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DXSMac
I am staying at Jacks Landing in Grants Pass. Nice RV park! If you ever stay here, I have two GPS tips for you.

The park is located on Morgan Lane. When GPS tells you to turn at Hillcrest, OBEY IT! Even though you will pass right through Morgan Lane. Making this tactical error will cost you five minutes of having to go around the block. Ok, my bad.

NOW! If the GPS tells you to go around the La Quinta hotel, DISREGARD! Instead, weasle through the La Quinta and Jack's Landing is right there. If you "obey" your GPS at this point, it will cost you dearly. The GPS will take you up a narrow, steep road to a DEAD END. The only way out is to drive backwards, down the grade, and around a sharp, blind curve. When I checked in, I asked the desk clerk what the "body count" was for people who obeyed their GPS and went up the dead end street. TOO MANY TIMES.

Anyone else have a snafu with their GPS?

JJ
HappiestCamper
Haven't had my GPS long enough yet. So far it's gotten me to the right place every time (unlike my brother's directions to Disney World last spring).

When Yahoo first came out with maps, I bragged to my wife that I had directions to my uncle's place ready to go (this was 10 years ago). I learned quickly that they liked to put future roads on their routes.
pianotuna
Hi,

My GPS last summer very happily recalculated a route through the mountains in British Columbia--it was going to save me about 30 miles of travel. NEAT!

The road started out paved, for about 15 miles. Then it turned into well maintained gravel. Then wash board. Finally I came to a junction for the turn off. There was another vehicle there that had local plates on it. I waved them down and they said--"yes, there is a road--if you have a four wheel drive vehicle you *might* make it through" but don't rely on your cell phone to call for help.

I turned around, drove back over the washboard, gravel and pavement and got back on the "real road". Ah the sins of belief!
DXSMac
QUOTE(pianotuna @ Sep 8 2008, 04:39 PM) *

Hi,

My GPS last summer very happily recalculated a route through the mountains in British Columbia--it was going to save me about 30 miles of travel. NEAT!

The road started out paved, for about 15 miles. Then it turned into well maintained gravel. Then wash board. Finally I came to a junction for the turn off. There was another vehicle there that had local plates on it. I waved them down and they said--"yes, there is a road--if you have a four wheel drive vehicle you *might* make it through" but don't rely on your cell phone to call for help.

I turned around, drove back over the washboard, gravel and pavement and got back on the "real road". Ah the sins of belief!


Ok, your snafu ranks up there with my snafu. Both were terrifying, but in different ways. In my situation, the sharp corner I had to back around, um, if you got one wheel off the edge of the road, you would go over a bank. I know I came close, I don't want to know how close.

JJ
RLM
I prefer using a GPS program on my laptop instead of a stand alone GPS device. Nonetheless, I made the mistake of choosing the most direct route once. Ended up on a dead-end road trying to figure out how to turn a 40 ft rig around. I suspect that if had a GPS device instead of an expensive laptop, that device would now be road kill!! dry.gif
John S.
My GPS has a setting for truck bus so I can stay on the big roads. It sometimes wants to take me another way but I also map it out by hand and look at a real map before going anywhere. I have covered 200K miles with it in the motorhome and it is good when you get close to the destination most of the time.
BBear
I must admit, I still map out the old fashioned way (mostly because I love to do it) rather than using a GPS I got as a Christmas gift a few years ago.

And, since my mapping has yet to stear me wrong and I actually enjoy the time it takes me to map out, I don't plan changing to GPS any time soon. Although, I do have an interest in perhaps using my GPS to do some geocaching sometime in the future.

When I did actually try out the GPS for the first time I did an "alternate route" because there is this mountain that I have to travel down near my home that I have no idea why but it scares the willies out of me (people out west would probably laugh at me, because in comparison to the mountains out there, this mountain wouldn't even classify as a molehill, lol....which also is very strange, I've traveled through the Rockies and the Smokies and was never afraid of any of the roads I traveled on or afraid of any of the mountains I went up and down, but this "molehill" terrifies me, so I wanted to see if there were any alternate routes for it and one came up and I gave it a try and the first couple of roads it led me down I was familiar with and then the roads went from pavement to dirt and then started getting narrower and narrower til I couldn't go any further because all what was left was a "trail" which is exactly what it is...it's a marked nature trail that takes you down over the mountain...I sat and laughed for a few minutes...then proceeded to disconnect my GPS and put it back in the box and it's been sitting on the shelf of my garage ever since, LOL!
DXSMac
BBears, oh my! Sounds worse than my "back down the hill" experience. I also believe that by mapping the old fashioned way (which I haven't done for awhile... unsure.gif ), you keep your brain active and alive. Which keeps you "young" intellectually. I have started relying more on the GPS instead of mapping it myself, and I think I lose brain cells that way.....

JJ
rodman
My wife and I decided to take a long weekend so we could take our new TT out on her maiden voyage to Bodega Bay. Our new trailer was 10' longer than the old one. We decide to use GPS since we had not been then before. Well if anyone has seen the movie The Birds, not much has changed in the area except the addition of a different way into Bodega Bay. GPS didn't know of the new way so we followed the instructions and made a turn onto what seemed like a decent road until we actually started to climb instead of decend toward the coast. After about 2 miles the road suddenly turned into a very narrow single lane. I really didn't want to try and back this thing down about a mile since there were no places to turn around 60' of truck and trailer. We decided to push on and after about another what seemed like 50 miles, actually only about 2 the road opened up to a small 2 lane road in an old part of town. It did actualy deadend right in front of the RV park. Had we kept going straight on our original course we would have been there in 10 minutes instead of an hour of white knuckle broken road. Did I mention 1 side was a fairly severe drop. I prefer to use maps, old ways, good ways.
DXSMac
QUOTE(rodman @ Sep 10 2008, 10:31 AM) *

My wife and I decided to take a long weekend so we could take our new TT out on her maiden voyage to Bodega Bay. Our new trailer was 10' longer than the old one. We decide to use GPS since we had not been then before. Well if anyone has seen the movie The Birds, not much has changed in the area except the addition of a different way into Bodega Bay. GPS didn't know of the new way so we followed the instructions and made a turn onto what seemed like a decent road until we actually started to climb instead of decend toward the coast. After about 2 miles the road suddenly turned into a very narrow single lane. I really didn't want to try and back this thing down about a mile since there were no places to turn around 60' of truck and trailer. We decided to push on and after about another what seemed like 50 miles, actually only about 2 the road opened up to a small 2 lane road in an old part of town. It did actualy deadend right in front of the RV park. Had we kept going straight on our original course we would have been there in 10 minutes instead of an hour of white knuckle broken road. Did I mention 1 side was a fairly severe drop. I prefer to use maps, old ways, good ways.


Oh my! ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif That's why I don't dare haul a TT. I would have issues with that just on normal driving, let alone what you went through! And I know what you man by "severe drop."

JJ
in80ways
I bought a new Garmin this year when the Rand McNally trip planner routing that I had paid for online turned out to be a bit inaccurate.

The Garmin came with 2006 data which I paid to update to the 2009 data which unfortunately has proven not to have a lot of road changes which appear to have occured more than a year or two ago.

The Garmin has sent me on quite a few wrong turns on down some scary lonely roads as well as telling me to make a turn when there was no such turn to make. I loved it when my destination happened to be an empty field 36 miles from the true location I was trying to reach.

I have learned to question Garmin's every turn and if the turn is not on a State, US or Interstate Hwy, I better make sure that I am making the right choice. I wish that they would come out with an RV or Big Rig version that is smart enough to know that you don't want to drive on back country narrow roads with 10 MPH hairpin turns on a 12% decline. Thanks for your post.
Lee and Fran
I have been led astray couple of times. One of those was a shortest route that led me to a dirt road. Thanks but no thanks. The other was a road that no longer existed and led me into the parking lot of a business. Unless we get these things updated by letting the companies know we will always have these problems.
Kirk
Ours also has the preference settings when you plan a route, but the operator of ours has failed to make sure that all limits are proper because he moves it between the car and the motorhome. In one case, that foolish guy failed to change the setting back from auto to bus and planned a route. In included routing to an RV park which passed through a residential neighborhood with very steep, narrow streets and short turns. And all of this happened right at rush hour! When I finally arrived at the park I commented on the route that we had just come over.

The person at the desk told me that that route would be just fine for a car but that it would be impossible to get a motorhome or fifth wheel through it! It was not impossible, but there are still marks on my steering wheel from the tight grip I had on it but my wife got nearly all of the sweat stains out of the driver's seat. And I think that she put my undies in the trash!
mpj
From a campground owner: if there are ANY questions in your mind - contact the campground of choice - DO NOT RELY solely on your GPS.

Our park is not on GPS because we are located on a gravel road - it is short, but it is still gravel - with a city street sign. Usually GPS puts my customers 5 miles away on a road with a similar name, that is paved. We have driving directions on our web site. I know it is old fashion, but since new technology does not work, the old way still does!!

Happy travels! Thanks for listening.
pianotuna
Hi,

Why not post GPS coordinates in your directions? That will get past your access road not being "on the map".

QUOTE(mpj @ Sep 15 2008, 03:33 PM) *

From a campground owner: if there are ANY questions in your mind - contact the campground of choice - DO NOT RELY solely on your GPS.

Our park is not on GPS because we are located on a gravel road - it is short, but it is still gravel - with a city street sign. Usually GPS puts my customers 5 miles away on a road with a similar name, that is paved. We have driving directions on our web site. I know it is old fashion, but since new technology does not work, the old way still does!!

Happy travels! Thanks for listening.

Doraville
My wife and I had a doozy of an argument on our way out of Salt Lake City this morning. We argue so seldom that it scares our kids to death when it happens (I remember our two older daughters crying once when they saw us arguing). We had pulled over on the side of an on-ramp to continue our “discussion”. I noticed that a Policeman had a motorist pulled over on the same on-ramp. He stuck around after he was done with the motorist to make sure that we didn't kill each other (I think he grew concerned when he saw me throw the road atlas out the window).

It all started when our GPS navigator told us to get off at the wrong exit from the Interstate. We've found that these gadgets work best when you already know where you're going.

I mentioned in an earlier post that we refer to it as “her” because it has a female voice. Now it is just referred to as “that woman...”.
DXSMac
QUOTE(Doraville @ Sep 16 2008, 04:48 AM) *


I mentioned in an earlier post that we refer to it as “her” because it has a female voice. Now it is just referred to as “that woman...”.


"That woman" that you did NOT have........

(hee hee hee..... tongue.gif tongue.gif tongue.gif )
gwbischoff
QUOTE(Doraville @ Sep 16 2008, 06:48 AM) *


I mentioned in an earlier post that we refer to it as “her” because it has a female voice. Now it is just referred to as “that woman...”.


That's funny. We've gone a step further. My Camry has an in-dash nav system that my daughter nicknamed "Shelby". Dunno' why, she just started calling "her" that one day.

We also have a Garmin c550 and the voice actually is referred to as "Jill" in the selection menu.

I also map our routes out the old fashioned way and use the GPS computer to let the kids know if "we're there yet". Also it's good to know how far away the next gas/food/rest area are.

We take Jill with us in the RV. We have a lot of fun when she chooses to pronounce "KOA" as "koh-wah".

Shelby gave us our biggest heart stopper though. We were staying at the Santa Cruz KOA and looking for a place to eat in nearby Watsonville. Shelby gave this shortcut:

Punch this into Google Maps:
"Harkins Slough Rd
Watsonville, CA 95076"

Notice anything interesting about the Harkins Slough crossing?

Ya. It ain't there.

We approached that point from the west (downhill) and made that (blind) left turn and were immediately confronted by a chain link fence and water. Fortunately, that was in my Camry and not in the Winnie. Uphill backwards would not have been fun.
DXSMac
I think I can guess what the "Shelby" is.....

"Shelby comin' round the mountain when she comes....."

Just a guess.....

JJ
FosterImposters
QUOTE(John S. @ Sep 9 2008, 06:30 AM) *

...but I also ...look at a real map before going anywhere...


Could not have said it better! wink.gif
Had a 40' pusher pulling a pickup recount a harrowing experience trying to drive up and OVER Astoria (read San Francisco streets) rather than just eyeball a map and stay on Business 101 to reach the RV park. Now I know what dug those impressive furrows in the straight up/down Astoria concrete streets... ohmy.gif
dementinator
I can remember visiting a place in California called "Lake Isobella", if I remember correctly, my father wanted to do a spot of fishing there so we pulled into a KOA nearby.

At this point I had a 37ft bounder class 'A' rented from El Monte and all had gone well thus far, we left the CG on the instructions given and started back towards The West Coast, everything was fine and dandy for about 15 miles or so, nice good dual lane highway, then doom came to call, a sign marked "Vehicles over 30ft not recommended", hmmm, well whats another 7 ft or so eh?.

We carried on and I was then faced with trying to get this monster RV down 16 miles or so of hairpin bends with a nasty drop over the side, also local drivers were right up my ass pushing me on the whole time and the pull outs were way to small to get the RV into.

Took over an hour to get down, my dad spent most of it sat on the toilet I think and I had to peel my fingers of the steering wheel and eyeballs off the windshield when finally down.

The funny thing was, a week later I returned the RV to the depot and one of the employees there INSISTED he drove it round to the unload area, which he did and promptly pranged into a wall!!!! All the miles I did and all the bad roads that bus had been on over the last few weeks and some idiot drove it 50 yards and crashed it!!!
DXSMac
QUOTE(dementinator @ Oct 20 2008, 06:20 AM) *


At this point I had a 37ft bounder class 'A' rented from El Monte and all had gone well thus far, we left the CG on the instructions given and started back towards The West Coast, everything was fine and dandy for about 15 miles or so, nice good dual lane highway, then doom came to call, a sign marked "Vehicles over 30ft not recommended", hmmm, well whats another 7 ft or so eh?.

We carried on and I was then faced with trying to get this monster RV down 16 miles or so of hairpin bends with a nasty drop over the side, also local drivers were right up my ass pushing me on the whole time and the pull outs were way to small to get the RV into.

Took over an hour to get down, my dad spent most of it sat on the toilet I think and I had to peel my fingers of the steering wheel and eyeballs off the windshield when finally down.




Sorry about getting the RV crashed, but not your fault. Sounds like you tried to go to the same place in Oregon that I tried to go to, I had a rental car, and sign said, "no vehicles over TWENTY FIVE feet."

Hairpins corners like crazy and no place to pull off!

JJ
FosterImposters
QUOTE(dementinator @ Oct 20 2008, 06:20 AM) *

...Took over an hour to get down, my dad spent most of it sat on the toilet I think and I had to peel my fingers of the steering wheel and eyeballs off the windshield when finally down....

I am laughing myself sick... blink.gif
Welcome Dementintor, to the wonderful world of RVing!!! As the passenger...I TOTALLY understand your dad. Have been known to kiss the ground when we reached a destination. THEN there was the time I was at the wheel, and the brakes took a holiday...on a looooong downhill around Cedar Breaks, Utah. I swear angels guided us to a level place to pull off so the breaks could cool and my stomach relocate!
DXSMac
QUOTE(FosterImposters @ Oct 20 2008, 10:21 PM) *

THEN there was the time I was at the wheel, and the brakes took a holiday...on a looooong downhill around Cedar Breaks, Utah. I swear angels guided us to a level place to pull off so the breaks could cool and my stomach relocate!


That's why Western states, with the mountains in them, and steep graded roads, often have the "truck escapes" off some of those steep grades. It's for those situations.

Sometimes I have taken one in a car just for kicks. Haven't tried one in an RV, hope I don't have to.

JJ
blu-meanie
I have two. One was in Arizona, the GPS said to take a right and after I did, I was in on a desert road that narrowed to about 10 feet wide towing a 27 foot trailer. I got some backing practice that day.
The second was on a highway between Point Arena, CA and Boonville. The road name was Mountain View Road, I think. Well, about 200 yards onto this road it says vehicles with trailers not recomended. A bit too late. It didn't look all that bad, so I proceded onward since most of the road signs aren't really that accurate. It had 12%+ grades, was thirty miles long, and took over three hours to negociate. Nice road, one lane over much of it, hairpin ess turns, and did I mention the logging trucks? Along the side of the road also had some wrecked trailers that apparently didn't make it. I did mention the logging trucks, right?
mikel
Going through Yosemite pulling a 33.5' fifth wheel. GPS shows nice shortcuts, etc. and you can program it for certain situations. A rule of thumb, call ahead, especially in the mountains and before encountering winding roads. We called ahead, got information that cost about 70 more miles but it was much safer.

mk
baraff
We had three mishaps with our Mio GPS (NEVER buy the cheap GPS) :
The first was near Galena, Illinois, on our way to a COE campground on the Mississippi. The most "direct route" took us down a narrow back country road which mutated into a rutted gravel road which ran along a steep ravine, with washouts at the switchback curves. We were towing our 26' Travel Trailer. It ended up at a narrow underpass with a VERY low overhead, we made it but anyone with a 5th wheel would not have.
The second time was in Hot Springs, Arkansas on our way to Lake Quachita State Park. We ended up in a rural residential neighborhood. The road begin to deteriorate and just as I was about to start looking for a turn-around spot we rounded a 90 degree curve and there was a stream running across the road!. I couldn't back up, couldn't turn around, the only choice was to throw it in 4wd and hope for the best. The water was up over the hubs but we powered through.
The third time was the best. Somewhere in Kentucky the GPS told us to turn right which we did and ended up in a VERY exclusive gated community of million dollar homes. The guard at the gate didn't want to let us in but there was no way to turn around and he had no choice. We cruised in and finally found a cul de sac to turn around in. We passed several Mercedes, Porsches and Jaguars on the way out. We felt very out of place.
I hardly ever use Mr Mio anymore, the technology has a LONG way to go.
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(baraff @ Nov 23 2008, 11:25 PM) *

<snip>The third time was the best. Somewhere in Kentucky the GPS told us to turn right which we did and ended up in a VERY exclusive gated community of million dollar homes. The guard at the gate didn't want to let us in but there was no way to turn around and he had no choice. We cruised in and finally found a cul de sac to turn around in. We passed several Mercedes, Porsches and Jaguars on the way out. We felt very out of place.
<snip>

laugh.gif
What would have made it better is if you had a musical horn like the Gornikes (sp?) or Dukes of Hazard - just to alert everybody to look out for the trailer in their neighborhood laugh.gif
firewarden
We just went from Yuma AZ to Fountain of Youth Spa in Niland CA. My Magellan GPS (Meg) sent us down miles of dirt road, then announced we had arrived. It was the middle of the deset with nothing around. Not even the restaurant, the GSP claimed was there. Good thing the cell phone worked for directions from there. When we left there we punched in Portland OR. She sent us west on I-10 which was right, then turn right on a highway west of Palm Springs for 5 miles, then make a legal u-turn and end up back at the I-10 where we turned off. Good thing fuel cost less now, for all the extra running around Meg sends us.
RanMan
I am a park owner, and I have detailed directions and GPS coordinates posted on my website. Nevertheless, a couple of months ago I received a frantic call from a guest who had reserved a site. They were to be a late check-in. Around 9:30 pm they called to tell me they were lost AND trapped in their RV. Following the GPS led them down the wrong road and when they tried to turn the motorhome around in the dark, one wheel left the road and they almost turned over into a deep drainage ditch. The door was jammed in the dirt so they couldn't get out. A local resident found them before I did and called 911. We had two firetrucks, two police cars, an ambulance and wrecker called to rescue them. By the way, they were seniors and new to RVing. What a way to start. Thankfully, they were fine and we escorted them to a site and backed them in around 1 am. The motorhome suffered minor damage, mainly to the doorstep. I'm sure they are still entertaining folks around the campfire with this story, but it could have been a disaster.
The basic problem with GPS, Google, Mapquest, etc is the data they are using is just too old. I live in a subdivision that was an empty field for as long as anyone remembers. 50 years ago it was a grass landing strip for planes. GPS shows it to be an "Airport". The couple who got lost were being directed down a road that does not exist except in the databases used by mapping programs. I have contacted as many of these data providers as I possibly can, using their procedures for correcting inaccuracies, all to no avail. It's no wonder that you have to "sign" a release form every time you turn on your GPS. Additionally, I am prevented from providing adequate signage by strict laws limiting advertising on state highways.
Ingsky
When we were scouting out the cg where we are staying for the winter, we initally phoned, got the address and did a Yahoo map. I'm glad we didn't have the fifth wheel behind us as we were on dirt roads in the desert. (We'd parked the fiver at another rv park in order to do our scouting for a better place.) We got so lost, so we phoned and were told to park at a cross street, he'd find us and lead us to the park. He did and we discovered a wonderful place. He told us that maps that use gps always mess people up. He said folks have this problem all the time. This is the first time a Yahoo map has mislead us. cool.gif
mastercraft
We were leaving Campus RV park outside of Kansas City heading towards Nebraska. The GPS sent us a different way out since we were heading in a different direction. About 3 miles into our trip we encountered a bridge with only 12 feet of clearance. I was in my truck with a 38 foot 5th wheel and my dad was following in his motorhome. We were in the process of turning around in a 4 lane road when a nice gentleman stopped and gave us another route. He was driving a dually with a 5th wheel hitch. GPS was set with truck/bus setting.
DXSMac
I took a short trip this last weekend, and my GPS led me to a "dead end" street and expected me to continue through! I had to back out of it. I hate backing up in an RV!

JJ
Cap'n Easy
I've had my Garmin for two years and always have it with me, whether in the motorhome or the car. I consider it indispensible in the RV, especially for the text-to-voice directions. BUT I quickly learned to study my route options on a good ol' map first and to NOT rely solely on Garmin's ability to make the best selection. So far it hasn't lead me into any hair-raising surprises as others here have mentioned. Regardless, I've unhooked/rehooked my toad on more than one occassion so I could turn around to get out of a bind. All in all, I love GPS technology and use mine a lot.
joez
I have used gps systems since car manufacturers started to offer them as ridiculously priced options and, for the most part, have had great success with them. Most of the time when I second guess the machine I am wrong. One time, though, I wish I had paid attention. I had called a campground in Tennessee for a reservation and the clerk had mentioned that I should take the 2nd turn onto ***** road (don't remember the name). GPS told me to turn at the 1st turn and I took it. I was in a 35 foot mh with a towd - just me and the two dogs. Wife was to join us the next day. By taking the first turn I ended up on a very narrow Tennessee road barely wide enough to travel and came across a series of turns that I could not make with the towd attached. Well, the dogs do not drive worth a darn and I did not want to back the towd up and then walk back and back the mh up. I ended up disconnecting the towd, driving the mh forward, walking back for the car, etc, etc, etc. Had three turns to navigate over about 3 miles. Took me most of the afternoon but finally got to a point (where the campground had told me to turn) where I could hook the towd back up and continue. I still depend on the GPS - I just double check, especially where local roads are involved.BTW, dogs never told on me and DW still has no idea what I did.
DXSMac
Joez, ok, your experience just topped mine (which was going up a steep dead end road, and having to back all the way down and go around a curve...)

JJ
Galli
ha, ha, ha and I thought I was the inept one not being able to use the GPS; off course I learned the basic at my own expense.
the modern GPS provide certain facilities and handicap at the same time, I have a Magellan Crossover that gives me the option in a trip to take the shortest road or the fastest road or the one with no pay toll or the one with mainly highways.
these options cannot be used in combination, therefore, you have to choose what you consider most appropriate for your trip, namely, if you are travelling with a Motor Home or a 5th W., you better chose the highway.
I wish to warn you about the shortest rout, please, please, DO NOT choose this option UNLESS you know the route in advance because the GPS will take you on the shortest way between the points regardless of type terrene.
I had this experience once and fortunately I was travel with the truck only and I saved most likely 10 - 15 miles of road but I had to go through paths in bushes and at the end of it I had to cut down a lock since the access to the main road was barred by a gate and I did not have the option to turn around since the path was barely the size of my truck.
DXSMac
Galli, BEEN THERE! "shortest" sometimes is the shortest mileage wise, but takes you another half hour longer to get there.

JJ
Galli
QUOTE(Galli @ Apr 5 2009, 10:18 AM) *

ha, ha, ha and I thought I was the inept one not being able to use the GPS; off course I learned the basic at my own expense.
the modern GPS provide certain facilities and handicap at the same time, I have a Magellan Crossover that gives me the option in a trip to take the shortest road or the fastest road or the one with no pay toll or the one with mainly highways.
these options cannot be used in combination, therefore, you have to choose what you consider most appropriate for your trip, namely, if you are travelling with a Motor Home or a 5th W., you better chose the highway.
I wish to warn you about the shortest rout, please, please, DO NOT choose this option UNLESS you know the route in advance because the GPS will take you on the shortest way between the points regardless of type terrene.
I had this experience once and fortunately I was travel with the truck only and I saved most likely 10 - 15 miles of road but I had to go through paths in bushes and at the end of it I had to cut down a lock since the access to the main road was barred by a gate and I did not have the option to turn around since the path was barely the size of my truck.

I still remember the good time when we had to look at the map and use our brain to decide where to go and how to get there.
Ta, ta Galli
DXSMac
Had another GPS issue a couple days ago. I was driving through Gallup, New Mexico and wanted to get back on the freeway. Magellan said, "freeway entrance on the right." Normally, those kinds of "on ramps" are on the right. So, I moved to the right lane. WRONG! Entrance ramp was on the left and it was a cloverleaf! Oops, too late, can't move over. Had to go around the block, and the block I went around had very narrow roads. Yikes.

JJ
Galli
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Apr 17 2009, 08:40 PM) *

Had another GPS issue a couple days ago. I was driving through Gallup, New Mexico and wanted to get back on the freeway. Magellan said, "freeway entrance on the right." Normally, those kinds of "on ramps" are on the right. So, I moved to the right lane. WRONG! Entrance ramp was on the left and it was a cloverleaf! Oops, too late, can't move over. Had to go around the block, and the block I went around had very narrow roads. Yikes.

JJ

Yes I know, life is difficult, you complain because the GPS is goofing off, I have a GPS telling me what to do and my wife insisting in giving me different directions ph34r.gif , she is always focusing on the map and when the GPS tells me to turn left or right, she immediately ask me WHY ? sad.gif How do I know, I am only ther driver and would like to follow the GPS indication, after all I spent about $ 400 for it sad.gif and I would like to believe in what it says, but, for a good living in the family at the time I am following her direction and ph34r.gif naturally, as soon as I obey my wife the GPS starts screaming and telling me that I am to a wrong direction ohmy.gif , to take the first road on the left/right and ....naturally my wife insist that the GPS is stupid, or, who programmed it didn't know what he/she was doing and this goes on and on with the result that people tells me why I look so old when I am only 70 and I cannot say the truth :lol
HappiestCamper
Just had a fun one - put me in the middle of a horse pasture! Fortunately, was able to to get it turned around.
Jerry S.
I'm kinda glad this topic got revived. There were 2 stories in the news just before Christmas about people out northwest. As remember, both stories were about people using GPS getting lost in Oregon because the GPS sent them onto unplowed, secondary mountain roads. The story on which I heard the most information, talked of an older couple going from Reno to Portland to visit family for the holidays. The GPS routed them on to a forrest service road and they we stranded for almost 3 days before they were found. This story wasn't about people in an RV but it is certainly a pertinent example of how a little old-fashioned planning with a map would have prevented this almost tragic situation.
John Blue
Jerry S,

Some people have no common sense and need a GPS to return back home from a trip to local store. The write up also said the GPS saved the couple as well. One cell phone was GPS equipped and the local law office used that information to find the couple on a road no one used in winter months. If we see a deal like this we stop and look at paper maps and ask do we wish to do this. GPS are good in lots of cases. We tour in places like Chicago or Philadelphia and found it is time to have lunch. Now we turn on GPS and find a place close by, saves you time and mileage looking for some place.

We have people here in town that have lived close by 40 plus years and can not find the local Home Depot yet. As I ride with some people at every turn you need to tell them right here or move over to the left.

The couple had two cell phones and full tank of gas in car plus stuff to eat and stuff to stay warm. They got that part right. One cell phone would not pick up cell tower and other only at imes and very weak. Good luck the one with GPS did work at last.
dalsgal
If you put the address of our CG in it will take you some place miles away. I always tell campers to put the town in and we are 1 1/2 miles south of town. In a few weeks we are going to have a bus conversion rally here. For those that want it we will have the actual co-ordinance for them to put in. Can you image 2 dozen 35-40 foot bus conversions, most with toads, in a line driving down the dusty, twisty, narrow dirt road that the GPS says they should take? Of course, I do think it would make a funny picture. (yes, my sense of humor is warped).
John Blue
Most GPS addresses are wrong by a small amount or in some cases miles off. Good Sam 2010 book now had the (we hope) correct address on most campgrounds. I found a new campground last week and the web page GPS address was off by miles. RV people will be happy to find this place.
grim509
So far so good (knock on wood) as far as not being led astray by the GPS. Sometimes I think it gives us some directions that would be better, but no white knuckle moments yet.

For those of you with large travel trailers or motorhomes, it may be worth the investment of getting a "trucker" GPS. I know some of the regular ones have that as an option on the directions setting, but the "trucker" GPS are a whole other item all together. A bit more expensive, but I've been told they're great at keeping you off the narrow, windy, hilly roads some of you have encountered. Most good truck stops will carry these GPS units.
agood214
So I felt the need to add a reply... :-)

Of all the places to be off in a map - it was Campingworld in Valencia, California.

I had my Garmin, I had my backup of the printout of the Google maps and was ready to roll.

It's really the "last mile" that gets you I got off the freeway turned and the gps is pushing me up a road that's going into a state park, it got narrow fast - and at some point you have to say - oh this must be the way, then wait a minute.... oh oh... not good in a 34 foot diesel Super C.

Luckily there was a fire turnout after a mile and a seven point turn and I was on my was back down. No cell service , but when I went back down the hill a short bit and was able to call the store they said - oh that happens all the time.

mapquest actually had it right, google for a change was wrong and so was Garmin- and admitted it.

Oh by the way the Trucker GPS like the Garmin 456T has 4 very bad problems currently, as I owned one for a bit to try it out that make it really not useful to RV'ers, honestly I'd love to love it but they have to fix it.

1. It only has truck mode - not RV mode. so it assumes you are a commercial vehicle - that means it's screaming at you all over urban areas as you are a truck.....and not supposed to be there. that's mroe dangerous distracting to me driving potentially, I need the truck routes, low clearance data sharp curves, but hey I'm not a commercial vehicle.

2. The unit does not like trip interruptions or changes in route or it will reboot - this is just a plain bug.

3. No audio output jack - it's too quiet - ever tired hearing something over a diesel ?

4. It's not big enough should be 5 inches or 7 like the older 7200 Streetpilot.

grim509
Good points on the trucker GPS. Maybe some others will work? It's a matter of time before an RV GPS setting comes out, hopefully sooner than later.

It's not fun when it routes a detour and there's 5 screaming kids in the back of the van, and you're pulling a pup through a fancy-schmancy neighborhood lol
lunchbox67
The expierences that i have had in my GPS days are that if you set it to take you the shortest route you will end up going thru some bad country roads, then if you set it to the fastest route you will go thru the mountians of virginia and down a two lane road using all brakes you have....so i would recommend using a road atlas along with the GPS to map out where you would like to go the GPS will recalculate route and head you on a good path. This same GPS took me to a walmart that had moved 14 years prior to that location that is very frustrating ..... mad.gif
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