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dementinator
Hi there folks, I am from the United Kingdom and have jsut signed up here and wanted to say hi.

Before you all wonder what a Limey is doing in a forum that is about Camp Grounds etc, its because I am a serial Rv'er and have visted the US every year since 1992 and hired an RV and driven thousands and thousands of miles over the years all over the US.

I have seen many changes over the years and started with a small basic Cruise America RV at first and then switched to El Monte 12 years ago and now enjoy one of there great 35ft Class 'A's with all the extras, I truly believe there is no better way to see the US and despite the improvements to the RVs etc one thing has remained constant, the wonderful and interesting folks met along the way and the great people keeping these sites running, it can be easy thats for sure.

Next Septembers RV is booked and we look forward to seeing where the road takes us.

The reviews on this forum are really useful and I have submitted some of my own I feel may be useful.

Hope to chat to many folks here.
FosterImposters

cool.gif Welcome aboard Dementinator! Always great to have another RVer's insights to this way of life. Cheers!
Lindsay Richards
We certainly need and appreciate Europeans coming to America and helping out our Rving community by spending money. We have wonderful Rving all over the country. I think now that there is a favorable rate between the Euro and the dollar, this would be a great time for others to do what you are doing. Please continue coming and bring some friends and associates. You might try putting up a British flag on your coach and Iíll bet you will meet more interesting people. We recently had a great talk with a couple from Holland overnighting in a Wal-Mart parking lot in Panama City, Florida. They had a Cruise America Class C.
dementinator
QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Oct 15 2008, 09:34 AM) *

We certainly need and appreciate Europeans coming to America and helping out our Rving community by spending money. We have wonderful Rving all over the country. I think now that there is a favorable rate between the Euro and the dollar, this would be a great time for others to do what you are doing. Please continue coming and bring some friends and associates. You might try putting up a British flag on your coach and Iíll bet you will meet more interesting people. We recently had a great talk with a couple from Holland overnighting in a Wal-Mart parking lot in Panama City, Florida. They had a Cruise America Class C.


Funnily enough in 2004 when I Drove from NYC to LA, I had a "Union Jack" in the back of the coach and it was interesting to see the reactions (positive).

The pound does have a favourable rate against the Dollar but not quite as good as a few months ago, same financial problems in the UK as everywhere it seems.

As for my next trip, another Class A is booked courtesy of El Monte for Sept 15th 2009 and I am already looking forward to it as well.

The only part of the trips I dislike is the 12 hours or so staring at the back of someones head on a plane to get there, but its worth it.
Lindsay Richards
Talking to people from other countries and other areas of our countries is one of the fun parts of RV'ing. Lots of Americans can trace their heritage back to the UK.
dementinator
QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Oct 15 2008, 06:48 PM) *

Talking to people from other countries and other areas of our countries is one of the fun parts of RV'ing. Lots of Americans can trace their heritage back to the UK.


Theres a lot of things I love about RV'ing...
Like you said, you meet lots of interesting people you wouldnt meet otherwise

FOr someone like myself who is comming from abroad it alows us to see how life is like in the USA, I have to organise things myself, use the roads, use taxis and public transport and buy our own food etc, its not all done for me like a planned "coach tour".

If I dont like someplace, then its simple, right foot down and I am out of there.

You dont get that sinking feeling when you are 60 miles from your hotel that something vital has been left behind.

YOu have a wonderful view of the road and dont have to worry about "bathroom hunting" at the side of the highway.

If the site you have stopped at for the night isnt so good, well, close the blinds, shut the door and all is still well 'inside' no horrid bed, no dirty bathroom...try that at a bad motel.

Most of the folks you meet at the sires are in "vacation" mode so are relaxed and easy going, no stress.

Overall there are very few downsides I feel, I have done the car / motel thing and had a great time (back in 1993) but it didnt compare to RV'ing.

The only 2 downsides I find are as my RV is always a very large Gas Class A, getting fuel is a task that requires great forward planning and military precision as so many stations are hard to get into, often for me to reach the back end where the filler is, the front end of the RV is now in the shop and parked next to the soda fountains.

Plus, as I rent I do not have a "toad" so smaller places are hard to visit, but hey, thats what my own two legs are for, walking, I enjoy it.

Texasrvers
Dem,

Two suggestions for your next trip.

Get a listing of the Flying J's, Loves, and Pilot's (and there are a few others). These are truck stops that have fuel lanes for just RV's. Because they cater to 18 wheelers their parking lots are usually much easier to get around in. Also these places usually have the best priced fuel in the area. We usually use Flying J because we have their discount card which is also good for their store items. Where we stop still takes a little planning, but it usually works out very well.

I'm sure you've thought of this one, but if you are going to be an area for a day or two you might consider renting a car. Sure beats having to unhook and drive the RV everywhere. I understand that can add quite a bit of expense to your trip, but then you'll save some on gas by not driving the RV. Just a thought.

We met several Brits on our last trip, but they were all on bus tours, so I'm assuming it wasn't you.

Glad you're enjoying your trips here. See you next year. In the meantime we'll be glad to help with any questions you have.
dementinator
QUOTE(Texasrvers @ Oct 16 2008, 11:23 AM) *

Dem,

Two suggestions for your next trip.

Get a listing of the Flying J's, Loves, and Pilot's (and there are a few others). These are truck stops that have fuel lanes for just RV's. Because they cater to 18 wheelers their parking lots are usually much easier to get around in. Also these places usually have the best priced fuel in the area. We usually use Flying J because we have their discount card which is also good for their store items. Where we stop still takes a little planning, but it usually works out very well.

I'm sure you've thought of this one, but if you are going to be an area for a day or two you might consider renting a car. Sure beats having to unhook and drive the RV everywhere. I understand that can add quite a bit of expense to your trip, but then you'll save some on gas by not driving the RV. Just a thought.

We met several Brits on our last trip, but they were all on bus tours, so I'm assuming it wasn't you.

Glad you're enjoying your trips here. See you next year. In the meantime we'll be glad to help with any questions you have.


Thanks for the heads up, I had wondered about flying Js as I wasnt sure if the truck plazas have Gas or Just diesel.

The Car rental had occured to me and the next time I stay at the Oasis in Vegas I may indeed hire a small car to tool around in.

I do have a question for all the Rvers out there...

Here in the UK and Europe, when a long vehicle, such as a truck or an RV passes you, we often flash the headlights once the rear of the passing vehicle has gotten clear, to let the driver know he can pull back in safely, do you guys do that in the US?

In all the years I have been driving over there I havent see it done.

Overall I must say I find driving in the US much more relaxing than in europe.
Lindsay Richards
We all have the same problems in getting fuel. You do get used it though, which probably doesnít happen to you in a rental. One thing that should help you out is the book Next Exit. It can be picked up at Camping World or many book stores. It tells you what is at each Express Way exit in the whole USA. We love it when we are on Expressways and you can usually scope out the better places to get fuel. We have gotten very good at making immediate decisions on getting fuel. If it doesnít look easy, we go on. We also try to never get down to where we have to fill up. We tend to use only the top half of the tank. We have found it is a lots more fun and scenic to try the back road. With confidence you can see a lots more and still feel secure in your driving. One thing that we really enjoy is eating at local places (mainly lunch). You can really get the flavor of an area by doing this and lunch is usually much cheaper. We like to go to the county seat and look for the men wearing suspenders (thatís the lawyers) and see where they eat. They will lead you right to the cheaper places with great food. People at thee places usually love to talk about their area and can give you great site seeing tips. Getting local knowledge about an area is the real trick of enjoying an RV vacation to the fullest.
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(dementinator @ Oct 16 2008, 02:41 PM) *

<snip>
I do have a question for all the Rvers out there...

Here in the UK and Europe, when a long vehicle, such as a truck or an RV passes you, we often flash the headlights once the rear of the passing vehicle has gotten clear, to let the driver know he can pull back in safely, do you guys do that in the US?

In all the years I have been driving over there I havent see it done.

Overall I must say I find driving in the US much more relaxing than in europe.


I do it, and I wish more did it when I pass.
Texasrvers
We flash our lights, too. Many times the passing vehicle responds by blinking their tail lights. We are so slow we never pass anyone so I don't know if they would flash their lights for us or not. We also pull over any time we safely can when we get cars backed up behind us. AND we always wave at oncoming RV's (unless it is a divided 4 lane highway). Only about a fourth wave back.

Sounds like Lin and Nancy sure have a great way of traveling. Like them we try to fill up when we get a little below half a tank. We also like to see the back country and eat at local cafes, too, but we just don't do it very much. Our problem is finding a place to park in the little towns, and we don't want to unhook the toad just to go to lunch. The next long trip we go on I am going to do what someone said (was it Lin?) and make it a point to stay in each place at least 2 nights and get to know the area. That sounds like a lot of fun.
DXSMac
QUOTE(dementinator @ Oct 16 2008, 08:50 AM) *

Theres a lot of things I love about RV'ing...
Plus, as I rent I do not have a "toad" so smaller places are hard to visit, but hey, thats what my own two legs are for, walking, I enjoy it.


DEMENTINATOR, I'm doing a blog on "Toadless RVing" (see my signature). If you find any good ideas to add to my blog, please let me know!

I sometimes rent a car from Enterprise, and I also carry a small scooter bike.

JJ
Lindsay Richards
QUOTE
Our problem is finding a place to park in the little towns, and we don't want to unhook the toad just to go to lunch



We have no problem unhooking in a parking lot for lunch and exploring. We have a Blue Ox tow bar with a Toad Stop braking system and it only takes a couple of minutes for unhooking and hooking back up. I can do this while my wife is primping. Many a time we have unhooked for lunch and seen such interesting stuff, we decided to spend the night or even two nights. This fits right in with our system of never making reservations.
Texasrvers
Lin, We still see unhooking for lunch as too much trouble even though we have an easy system. Guess we need to adopt your frame of mind.
Lindsay Richards
Setting up the braking system that utilizes the air ram that pushes on the brake peddle to me takes about as long as hooking up the tow bar. The Toad Stop and several others have everything under the hood of the toad and there is no hookup time. Thatís why we love it. There is a cable that comes thru the firewall and attaches to the back of the brake peddle and is never seen or felt when you are driving the toad. Takes about 2 minutes to hook and unhook.
dementinator
Some useful info there, thanks folks...

After 18 years of visiting and some 100,000 miles or so travelled I feel I know most of the road rules by now and possibly better than some locals! laugh.gif but its always nice to know new things, I didnt want to be flashing my lights to passing big rigs etc if it meant something altogether different than it does in Blighty.

Texasrvers
QUOTE(dementinator @ Oct 18 2008, 10:31 AM) *

After 18 years of visiting and some 100,000 miles or so travelled I feel I know most of the road rules by now and possibly better than some locals! laugh.gif but its always nice to know new things.


Good. So you have learned that we drive on the right side of the road. At least most of us do. laugh.gif laugh.gif
RLM
This year I visited a country that where one drives on the left side of the road. I made the remark to a local about driving on the wrong side of the road. His reply was ďwhen I visit the US I also have to drive on the wrong side of the road.Ē Funny.

With respect to the flashing lights issue, Iíd suggest some common sense. If a truck has other traffic behind it when passing you, then they probably appreciate knowing that they can move over quicker. If itís fairly wide open, then they donít need the hint.

We also like to do the mom and pop back roads restaurants. It might take a few extra minutes of looking around, but itís rare that we canít find a parking place somewhere close. Walking a few blocks has the added advantage of stretching the legs.

Besides, if you havenít gotten yourself into a place where you had to unhook to get out, then you havenít enjoyed one of the finer pleasures of RVing. smile.gif
bigredoes
Welcome

I have driven extensively in both the US and UK and my 'impression' is that the 'blinking of lights' is percieved differently in each country. Driving on the M-4 or any other road lights are blinked to 'get me out of the way' if I stay too long in the fast lane....if that was done here in the US most American drivers would take this blinking as rude and pushy and would probably respond with their own rudeness....in the UK I do not take it as such...I take it that I am the 'rude' one as I am 'in the way'.

Other times the blinking of lights is used is as a courtesy to let the other drive know that they may proceed and that I will wait..used primarily on narrower roads (think Cotswolds). Again here in the US this would probably not be 'understood'.

However, the one consistent use of blinking lights is the one you mention, I always blink my lights when someone is wanting to get back in my lane after passing me. Truck drivers always seem to do this; I always blink my lights to 'thank' the person that 'blinks' me in....

Now where can I rent a Caravan in the UK?? LOL


dementinator
QUOTE(bigredoes @ Oct 21 2008, 11:56 AM) *

Welcome

I have driven extensively in both the US and UK and my 'impression' is that the 'blinking of lights' is percieved differently in each country. Driving on the M-4 or any other road lights are blinked to 'get me out of the way' if I stay too long in the fast lane....if that was done here in the US most American drivers would take this blinking as rude and pushy and would probably respond with their own rudeness....in the UK I do not take it as such...I take it that I am the 'rude' one as I am 'in the way'.

Other times the blinking of lights is used is as a courtesy to let the other drive know that they may proceed and that I will wait..used primarily on narrower roads (think Cotswolds). Again here in the US this would probably not be 'understood'.

However, the one consistent use of blinking lights is the one you mention, I always blink my lights when someone is wanting to get back in my lane after passing me. Truck drivers always seem to do this; I always blink my lights to 'thank' the person that 'blinks' me in....

Now where can I rent a Caravan in the UK?? LOL


Ah the M4!! how about the M25 'parking lot' eh?

As far as lights being flashed because you are too slow and in the wrong lane, well it is kinda rude and typical of the standard of driving in the UK sometimes, plus its almost ALWAYS some idiot in a BMW who is being impatient.

Usually here in the UK, to thank a driver who has flashed us back in we alternate left and right flashers for a few seconds.

ALthough I love driving in the US the one thing that does kinda suprise me is the speed some of the trucks go, I usually travel in my RV at speeds between 60mph and 70 and they go by like I am in reverse and they hurtle past going downhill at speeds that would embarass the Starship Enterprise, now I am sorry but it doesnt matter how good a driver you are, an 80,000 pound plus truck travelling down a hill at over 80mph is NOT under control, you are merely going along for the ride and should there be any kind of trouble you will be making a very expensive visit into the scenery. Ours are all limited to 56mph, we have 45 ton trucks but they cannot use outside lanes of motorways and are limited to that speed, but too slow really, but damn its scary watching a huge truck barrelling past like that.

Plus, what are your laws regarding driving RVs? in the UK a standard car licence allows you to drive vehicles, commercial or otherwise up to 7.5 Tons, therefore all the RVs I have rented would require me to have a LGV (Large Goods Vehicle) licence first, new drivers are now limited to 3.5 tons in fact. The RVs I have hired are usually around 22,000 to 24,000 pounds but obviously no special requirements are needed, what about these even bigger 40 footers etc?

Rent a caravan in the UK. well motorhomes are often available, but these are much smaller than you would be used to, normally Ford Transit Van based (Bit like a Dodge Sprinter) etc, they will sleep 4 and do have some creature comforts but nothing like the US RVs, however that will return about 30mpg on Diesel so its not all bad.

Thanks for the welcome everyone, typical good American hospitality!
Texasrvers
I'm not sure as to when you actually need a commercial license here. At the same time I am not aware of any special license you need to drive an RV regardless of type or length. When we bought our first big class A we were handed the keys, and the seller said "Have fun." (In all fairness this was a private individual, not a dealership.) But we still didn't have to take a driving course or pass a test or anything. And we're not so sure that is a good idea. I know I will probably take some hits on this one, but I don't think it would be a bad thing to require some kind of a driving course for RVs over a certain length. We could all stand a little more safety on the highways.

As for 18 wheelers--time is money for them. They need to deliver their load asap so that they can pick up the next one. This certainly doesn't give them the right to be dangerous, but it does cause them to push it to the limit. Fortunately truck speeds are sometimes less than cars, and there are some highways that don't allow trucks in the far left lane. They do tend to go very fast downhill so that they can get a good run at the uphill. If you want some real fun the next time you're here try driving on I-35. It is one of the main corridors out of Mexico, and it is wall-to-wall trucks. We hate to drive on it even in a car.

RVing in the UK. Hhmmmm, something to think about.
dementinator
It cant be easy for truckers at times I must admit, over here we have a different problem, We have one huge 45 tonner following another on the motorway, truck one is going 55Mph, truck two behind wants to overtake, so out he pulls into lane 2... he accelerates up to a nice 56mph where he hits the limiter, so we now have two side by side big rigs that take about 40 miles for one to overtake the other, two thirds of the motorway is now blocked, Lane 3 is usually occupied by hurtling Beamers and Ford Mondeos so its hard to get into that one too.

When I return my rented RV I usually like to have a potter round the workshops and look at the repairs going on, the amount of damaged units is amazing, the guy told me it can be as much as 1 in 3 that are damaged in some way upon return, seems folks can have few ideas about handling such a large vehicle, some class 'C's aer now in excess of 30ft and many European renters have never driven anyhting more than a small hatcback.

Fortunately we have horses so I often drive a large horse transport truck so have some experience, but it seems the long rear overhang catches many out on tight turns, also a lot seem to forget to take corners much wider,yes the back will follow the front, but if you take the right hand corner at an intersection too tightly it will follow it up the sidewalk, over the people waiting for the bus, up over the parked cars and possibly through the convience store.

So you are correct, maybe a small driving course for folks not familiar with what is essentially a large bus.

John Blue
dementinator,

We spent couple weeks in the UK some years ago and I will say this. Your drivers are 10 times better on the road ways than ones here in the colonials. Main roads have speed limit signs that change as problems come up down the road. The round-a-bouts are the best thing we have ever found anyplace on earth. Everyone moves and no one needs to slow down or stop anyplace. Road speed is under control due to photo tag, if you drive to fast your speeding ticket will be sent by mail to you with a note to have a nice day.

In our two weeks we found one truck that had a turn over problem. No car wrecks in our travels over England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Here at home we see cars wrecks any time we go anyplace. Shops here are full of car wrecks all the time. People in the UK were great to be around and love to drink beer and ale.

Each time I see an 80,000 lbs truck running down hill on I-70 east at speeds of a race car, I think next time we see him will be in a pile of junk on side of the road. No prizes for first one down the mountain.

We hope you enjoy the states as much as we enjoyed the UK. We hope to return back to London before to long. We need to spend more time on tour and see more places.
dementinator
QUOTE(John Blue @ Oct 22 2008, 11:24 AM) *

dementinator,

We spent couple weeks in the UK some years ago and I will say this. Your drivers are 10 times better on the road ways than ones here in the colonials. Main roads have speed limit signs that change as problems come up down the road. The round-a-bouts are the best thing we have ever found anyplace on earth. Everyone moves and no one needs to slow down or stop anyplace. Road speed is under control due to photo tag, if you drive to fast your speeding ticket will be sent by mail to you with a note to have a nice day.

In our two weeks we found one truck that had a turn over problem. No car wrecks in our travels over England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Here at home we see cars wrecks any time we go anyplace. Shops here are full of car wrecks all the time. People in the UK were great to be around and love to drink beer and ale.

Each time I see an 80,000 lbs truck running down hill on I-70 east at speeds of a race car, I think next time we see him will be in a pile of junk on side of the road. No prizes for first one down the mountain.

We hope you enjoy the states as much as we enjoyed the UK. We hope to return back to London before to long. We need to spend more time on tour and see more places.


Glad you enjoyed the UK, next time you are here visit my home county of Herefordshire, yes thats where the Hereford Cattle come from and its a really nice part of the country near the Welsh border.

I guess all countries have their problems driving around, Italy is supposed to be real fun.

DXSMac
QUOTE(dementinator @ Oct 22 2008, 09:57 AM) *

When I return my rented RV I usually like to have a potter round the workshops and look at the repairs going on, the amount of damaged units is amazing, the guy told me it can be as much as 1 in 3 that are damaged in some way upon return, seems folks can have few ideas about handling such a large vehicle, some class 'C's aer now in excess of 30ft and many European renters have never driven anyhting more than a small hatcback.


If you are familiar with the "Redneck Comedians," I like Jeff Foxworthy's routine on rental cars.

"Do you want the additional insurance Mr. Foxworthy?"

"Yes I DO!!! I have seen what people DO with rental cars! My grandmother, who won't drive more than 35 miles per hour, DOES DONUTS with rental cars!"

I hope people don't take that attitude with RV's...... That's too big a vehicle to take the "rental car" attitude.....

JJ
Texasrvers
QUOTE
we now have two side by side big rigs that take about 40 miles for one to overtake the other, two thirds of the motorway is now blocked, Lane 3 is usually occupied by hurtling Beamers and Ford Mondeos so its hard to get into that one too.


That is not something exclusive to your area of the world. We have that same problem here except there are usually only 2 lanes, not 3, so there is no chance of getting by.



QUOTE
it seems the long rear overhang catches many out on tight turns, also a lot seem to forget to take corners much wider,


Oh yes, we've all done this. There's a gas pump in Roswell, New Mexico, that will never be the same after our visit. This happened on one of our first trips driving the big rig, and we did not swing wide enough for the tow car to get past the pump. That was the first time we had to unhook. Now there have been 2 more. You would think we would learn!
bigredoes
Indeed the M-25 is a parking lot !! Our usual trip lands us at Heathrow - then express train into Paddington Station. Two or three days in London - then back to Heathrow to rent a car (not sure I am ready to drive IN London) - and then we head out to some part of the country.. JohnBlue - check out Cornwall and The Lakes District and Kent and ....oh heck.....just go anywhere it is ALL good.

Dementinator we have probably 'circled' your farm (here you would be a ranch...lol) Driven up from Bristol to Llandrindon Wells then on to Shrewsbury and also a stop a Great Malvern (for a dog show) - it is indeed very nice country.

Our experience with drivers in the UK is that they totally ignored the posted speed limits...have the cameras slowed people down? I like the idea of separate lanes for lorries but am not fond of separate speed limits - that seems to bottle up traffic especially on two lane interstates.

I also do not have any knowledge of a separate license - we drive a 40 ft motorhome and like Texasrver we were handed the keys....Texas how bad is I-35? we have driven as far south as San Antonio but this winter we are heading to Mission Tx - any advice?

So Dementinator - Wolves fan?
Texasrvers
bigredoes,

If you have driven on I-35 as far as San Antonio you have been on the worst part (in my opinion) which is between San Antonio and Dallas. It's just that there are a lot of 18-wheelers and all the problems that they bring. Also there always seems to be construction on some part, but I'm not sure where they are working right now. And actually if you are heading to Mission from San Antonio you will get off I-35. You will take I-37 out of SA and then get on Highway 281 the rest of the way. I-35 goes to Laredo from San Antonio, and Mission is much farther south in the Texas valley (southern tip of Texas).

You should do fine, but if you are concerned there are two alternate routes that a lot of RVers take. You can switch over to Hwy 281 somewhere south of the Texas/Okla. border. It is to the west of I-35 and actually runs way up into Kansas or Nebraska. It goes through SA and then on down to the valley. OR you can take Hwy 77 out of Waco. It is to the east of I-35, goes to near Corpus Christi and eventually winds up in the valley also. Both roads are good and are 4 lane undivided in many places, but they do go through many little towns with stop lights.

Hope you enjoy your stay here, and let me know if you need more info.

TX
dementinator
Theres something about driving through Salt Lake City that I never enjoy, the outside area seems to start somewhere in south Montana and finish 80 miles south of Vegas, ok I am perhaps exagerating somewhat there but boy oh boy it goes on and on, intersection after intersection, freeway after freeway, traffic hurtling in from all directions and never ending construction.

I remember back in 95 driving north through there in a Southwind Storm, the ones on the old Chevy Chassis, you know, where the wheels were located about 2 feet inside the outer body work, so if you took you hand of the wheel for even a nano second you got up close and personal with nature. Well I got to about 40 miles from SLC and the dreaded Concrete dividers started, the RV had a width of 102" and the nice construction people had given us a huge 104" of space between them, so there I was, clinging to the wheel, mirrors over hanging the dividers on both sides trying to keep the thing from bouncing all over and not holding up traffic, this went on for 30 odd miles and I was a wreck by the time I emerged at the other end, several pounds lighter and with a strange facial tick.

Hence I seem to always dread that part of the I 15, they seem to know I am comming and up go the dividers, fortuantely the modern RV handles so much better now and even stops when asked to, god that old P30 Chassis was frightening at times.
FosterImposters
Man does this bring back memories. Seems there is ALWAYS wind in the mixture as well.
Last time thru this gauntlet was not as bad for us. Perhaps knowing what's in store...and we're now pulling a tow-car...tail of a kite effect...ha! laugh.gif
My nemesis is 1-15 dropping down out of St. George, Utah into Nevada. Mr. Toad's WILD RIDE... ohmy.gif
dementinator
QUOTE(bigredoes @ Oct 22 2008, 12:43 PM) *

Indeed the M-25 is a parking lot !! Our usual trip lands us at Heathrow - then express train into Paddington Station. Two or three days in London - then back to Heathrow to rent a car (not sure I am ready to drive IN London) - and then we head out to some part of the country.. JohnBlue - check out Cornwall and The Lakes District and Kent and ....oh heck.....just go anywhere it is ALL good.

Dementinator we have probably 'circled' your farm (here you would be a ranch...lol) Driven up from Bristol to Llandrindon Wells then on to Shrewsbury and also a stop a Great Malvern (for a dog show) - it is indeed very nice country.

Our experience with drivers in the UK is that they totally ignored the posted speed limits...have the cameras slowed people down? I like the idea of separate lanes for lorries but am not fond of separate speed limits - that seems to bottle up traffic especially on two lane interstates.

I also do not have any knowledge of a separate license - we drive a 40 ft motorhome and like Texasrver we were handed the keys....Texas how bad is I-35? we have driven as far south as San Antonio but this winter we are heading to Mission Tx - any advice?

So Dementinator - Wolves fan?


Ah the Wolverhampton Wanderers eh? How in the name of all thats holy did you find yourself in that area? not exactly a tourist destination hehe.

To be honest, unusual as it may seem I am not really a huge soccer fan, if I do support anyone its my home town 'Hereford United' but I am more into tennis really, hence my forum name, I am a fan of a Russian Female player called Elena Dementieva.

I was just thinking how the modern RV has changed so much, even just in the last 10 years or so, they now handle so much better and even stop, I can remember having to call 40 miles ahead to see what the traffic lights were doing so I could start slowing down in readiness and the steering used to be done by committee its seemed, now things are way better indeed.

We used to have an old Tiffin Allegro 30ft Class A back home in the UK, a 1989 model we picked up cheap at a local auction, it was fitted with a Chevvy 6.2 non turbo Diesel, dear god that thing was slow, it didnt have a speedometer but a Theodolite to check if there was any forward progress taking place and hills were to be feared and avoided.

Nowadays you can zoom along at 70mph in near silence, a much better deal.

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