mexican wool blanket and I stay toasty even when my space heater is going full blast trying to maintain 65 and I'm supplementing with propane furnace trying to maintain 55.......

[READ THIS SECTION ONLY IF YOU ARE ONE WHO CLAMORS FOR PERSONAL TIDBITS: My Mexican blanket was a gift 25 years ago from a boyfriend I had at the time who took a business trip to Mexico...... Well, normally when a relationship breaks off for whatever reason, I have a "burn party." Everything goes! Good for the soul! I kept this Mexican blanket, don't know why..... perhaps because it was "functional." Well, it has come handy in the RV! END OF PERSONAL TIDBIT SECTION]

JJ
FosterImposters
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Jun 24 2008, 02:52 PM) *

...[READ THIS SECTION ONLY IF YOU ARE ONE WHO CLAMORS FOR PERSONAL TIDBITS: ...


You crack me up ! laugh.gif
Jurhee
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Jun 24 2008, 04:52 PM) *

If you don't want to spend the bucks on a down comforter, a Mexican wool blanket also does the trick. My bed has only sheets and a comforter, when it's sub freezing, I add the Mexican wool blanket and I stay toasty even when my space heater is going full blast trying to maintain 65 and I'm supplementing with propane furnace trying to maintain 55.......
JJ



Yeah, but the comforter's are so cuddly. I used to like a velour blanket, but, I had never had a down comforter. DH had them when I met him, and now I just love them.
bj41
If you are going to the beach, I would suggest ant spray. We go to Florida in the winter and Myrtle Beach on the way home and both places we have had a problem with ants. Now, my hubby sprays around the tires, sewer hoses and water hoses once a week. We buy a spray at Walmart , not too expensive and it has taken care of the problem.
rangiebob
The reason I love the down comforter is because it's so lightweight. When I first get into bed and I'm freezing, it doesn't seem possible that it will keep me warm. After a few minutes, I'm warm and cozy. Those things are amazing!
Jurhee
QUOTE(rangiebob @ Jun 25 2008, 06:02 PM) *

The reason I love the down comforter is because it's so lightweight. When I first get into bed and I'm freezing, it doesn't seem possible that it will keep me warm. After a few minutes, I'm warm and cozy. Those things are amazing!



I agree. I slept under electric blankets nearly all my life. Without it, I could pile on blankets until I could hardly move and still be cold. With the down comforter, it is so warm. Within a few minutes, it is like I am under an electric blanket. You can get out from under it, and climb back in bed a few minutes later, and it is still toasty warm. Love 'em biggrin.gif


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