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RLM
It's getting too expensive to travel the country on my dime. So we have decided that we'd like someone else to contribute to that expense. With that in mind, does anyone have any suggestions on seasonal or part time work camper jobs?

I am familar with the workcamper website, but I'm not interested in paying to compete with a zillion others looking for one or two camp hosts jobs that require cleaning toilets for a free campsite. We are not beneath that task, but an employer would certainly be wasting the combined talents of my wife and I were that the main job requirement.

Somewhere out there is a seasonal job that messes with our skills and a prospective employer.

Where do I look for it?
DXSMac
This may be a little off the wall and "out of the box" for you, but what about substitute teaching? Some states (not all, but some do...) have a category called "Emergency" substitute. Basically, the requirement is you have a college degree (some states let you sub on a high school degree....)

I've been subbing for six years. First four three, I was doing it while working at my full time job because I had a schedule where I worked 9 hour days and had every other Friday off. I subbed on those Fridays. Then, I retired and full-timed for awhile, and continued subbing for the same school. Two years ago, I moved to my present location, and sub over here.

I live in WA, and the requirements in WA are a college degree and a background check to make sure you aren't a "creepo." Also, the "rules" are that the school can't ask you to sub unless they have no "certificated" subs available.

Ok, if that's not your bag, another suggestion is... if you are good with numbers, take the H&R Block tax course, and then you can do taxes Jan - Apr. While I was full-timing, I did do a stint at H&R Block. I didn't stay long, because I just didn't like it there (even though I LOVE doing taxes...). But that might be an option.

Once you have the H&R Block training, you can just bop around and when tax season comes around, you just pick a place and work for H&R Block (Jackson Hewitt does the same thing.... don't know much about them...)

JJ
Texasrvers
My inlaws worked in national parks each summer (actually Apr-Oct.) for about 4-5 years. They worked at Yellowstone, Mesa Verde, Grand Canyon, and Shenandoah Valley, and loved every one. They only stopped because of health reasons. They usually worked in gift shops although one year my father-in-law was a short order cook. But that was his choice; he didn't have to do that. They never had to do any undesirable jobs. I remember the application asked if they would be willing to do room cleaning (and some other yucky stuff). They always checked No, and were still always hired. I seem to remember there was a big variety of jobs-- things like librarian, bookkeeper, grounds keeper, and bus driver. They said that one reason they always got hired was because they were willing to start in Apr and stay until Oct. I think there is even a salary bonus for that. Many applicants only want to work the 2-3 summer months. Also I'm pretty sure that if they stayed in a national park campground, their space was free. Unfortunately I think the sign up period is in Jan-Feb so it may be too late to get hired this year, but I don't know for sure. Back then (late 1990's) they applied through the Aramark Corporation--the concessionaire that runs many of the shops and restaurants, etc., in the national parks. I don't know if that is how you apply now or not. If you're interested you could probably contact one of the national parks and ask about their application process.

Also when we retired we bought several books about "second careers." These listed many ideas for part time jobs based on your interests, skills, and training. I'm sure there are many titles available at bookstores. If you didn't want to spend money for books, try your local library.

Hope this gives you some ideas, and good luck.
bumsky2
As a manager at a resort that does use "workcampers" my suggestion would be to directly contact the places you might want to stay at and ask if they use hosts. We have found some of our best staff came here as guests before joining our team. Also, from the employer perspective, have some type resume or work history ready to submit. I hope this helps extend your travel dollars. Safe Travels, Sheryl smile.gif
Lee and Fran
This should help you. I like volunteering at the parks the best. That way I can see the park, usually see things in the park not open to the public, they provide free full hookup campsite, and I can see other things in the general area.

http://www.volunteer.gov/gov/
http://bill.laudeman.com/vols/index.html
http://www.coolworks.com/
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/spdest/park_host/
http://www.fws.gov/volunteers/
http://www.orn.usace.army.mil/volunteer/joblistings.html
http://www.rvparkstore.com/rv_park_help_wanted.htm
RLM
QUOTE(bumsky2 @ Jun 8 2008, 10:02 AM) *

.... Also, from the employer perspective, have some type resume or work history ready to submit. I hope this helps extend your travel dollars. Safe Travels, Sheryl smile.gif


The resume is an issue with me. I find that I'm having to dumb mine down. Having an MBA, the ability to pilot jet aircraft, supervised hundreds of people, and a host of other skills don't fit with cleaning bathrooms and picking up trash. I suspect that if you got one like mine used to be, you'd think "over-qualified" and put it in the circular file.

It doesn't matter that I am success oriented, have an exceptional work ethic, would treat an employer's business as if it were mine, and really don't mind getting my hands dirty, I am starting out without prior camp host experience.

So what are you looking for on a resume?
dancyn
You don't need to dumb down your resume. As an employer, I want to see what you did in your previous jobs. I also want to see what organizations and clubs you belonged to. I can teach just about anyone to do the work in the park, but I have to be able to ascertain your ability to work with people. Your personality will be your biggest selling point.

I want employees who are pleasant, patient, relaxed, and cheerful, and who at the same time are efficient, competent, and trustworthy. Your resume needs to show these attributes.

Remember, the majority of us working in campgrounds and resorts are retired from stressful occupations and are doing this because we want to and because we love this lifestyle. Employers know the applications they will be receiving are from people who have had successful careers but now want to enjoy a different pace in their life.

A people person will get the job everytime, no matter what they did in their previous careers. Good luck, and let your personality shine through.
FosterImposters
Very interesting...thank you.
Quite the opposite from previous resume, interview and professional presentation training drilled into all successful candidates in the corporate world. ohmy.gif
Like RLM...we have resumes that drill home fiscal successes: How quickly can you achieve quarterly sales, operations targets. How quickly can you stop corporate bleeding.
Personality ? Ha! The more rabid the better. wink.gif
Good to learn the kinder, gentler sides of personalities can be exhibited w/o penalty.
cool.gif
Lee and Fran
A lot of these places just want to know if you are smart enough to follow directions without someone holding your hand. And also most could care less about a resume. I have worked three parks and have yet to be asked about my background. I have two college degrees and also have owned two of my own businesses. That and a dollar will buy me a cup of coffee.
RLM
Lee> Coffee was a buck and a quarter at the resturant yesterday. Notwithstanding the refills, gas is cheaper.

Dancyn> People skills? I guess I'll never get a job. I'm an ex-mililtary pilot trained to kill hordes of people with the flip of a toggle switch. dry.gif See I do have a sense of humor.

It's ironic that you mention people skills from an employer's viewpoint. Since making this post, I had one offer which I turned down. That employer didn't appear to have any. The interview is a two way street.

Good suggestions tho. I'll re-look the resume based on them. Thank you.
Texasrvers
RLM,

Maybe the employer who offered you a job was looking to hire someone with the people skills that he didn't have--to fill the void, so to speak. Course I don't know what it would be like to work for someone like that. Just a thought.
FosterImposters
QUOTE(Texasrvers @ Jun 16 2008, 10:33 AM) *

... Course I don't know what it would be like to work for someone like that....


Ah yes...that would be when the flipping of toggle switches would come in handy...

Sorry...couldn't help myself.
laugh.gif
Parkview
QUOTE(dancyn @ Jun 12 2008, 01:38 AM) *

You don't need to dumb down your resume. As an employer, I want to see what you did in your previous jobs. I also want to see what organizations and clubs you belonged to. I can teach just about anyone to do the work in the park, but I have to be able to ascertain your ability to work with people. Your personality will be your biggest selling point.

I want employees who are pleasant, patient, relaxed, and cheerful, and who at the same time are efficient, competent, and trustworthy. Your resume needs to show these attributes.

Remember, the majority of us working in campgrounds and resorts are retired from stressful occupations and are doing this because we want to and because we love this lifestyle. Employers know the applications they will be receiving are from people who have had successful careers but now want to enjoy a different pace in their life.

A people person will get the job everytime, no matter what they did in their previous careers. Good luck, and let your personality shine through.



I agree totally with dancyn. We need people who will help us retain customers. Sourpusses need not apply. Also, expect to be flexible; you may have a certain set of skills that we count on 90% of the time, but in an emergency its all hands on deck, whether it be operating a plunger, sprinkling ant dust or wasp spray if a camper complains, diagnosing cable TV or wi-fi problems, or traffic control during heavy check-in periods.
dancyn
RLM...an interview is definitely a two-way street. You are interviewing the potential employer at the same time he/she is interviewing you. If you have any qualms about the employer, pull the trigger! Life's too precious to waste time with someone like that.

RLM
We've got a bingo here, folks. I was offered a job which I accepted. Interviewer and I connected right from the start. Altho it involves that, it's not the typical camp host job and not in a common tourist area so am really looking forward to the "adventure."

Parkview> You just gave me an idea to add to the resume for future use. I'm the type who has the intangible skill of knowing when to be on deck before it becomes an emergency. And BTW, I'll try to remember to ping you as you get near your departure date for the western trip. You may travel near where I'll be.

Foster> I think I need to safety the toggle switches when you're near them. biggrin.gif
Texasrvers
Congratulations RLM. But it sounds like you won't be in Texas anymore. Our loss. Hope it isn't permanent, and we'll see you back here in the off season.
FosterImposters
Congratulations RLM! This is totally cool. What part of the country will this adventure begin? When do you all start? Please keep in touch once you settle in!
Cheers!
cool.gif
mastercraft
RLM, keep us posted on the work camping experience. In the years to come, my wife and I might be interested in doing what you are doing. Of course with the cost of living these days, especially fuel, so will everyone else with an RV cool.gif
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