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pianotuna
Hi Lindsay,

Well with that big pole you use...clearly you HOG everyone's bandwidth. And what's worse you do it ON PURPOSE!!!
HappiestCamper
We're getting out of proportion here. You are expected to use the water in a reasonable manner - you wouldn't wash your camper or vehicles unless they say you can. I would assume that shared Wi-Fi shouldn't be eaten up with an online backup.

But in both instances, if the CG doesn't stop you from doing it, some will do it anyway.
Lindsay Richards
I
QUOTE
would assume that shared Wi-Fi shouldn't be eaten up with an online backup.


When we are gone for 3 months at time, it is really necessary in my opinion. When I got my first computer, I had a micro cassette for a hard drive and have been seeing computer usage change drastically over the decades. Computers come now with 4 gig ram standard and 250 or more gig hard drives. I think if campers are going to be upgrading and keeping up with the technology, people offering WiFi service should be keeping up with technology also. If you are going to offer WiFi, I think your system has to be large enough to handle what is routinely done by the computing public. I have stayed at many places that advertised WiFi and had such crappy service as to be unusable. The question becomes is it because the camper who is paying for the service one way or the other is being a hog or is it because the park's system is incapable of handling today's average needs. We use the computer to communicate with our friends and relatives and photos really tell a great story. I have my digital camera set at highest resolution for my hard drive and then resize down to website level and lose about 90% of the file size. My uploading to the net is very quick, but my online backup takes about 10 times longer. I try to do it at night so as not to affect others. We boondock a lot and when we stay at a campground and pay for WiFi, I unpause my Carbonite and back up. We are staying 2 days at a campground outside of Theo Roosevelt National Park. We payed $58 total for the two nights and I uploaded about half a gig of photos. I think it was a good deal for everybody. I also think that once 4 Gig phone networks are commonplace, WiFi will go the way of the dial telephone.
joez
QUOTE
I am convinced that campground owners are getting the message that WiFi is a real desired amenity.


While true, this may be causing issues for campgrounds that many of us do not consider. What liabilities does offering WiFi expose the campground to? There is some interesting reading here
ARVC study on WiFi liabilities

Obviously this information is a long way from being definitive, but it does show how complex a seemingly simple thing can become in today's world. The law of unintended consequences, I guess.
katsuey
Wifi is important to me since I'm a web designer. However, I do run with a backup - I can tether my Blackberry to my laptop and run that way, though it's slower than the cable I'm use to.

I think if a Campground lists an amenity - it should be free or clearly note that it is not. I would not pay for Wifi. We've also noted that many campgrounds are offering cable TV. We haven't guppied up yet for a DISH so we appreciate that.

As newbies to RVing, we are rather amazed at the prices of campgrounds. We just did a 28 day trip and the average campground price was right about $35 even with a Good Sam's discount. I thought times were hard and less people were traveling so we might catch a break after $4 gal gas - not so.
Lindsay Richards
We are leaving a private campground today at Yellowstone. They use Tenngo commercial system. You get two passwords per day that entitle you to 2 hours each, but have to be separated by 10 hours each. Very weird system. Speed varies from very slow to moderately fast. I basically used my Android tether and did backups for 2 hours when we left in morning and when I went to bed at night. Access shut down after two hours and I set up my "sleep" feature to correspond. Very screwy system. If somebody wants to just do email and very low bandwidth applications, they should do it via cell phone. Once again, I am hoping WiFi soon becomes a thing of the past with fast cell phone speeds around the corner. (I hope.).

My thoughts and prayers go to the many folks involved in the floods. Here in the Rockies, the remaining snow pack is huge and locals are saying the highest in 50 years for this time of year. This is going to be melting and much of it will be going down to the Mississippi. It is going to be months before this is all over.
AFChap

QUOTE
the average campground price was right about $35 even with a Good Sam's discount
You must be staying at places with "resort" or "KOA" in their names. We are fulltimers. It is extremely rare for us to pay over $30 per night, much less $35.

QUOTE
They use Tenngo
I have learned to pass on campground WIFI if it is provided by TengoNet ...I have used it in many places and I don't believe it EVER works well. Using my tethered cell phone is cheaper, and ALWAYS works better...
Lindsay Richards
QUOTE
I have learned to pass on campground WIFI if it is provided by TengoNet ...I have used it in many places and I don't believe it EVER works well. Using my tethered cell phone is cheaper, and ALWAYS works better...


Exactly what I did, but used my free Tenngo for backups 2 hours in morning and 2 hours in evening.
Jack Mayer
I design and install wifi systems exclusively for small RV parks.

Most parks of this type do not have backhaul (the connection from the park to the Internet) that is very fast. Thus when overloaded everyone suffers. Most of the parks I set up I restrict access to streaming sites for movies and TV. Monitoring the networks you would be surprised how many people want to watch TV all day on their computers, or movies. One or two like that is the reason most networks are slow.

Many people are used to high speed fiber or cable based residential systems. And they expect that the wifi in parks will be equivalent. Education by the park is the key....most people are understanding if they are educated. Althought there are those that feel they are "entitled" to "all they can eat". So, my advice is to try to be considerate of your fellow RVers and not consume lots of bandwidth if you know it is not available.
JDRobar
It is my impression that most people that RV try to be considerate. Yes, to be sure, there are exceptions.

But, I suspect that some folks just aren't aware that streaming video requires a lot of resources.

By asking folks to not hog resources, I believe the assumption is that they know better. In some way this begs the usage charge; and, while I think that is unfortunate as it is a nuisance, it is the way the accidental/intentional hog gets their notice. You pay for what you take if it is inordinate. ohmy.gif

Perhaps if the usage was free up to a certain limit, then a charge was placed, say for every (rounded) half-Gig used.

IMHO, until people are made to be responsible for their actions, they will (unwittingly or not) act accordingly.


WHOA! What happened - I'm no longer a newbie ?
Galli
QUOTE(JDRobar @ Jun 16 2011, 07:23 PM) *

It is my impression that most people that RV try to be considerate. Yes, to be sure, there are exceptions.

But, I suspect that some folks just aren't aware that streaming video requires a lot of resources.

By asking folks to not hog resources, I believe the assumption is that they know better. In some way this begs the usage charge; and, while I think that is unfortunate as it is a nuisance, it is the way the accidental/intentional hog gets their notice. You pay for what you take if it is inordinate. ohmy.gif

Perhaps if the usage was free up to a certain limit, then a charge was placed, say for every (rounded) half-Gig used.

IMHO, until people are made to be responsible for their actions, they will (unwittingly or not) act accordingly.
WHOA! What happened - I'm no longer a newbie ?

Wow, you spoke like a written book he, he, he.
I agree with you 100% and I am of the opinion that to make people aware is by chargin them
boogie
QUOTE(drmcleod @ Jul 18 2008, 06:18 PM) *

Should Campgrounds charge for Internet access?

What do you think?


A limited yes :-) basic wifi is not expensive and is easy to maintain if you know how. The problem is in and around cities if you dont hire a company to manage a wifi hotspot to control it ANYONE can get on. Yes, I have seen ppl sit in cars outside businesses to use it. Thats often when your money paying customers complain about speed, you begin getting neg. reviews. Then there are campers with kids of multiple ages that each want on to download music, for kindles, ipads, and computers and don't even get me started on netflix and gaming systems LOL. I feel free basic internet access to do searching, email, socializing is perfect. In that same note there should be rules preventing the system from being overloaded by those wanting to play high end games and music/video downloads...wifi isnt meant for that...and with the parks I am experienced with most wifis are bogged down with a few ppl at the sacrifice of many.
Tireman9
Just returned from a week trip that included 6 different campgrounds.
Never a separate charge but WiFi ranged from good to non-existant at my campsite. A couple parks offered WiFi but you had to go to the office building area.
In one case I was about 100' from office so my Hawking signal booster worked.
The CG I liked the best only had WiFi at the rec hall but they were only charging $28 (30A electric)

Side issues. How about parks that have coin operated showers? or consider 15A electric reasonable.

Would I like "free" WiFi? Sure. I would also like a clean, heated pool, dry capsites, free showers and maybe a golf cart to ride around in but I'm not holding my breath.

Maybe the solution would be to offer WiFi but keep the charge nominal like $2. That way the park owner knows who and how many really wants it, and if they need to grow capacity,
zavsgran
As an RV Park owner, I do not feel that it is fair to charge for this service. I paid $600 for an antenna & $29.95/month for 20MBPS Internet service. This also keeps me free from liability when someone how up with an older computer, they don't get as angry when they are not paying for wifi
Lindsay Richards
We just returned from a 2 month plus trip saying in numerous parks and boondocking. The WiFi was spotty and one time I questioned the owner about it and feel like he definitely lied about it. I have a really good omnidirectional WiFi antenna and was unable to pick it up. Another place that said they had WiFi told us when we couldn't get it at our site that, "It's working good at the house." I think many owners realize that WiFi is a big selling point and make an uninformed attempt to provide it. Both guys I mentioned touted it heavily. One just plain lied about it and the other was just dumb. I was able to hellp things drastically with my antenna. I also have the ability to tether so my Verizon Android. In the West we had times where we could get no cell signal. I have recently heard of a new WiFi type system that utilized the wave length between different TV channels that is supposed to be very good. It is called White WiFi. Looks like the much touted WiMax has died. We take an extended trip every summer and this trip was the best of all for getting internet coverage and I think that trend will be continuing.
CyndiK
QUOTE(tandiee @ Jul 22 2008, 10:03 AM) *

I think WiFi should be free, almost all the Motels offer it and most are free.
.

I don't do much on the internet while camping but the weather bulletins are worth it. Last time the campground did nothing to warn anyone of storms. Good thing someone had access to let people prepare.
Lindsay Richards
QUOTE
I have seen ppl sit in cars outside businesses to use it.



Hey, that was me. next time stop and say HI. Putting in a password will stop 99 plus% of us who use unprotected WiFi.
Galli
QUOTE(drmcleod @ Jul 18 2008, 04:18 PM) *

Should Campgrounds charge for Internet access?

I would like to get other opinions on this.

My opinion is no! I have two reasons for this.

First, as a consumer. Having free internet access is actually one of the things I look for in a campground. It's a 'perk' if you will. If I have the choice between two, somewhat comparable, c/g's then I will choose the one with free WiFi. Heck, I'll even choose the one with free WiFi over one that is slightly nicer with fee for service.

Second, as a business owner (of which I am one). It does not cost more to allow the whole campground access to your broadband service. The only additional expense is the addition of the hardware. In some cases this might be more expensive if additional antennas are required and installation requires an expert. Also, a higher than basic internet subscription is needed. However, if the c/g is going to charge for its WiFi service, then all of this has to be done anyway. Therefore, consider it a marketing expense to drive more people to your c/g. Why do you think that places like Panera Bread and even McDonald's are offering free WiFi? I know I choose to eat there when I need a place to surf while I eat. In my case, I want more people to come to my place of business, so I make my wireless service available to all. It costs me no more, but brings more people to me.

What do you think?

Should Campgrounds charge for Internet access?

I would like to get other opinions on this. = Yes, Internet is not part of the facilities required for camping, the organization is charging you, as unit price for space, for electrical line up to your unit , water shower and washroom service, every thing else, unless specifically included should be optional service and must be paid for.
rkw99
I think it's fine if they charge. If they charge though, I expect it to work consistently. We can take it or leave it. We bring the laptop and if wi-fi is available we will use it even if we have to pay. The only place we've been charged, we paid about $15 for a week. It would have been about $10 for a day though and I wouldn't pay that much.
I don't mind if the campground doesn't have it at all although now that most do, I am starting to expect it. If they don't have it, it's an excuse to find a Starbucks and get away from the kids for an hour smile.gif
Gerall
Given a choice between no wifi and wifi, I always stay where there is wifi. Free is bonus, nominal fee is OK as I understand the costs involved in provisioning.
I am parked at an RV park now since early July and will stay until later in Sept. I have Skype running on my laptop with a Philips VOIP wireless phone system attached to the PC.
This is my main telephone system, and is cost effective as I subscribe to annual unlimited North America free calls. It is just like at home. Unfortunately the RV park I am in is in a rural setting and served via wireless internet provider. While the speed browsing is great the jitter sometimes causes difficulty in phone conversations where low jitter rates are required.

RFCN2
Gerall - Skype is a demanding internet user. I have used Skype for years in my office and on my cell phone to make overseas calls. It is not a good choice for anything but fast high speed internet. I had issues with Skype today in my office and I have a very fast connection that is land based.
tbayhiker
On the topic of 3G/4G vs wifi...I use my data plan when traveling throughout my home country but once I cross the border I must turn off my data as it would cost a fortune. Wifi is the only way we can remain connected to friends and pay bills. I would be happy to use my own data plan and not have to rely on cg wifi connections but it is not practical yet. I don't mind paying a small fee for wifi but at $5 - $10/day it really adds up over a 2-3month period.
Kawartha
As indicated the quality of wifi in campgrounds varies considerably. I talked to one WIFI provider who was putting broadcast WIFI into a park on Lake Ontario. He admitted that the speed was initially SLOW and the more people that were on it at a time, the slower the access became. He said that aside from checking emails and making short replies, its effectiveness was limited.
Windjammer
We are in week 6 of a cross country run. We work from our camper, and need wifi. Only one campground has offered decent bandwidth. They also have an upgrade for pay feature that allows video conferencing and streaming. Very satisfactory. The others were so throttled down, it took minutes to load the Google home page. Tengo is a provider that does this, and I avoid parks that use this "service". Why even offer it? A good system is very costly, and I expect to lay for it in the price of the site, when I need it. WiFi is a key feature driving my decision on park choice.
dodge guy
Do hotels charge for Wi-Fi?
joez
QUOTE(dodge guy @ Oct 26 2011, 12:50 PM) *

Do hotels charge for Wi-Fi?


DW travels (air/hotel) 80% of each work week, mostly lower 48, some international. She says many hotels charge for internet access. The fee is normally waived for frequent stayers. She normally uses mifi/aircard but if she cannot get adequate service she has to use the hotel's. She prefers the paid access as, she says, it normally works better and is more reliable than the free stuff.
Suzi4
smile.gif For most trips Internet service is very important to me and I will choose campgrounds based on it. If at all possible I will stay away from campgrounds that limit you to 30 minutes or charge a huge fee for it. A wouldn't mind a small fee for a good internet connection but the ones that charge tend to charge a large fee for bad service. In this day and time it is an important extra to keep business.
Lindsay Richards
Getting a good WiFi antenna will expand your horizons (pun intended).
Don-in-GA
As an RV Park owner, I do not charge for daily and weekly customers. Those rates are higher then seasonal/monthly rates and are sufficient to cover my cost. We do charge $20 per month for the seasonal/monthly campers. WIFI is a must for any park owners reading these post. I am also a RV owner, we traveled from GA to Yellowstone a year ago and not one time did we find a decent WIFI. Either the signal strength or bandwidth was terrible. Of course they are related. Many owners just don't have access to a good high speed provider, others just put a router in the office and will not spend the money required for a good system. I have spent thousands upgrading equipment but it is money well spent. One of the first questions of a new customer is do I have WIFI. Without any doubt, it brings business. In regards to bandwidth hogs, netflix, etc. Valuepoint Networks makes a very good controller that many hotels use to manage guest. This controls the login and passwords and keeps the rest of town off your system. That alone will give more bandwidth to your customers. Bandwidth controls per user is easily adjusted. I give everyone full speed until I see repeated extreme bandwidth used, then I step by step adjust downward. The average user may consume 100 megs or less per day. I just logged in my controller and have two users that have used over 2 gigs each today! Luckily I have two Internet Providers and great equipment that combines them for extreme bandwidth. Being and RV owner and Park owner, I understand the frustrations from both sides.
joez
QUOTE
I give everyone full speed until I see repeated extreme bandwidth used, then I step by step adjust downward. The average user may consume 100 megs or less per day. I just logged in my controller and have two users that have used over 2 gigs each today!


I support your right to limit bandwidth use. Do you tell customer's at check in what the limits are? Do you warn them before beginning to limit their access?
browne07
One thing more to consider with respect to Wi fi or cable is how fast is it? I have been to parks that advertise it as part of the package and it is so bad it is not worth even having. Kind of like advertising cable and having 15 channels.
Don-in-GA
QUOTE(joez @ Nov 14 2011, 09:26 AM) *

I support your right to limit bandwidth use. Do you tell customer's at check in what the limits are? Do you warn them before beginning to limit their access?


Yes we do but most folks have no idea how much bandwidth steaming media such as Netflix uses because they have no way to measure. We dont limit access, we just throttle there speed down so plenty of bandwidth is left for the other customers. Generally 1 person out of 10 uses 90% of the bandwidth. On my wifi system at full speed a user can download 20 megs per minute. Thats a gig in under an hour.
Mojavian
As an RV owner and new reviewer here, I appreciate other reviewers providing information about the wifi service performance in their reviews. A lot of campgrounds advertise wifi, but when you try to use it, you either cannot get a lease because the entire system is bogged down, or they have put you too far from an antenna to be any good.

Generally, we have had our best luck at more expensive campgrounds that either charge a premium rate or bill you separately for the wifi. Of course, this is not always the case, we just stayed at the Kiva in Tucumcari, NM and the wifi was flawless at a bargain nightly rate. ($20)
Out Fishing
Howdy

As a Developer just building our first RV Resort we are wondering what this RV Community would like to see from a WIFI policy that will work for both campers and us owners.

our situation is a little different then most of the RV Resorts i see posting in this topic. We are 45min outside of a major city centre and as such our maximum bandwidth is 1mps. so for our office to run online registrations and have a decent service to customers.

also our campground is located on 73 acres of land and as such we need up to 5 of the Omni directional antennas.

( there are other options for bandwidth but these get costly we can get 10mps bandwidth but they charge close to 10$ a gigabyte that we go over our 1 GB Limit. whereas the 1Mps service has unlimited download and upload. ( the cable companies have not reached out this far as of yet) )

Any advice out there would be appreciated. so far my personal thought is to not charge for internet. but have a separate service for the office to run administration out of.
joez
QUOTE
As a Developer just building our first RV Resort we are wondering what this RV Community would like to see from a WIFI policy that will work for both campers and us owners.


We as WIFI users want unlimited access, lightening speed, free, always available WIFI on which we, and every other user, can Skype, play online games, download humongeous files, and stream multiple movies. Most of us are, however, aware that all this is not possible at most of the places we stay. I would suggest that you install the best system you can afford, provide the expertise to keep it running and then be honest with your guests. We have stayed at several places where system limitations and allowances were explained to us (in writing) and then usage was monitored and abusers excluded from the system. If the system will not support heavy use then tell us so. This is so much better than staying somewhere that advertises WIFI only to find that the system is only available at the office, or down more than up, or only available in 1/3 of the sites and nobody working knows anything about the system.

Good luck with your venture. Keep us updated as you succeed.
Don-in-GA
Not knowing your location or terrain, how far away is Cable? If you can get line of site, there is equipment to transmit 10 miles or more to bring to you from a family member, friend etc. You would be suprised how cheap you can do this. 1 Mbps is super slow and you will get alot of compaints but as a previous post mentions, just advise your customers of your limited resources and they will understand its "better then nothing". I have 85 sites in my park but only about 40 users and we use about 10 gigs per day in bandwidth usage. Make sure you have enough controll over your system to keep non customers from getting online. I use a controller that will allow me to combine up to 4 Internet providers into 1 to increase our bandwidth. Can you get more then one account at a fair price? They sometimes freak out if they know what your doing, so get the second account in a workshop or something nearby that "justifies" the second account.


QUOTE(Mayatan Lake RV Resort @ Dec 1 2011, 05:04 PM) *

Howdy

As a Developer just building our first RV Resort we are wondering what this RV Community would like to see from a WIFI policy that will work for both campers and us owners.

our situation is a little different then most of the RV Resorts i see posting in this topic. We are 45min outside of a major city centre and as such our maximum bandwidth is 1mps. so for our office to run online registrations and have a decent service to customers.

also our campground is located on 73 acres of land and as such we need up to 5 of the Omni directional antennas.

( there are other options for bandwidth but these get costly we can get 10mps bandwidth but they charge close to 10$ a gigabyte that we go over our 1 GB Limit. whereas the 1Mps service has unlimited download and upload. ( the cable companies have not reached out this far as of yet) )

Any advice out there would be appreciated. so far my personal thought is to not charge for internet. but have a separate service for the office to run administration out of.

Out Fishing
the closest town with cable is 17 km by air, 31km by road. and we have the ability to put a 15m tower on a hill with no problem from the development authority. however according to he topographical there are 3 same height hills between us and the town. what type of equipment would i need to be able to do this? i would love to be able to provide real high speed to our customers not the rural 1mps high speed that is available locally.

Thanks for the info 10 gig a day would be a lot for 1mps but hat gives me some numbers to work out with a isp over what we estimate we will do.

what type of control would you suggest. i was thinking a standard router system with all the passwords and security on.

Thanks!

QUOTE(Don-in-GA @ Jan 1 2012, 09:00 AM) *

Not knowing your location or terrain, how far away is Cable? If you can get line of site, there is equipment to transmit 10 miles or more to bring to you from a family member, friend etc. You would be suprised how cheap you can do this. 1 Mbps is super slow and you will get alot of compaints but as a previous post mentions, just advise your customers of your limited resources and they will understand its "better then nothing". I have 85 sites in my park but only about 40 users and we use about 10 gigs per day in bandwidth usage. Make sure you have enough controll over your system to keep non customers from getting online. I use a controller that will allow me to combine up to 4 Internet providers into 1 to increase our bandwidth. Can you get more then one account at a fair price? They sometimes freak out if they know what your doing, so get the second account in a workshop or something nearby that "justifies" the second account.

Don-in-GA
QUOTE(Out Fishing @ Jan 2 2012, 01:02 AM) *

the closest town with cable is 17 km by air, 31km by road. and we have the ability to put a 15m tower on a hill with no problem from the development authority. however according to he topographical there are 3 same height hills between us and the town. what type of equipment would i need to be able to do this? i would love to be able to provide real high speed to our customers not the rural 1mps high speed that is available locally.

Thanks for the info 10 gig a day would be a lot for 1mps but hat gives me some numbers to work out with a isp over what we estimate we will do.

what type of control would you suggest. i was thinking a standard router system with all the passwords and security on.

Thanks!


Here is a product that advertises 30 km. You would need one at each end but if you dont have line of sight then it would not work. I use a smaller version for a much shorter distance. This company makes some of the best equipment I have ever seen.

http://www.streakwave.com/Itemdesc.asp?ic=...D5G27%2DHP%2DUS

As for a control, I use this unit below. It creates an separate login for each user.

http://www.valuepointnet.com/controllers-nc-3500.php
Lindsay Richards
I just got a new super Droid smart phone. On my old Droid, I could tether my laptop, but not sure on this one yet. This one has a huge screen and is very fast with 4G so I might not even have to tether when I can't get WiFi.
HappyCampers6
I have to say that when camping with teenagers wifi is a definite plus. I know that a lot of folks say that technology should be left at home but apparently they have never tried to 'unplug' a teenager for any period of time and expect them to have fun. Now with that being said we take technology with us in case it rains or whatever but most of the time it's only used at night because we are busy having fun during the day.

I would have to say that if we see wifi available for a charge we would steer clear of that campground. I think free wifi is a perk and in this day and age it's almost a must. My teens have much more fun 'getting away from it all' when they can still stay caught up.
dalsgal
WiFi is free at our campground. We have a problem on occasion with people downloading things constantly and hogging the bandwidth for others, especially when several people in the same RV each have computers going at the same time. When they do that it slows things way down for others that want to just get online. Sure, we could increase the strength of the WiFi but that would be expensive and that cost would have to be absorbed by someone. We could charge for WiFi, we could raise the camping fees or we could not have the money to make improvements in other areas. With rising costs for everything CG's cannot afford to just keep spending on things without making that money back somehow. We strive to do what we can to make people happy but we have bills that must be paid, including employees. In my case, I would be willing to bet few people would work anywhere for what my husband and I are paid. We are on call 24/365, no vacation, one day off a week but are still on call, do all the yard work, pool care, maintenance, office/store, sell propane, clean bathrooms and laundry room. Yes, we don't pay rent but, even with rent added to our salary, we work about 80 hrs a week between us (not counting being on call) and we make less than $5.00 (together, not each). We do this type work because we enjoy it and, with the economy as it is, our employer cannot afford to pay us more.

Remember that what you see as free is paid in someway by someone.
docj
Just to clarify your response, I assume you are aware that increasing the "strength" of the wifi signal won't make it faster. It would be necessary to increase the size of the connection to the internet that the CG pays for (often called the "pipe"). This may not even be possible in some rural areas. What can be done is to restrict access to the major streaming sites or invest in software which can limit the bandwidth of any individual user.
kcmoedoe
QUOTE(dalsgal @ Jan 27 2013, 10:39 AM) *

WiFi is free at our campground. We have a problem on occasion with people downloading things constantly and hogging the bandwidth for others, especially when several people in the same RV each have computers going at the same time. When they do that it slows things way down for others that want to just get online. Sure, we could increase the strength of the WiFi but that would be expensive and that cost would have to be absorbed by someone. We could charge for WiFi, we could raise the camping fees or we could not have the money to make improvements in other areas. With rising costs for everything CG's cannot afford to just keep spending on things without making that money back somehow. We strive to do what we can to make people happy but we have bills that must be paid, including employees. In my case, I would be willing to bet few people would work anywhere for what my husband and I are paid. We are on call 24/365, no vacation, one day off a week but are still on call, do all the yard work, pool care, maintenance, office/store, sell propane, clean bathrooms and laundry room. Yes, we don't pay rent but, even with rent added to our salary, we work about 80 hrs a week between us (not counting being on call) and we make less than $5.00 (together, not each). We do this type work because we enjoy it and, with the economy as it is, our employer cannot afford to pay us more.

Remember that what you see as free is paid in someway by someone.

Curious as to what you would think the proper speed for an allocated system would be. It is my understanding that somewhere between 750 KBS and 1mbs is the minimum needed speed to view video clips, which is almost a requirement in surfing the web today. Wouldn't bandwidth throttling just have people staying connected longer downloading big files, since they can just have the file save and walk away while it is downloading? What is a bigger delay, someone loading a file at 20mbs and being on line for 2 minutes or have it download at 1mbs and they are logged on for 40 minutes? Not sure this isn't one of those problems that just plain doesn't have a magic solution.
rbrumfield
QUOTE(Mayatan Lake RV Resort @ Dec 1 2011, 02:04 PM) *

Howdy

As a Developer just building our first RV Resort we are wondering what this RV Community would like to see from a WIFI policy that will work for both campers and us owners.

our situation is a little different then most of the RV Resorts i see posting in this topic. We are 45min outside of a major city centre and as such our maximum bandwidth is 1mps. so for our office to run online registrations and have a decent service to customers.

also our campground is located on 73 acres of land and as such we need up to 5 of the Omni directional antennas.

( there are other options for bandwidth but these get costly we can get 10mps bandwidth but they charge close to 10$ a gigabyte that we go over our 1 GB Limit. whereas the 1Mps service has unlimited download and upload. ( the cable companies have not reached out this far as of yet) )

Any advice out there would be appreciated. so far my personal thought is to not charge for internet. but have a separate service for the office to run administration out of.


I would imagine you are going to get lots of complaints about a 1mb/ps service. It may be unlimited but it will take forever to download most things as simple as a windows update. JMHO
rbrumfield
QUOTE(joez @ Dec 1 2011, 02:34 PM) *

We as WIFI users want unlimited access, lightening speed, free, always available WIFI on which we, and every other user, can Skype, play online games, download humongeous files, and stream multiple movies. Most of us are, however, aware that all this is not possible at most of the places we stay. I would suggest that you install the best system you can afford, provide the expertise to keep it running and then be honest with your guests. We have stayed at several places where system limitations and allowances were explained to us (in writing) and then usage was monitored and abusers excluded from the system. If the system will not support heavy use then tell us so. This is so much better than staying somewhere that advertises WIFI only to find that the system is only available at the office, or down more than up, or only available in 1/3 of the sites and nobody working knows anything about the system.

Good luck with your venture. Keep us updated as you succeed.


In all of the parks that I have every visited in 20+ years I have had exactly one owner tell me about the WiFi. He was located in a rural part of Texas and told me day one that the Internet was Ok for email and maybe some web browsing on a good day. But as he also added it was available at no extra charge. My reply....Thanks I appreciate the heads up.
dalsgal
We have 3MBPS. My husband explained it to me like this (I'm not a big techo person). If you have a small battery and attach one small light bulb it is pretty bright. If you attach a second light bulb they must share the power. The more light bulbs the more sharing of that power. Then you come along and add a large bulb (like someone downloading) and it gets the power and the little ones fade or go out.
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(HappyCampers6 @ Jan 25 2013, 11:05 PM) *

I know that a lot of folks say that technology should be left at home but apparently they have never tried to 'unplug' a teenager for any period of time and expect them to have fun.


It can be done. Most places we go don't have wi-fi, nor even 3G, and cell is spotty. Kids can't wait until next trip (ages 15, 13, and 10).
Lindsay Richards
QUOTE
Remember that what you see as free is paid in someway by someone.



Does this apply to welfare and "free" healthcare too?
Fitzjohnfan
QUOTE(HappiestCamper @ Jan 28 2013, 09:12 AM) *

It can be done. Most places we go don't have wi-fi, nor even 3G, and cell is spotty. Kids can't wait until next trip (ages 15, 13, and 10).


I agree, my boys, age 16 and 12 are perfectly happy camping where thy can fish, ride their bikes, shoot arrows and bb guns. Sure they spend their fair share of time playing video games when they can, but wi-fi does not need to be present for them to have fun.
docj
If you aren't already aware of it, yesterday Netflix put online an entire 13-episode new series entitled "House of Cards" starring Kevin Spacey. Although we have already watched the first two shows and have enjoyed them, the reason for this post is simply to point out that this event took place. It appears to be the first time an expensive show with a well-known cast has gone this route, bypassing the HBO, Showtime channels which would have been a more normal venue. Netflix is hinting that this may be only the first of a whole line of "made for streaming" TV content. What's made this even more unusual is that Netflix has made the entire series available at once, no waiting until next week to watch the next episode.

Of course, the implications of this to the entertainment industry are enormous. Essentially, a content provider (a movie producer) has bypassed the entire distribution system and is providing commercial-free content to those willing to pay the intermediary (Netflix) to stream it to them. It's the next logical step beyond the "on demand" process we have become accustomed to.

Once technological evolution like this begins it is hard to stuff the genie back in the bottle, so I expect, over time, we will see more of this not just by Netflix, but maybe also by Amazon and others. This has huge implications for internet providers, campground operators, etc, since it will stress the data-handling capacity of their networks. Sure, nothing has really changed since people can already stream video, but if first-run content becomes more available via streaming they are going to be frustrated if they discover they can't spend their weekend "camping" trip watching a marathon of their favorite shows episodes. Yet another problem for campground owners to wrestle with. As if the question of "free wifi" wasn't difficult enough to deal with on its own.
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