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Farmerswife


Has anyone else experienced rude behavior at Canadian border crossings? We took a 3 month trip to Alaska summer of 2009 and crossed the Canadian border a total of 5 times. We found some of the staff (Canadian) to be---well---condescending and snappish. I got the impression some would have preferred we'd stayed in the US. We answered all questions politely, had proper documentation and papers for our dogs (which no one was interested in seeing anyhow.)
Just wondering if we were too sensitive.
pianotuna
Hi,

I guess it happens the other way too! I once crossed into USA from Manitoba. I was "invited" to sit in hot sun for 45 minutes while they went through my RV with a fine toothed comb.

When I asked if I might move into the air conditioned office, I got a flat out "NO".

It is the only time this has happened.
John Blue
Same thing happen three months ago at I-5. As we crossed into US the border guard ask me "well what is your story". I had our US passport in hand and he could see them. We are seniors. I told him we had come off a cruise ship in Vancouver and our plans were to drive down into WA and OR for one week and then return back to Vancouver to fly back home. I could see by look on this face we were nut cases. Long lines on each side of border and may have been part of the problem.

On return back up I-5 on Canadian side the young border guard ask what was our plans to visit Canada. We told him about the ship and returning back home. He ask did we have a good time in states, yes. Told wife and I to enjoy our time in Canada and we were off to Vancouver. He was a nice person!

We did see the US border people looking into all non US cars and equipment. As soon as I showed our passports he routed our car into a different line. At that point we had our experience with our unhappy guard.
Tom
We just went to Niagara Falls last month, stayed on the Canadian side. No problems crossing border. I guess the Canadian guard was a little "cool", but not rude at all, just business like and efficient.

I had never crossed a border "on the ground" (only by plane in the past), so I read up a little about it. We kept necessary paperwork organized and at hand if needed (at least, we thought!), had our passports with us (my understanding is that it is now necessary to have a passport to cross the Canada/US border?). We only answered the border guards questions, only used "yes" or "no" if that was appropriate, and didn't try to make "small talk".

Speaking of paperwork, when the Canadian guard asked for our truck's license plate number, we could't find the registration for the truck (!). No problem, though, being as the truck was less than a year old, the registration was a card, not a sheet of paper - we eventually did find it. I hadn't gotten the truck and trailer registration out of the folder in the glove compartment where I always keep it to check on it because I knew it was there... next time I will get it out just to double check!

We don't cross the border regularly, so it was all new and interesting for us.
Farmerswife
I am basing my question on some very negative experiences:

Pulled up to the border from Alaska into B.C. and no one was at the window. We remained at the window for 10 minutes--could see activity in the office. Then a very unpleasant woman came to the window, looked annoyed and asked us for our documentation, all the questions (guns, bear spray, etc.) and then wordlessly nodded to move on.

Later that day in B.C. we encountered a roadblock. When we reached the front of the line a conservation warden asked if we had any fish or wildlife with us. We said "Salmon from AK in our freezer." He then directed us into a truck weigh station which was mostly crowded with enormous logging trucks. Very little direction. Saw a guy waving and we pulled up. He was polite but inquired about fish and game. We said, again, salmon in our freezer we caught in Alaska. He asked for proof it was caught in Alaska and indicated he might want to enter and see it. We happened to have--quite by accident--our temporary AK fishing licenses--he needed to see both! He said that was satisfactory proof and waved us out. The whole experience took
45 minutes. No one had ever suggested we keep our expired licenses, and how that piece of paper proved anything I have no idea. Nor do I understand how his looking at frozen zip lock bags with salmon fillets would have demonstrated that we weren't poachers?

An RV'er next to us in an AK park told us that she was asked the question about guns, of course. And then she was asked if she had any guns "at home." Can't verify for her, but ?????

Cheryl
Just came back from 1000 Islands, NY area. Saw various signs directing Canadian residents to go to immigration and show proof of residency when docking a boat. No way for anybody to really enforce that. I'm sure it is the same on the Canadian side. You can rent a boat, zip across the St. Lawrence Seaway, and be in a foreign country with no passport and who is going to know?
winnebago99
There are jerks in uniform on both sides of the border and this minority influences peoples opinions about all of the customs/border officials.
We recently came back from a two week trip into Canada and frankly felt the professionalism and simple courtesy of the Canadian border people to be lacking. We were well aware of the border regulations, had all our documents including passports, and answered all of the questions they asked. It seems that if you are crossing into Canada from a state that's not your home state then apparently you become suspect of something. Add to that having the misfortune to list your occupation as self-employed and apparently the threat level rises to red. I have been in and out of Canada many times and never had to deal with some rude and frankly outrageous questions. In what possible way is it relevant if I own a gun when I already answered I had none in my possession? I don't know if it's the post 9/11 environment or just the luck of the draw but my recent experience convinces I don't want to go back.
danny5002
What a hoot!! I thought I was the only one that had problems at the Canadian/U.S. border. I'm a gringo but the people that gave me the most problems were other gringos. We thought staying on the Canandian side of Niagara would be fun and different. Different yes, fun no. The Canadians were pretty nice and consistant. The U.S. border people were rude and had a constantly changing interpretation of the rules. We walked accross one day and the US guy said "do you have any contraband"? Now to me "contraband" is something illegal or not permissable. I said "no just t-shirts and souveniers. He said "oh we don't care about that kind of stuff". Done deal. Came to the US one day and was met by a guard with his campain hat pulled down over his eyes and wearing a half-glove on one hand. That should have been a warning to me. He didn't like one of my political signs and started grilling me as to wheather I was a veteran or not. By the way the political sign had nothing to do with war, veterans or anything he was pursuing. I told him as a matter of fact I was. He went back to the back of the truck to check the plate comparing our registration. I expected him to throw a gun on us at anytime. One other time we pulled into the path and had to wait for the female guard to finish her argument with the guard next door before she could let us through. THEN, when we were leaving the country we pulled in one of the check points and a guard asked "do you have any contraband"? I knew the answser to that now. I said no, just souveniers. He began raising his voice and explained to me "that IS contraband". Crap,, and all the time I thought i had figured out the answer to one of the questions. We won't be staying on the Canadian side again. Walking accross is a lot easier.
Lindsay Richards
We left Florida about 3 weeks ago and are now in Travares City, MI and considering going up into Canada. I surely don't need any hassles in my life. I will probably just go West after crossing the bridge. It is very cold up here and is down into the 40's at night. I guess I missed the two weeks of summer.
Butch

We are currently on Prince Edward Island in Canada, and will be leaving PEI for New Brunswick tomorrow and will be making a border crossing at St. Stephens, NB and Calais, Maine. Our crossing into Canada at the same crossing point was not uneventful, they, Canadian Border Guards checked our motorhome and our tow vehicle and held us up about 45 minutes to an hour. Now I would like to know what in heck are they looking for !!! We have the new "enhanced" drive licenses and do not need passports. Had all important paperwork, and was very aware of the Canadian rules governing entrance, but were still held for an inspection. Myself at 70 years old and my wife in her 60's, I repeat, what could they be looking for ???? I guess we look guilty or something. As we will be crossing back into our own country tomorrow.....this should be an enlightening experience. This same thing happened a few years back and vowed to never cross out of the USA again. But we wanted to go to PEI, and we are certainly not getting any younger, so this was the year.... Will give an update on the crossing into the USA........ great fun......
Lindsay Richards
We are in Sault Ste. Marie now and will be taking the toad into Canada tomorrow. I will report what happens.
pianotuna
Hi Lindsay,

Welcome to Canada! By the way does a "Lindsay Pole" qualify as a deadly weapon? *grin*

QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Aug 31 2009, 07:32 PM) *

We are in Sault Ste. Marie now and will be taking the toad into Canada tomorrow. I will report what happens.
wprigge
Yes, welcome to Canada Lindsay! Hope you have a great time, and don't forget to end all your sentences with "eh?"....
;-)
Lindsay Richards
We actually strayed into Canada yesterday when we took the Lock Tour. Very nice. I am taking the big boat tour down from the Lock tour site in a few minutes. The wife isn't coming. One of of my Lindsay Pole ued to qualify as a deadly weapon, but now is only a cncealed weapon. EH
Bobby Will
We crossed over into Canada a few weeks ago and I was surprised at the cool, almost rude, behavior of the border guard. He asked us three times if we were carrying a gun just because we were from Texas. That was his reason for asking. Each time we answered no. Then he spouted some comment about there being over 2300 gun shops in Texas (have no idea where he got that number) and then asked us again. I very nearly gave him a lecture on American constitutional law but didn't.

The Border Patrol guard when we crossed back was just the nicest young man you could meet. We were done in less than five minutes.
Lindsay Richards
Our boarder guard was very nice and gave us no problems. Hedid ask me if I had a "sidearm". I told him yes, but we left it back at the campground (We went in the toad.). We are going back tomorrow for the train ride which should be very nice. People in Canada couldn't be nicer to us.
Lindsay Richards
We went across today and they were very nice.
RLM
There are obvious restrictions for border crossings. Guns would be one. Not so obvious are food and plants. As an example, if the meat in your freezer isnít wrapped in the original container that validates it was US store bought; it may be subject to confiscation. There are some fresh vegetables that may not make it past the crossing. Potatoes and corn are two. House plants are subject on a case by case basis. Thereís a limit on alcohol and tobacco products. All of these issues affect those RVers because a stocked rig is something we tend to take for granted. So do the research. It changes daily.

Canadian/US border crossing are not the time for chit-chat. Iíve found that having your documents ready and respond to questions with short, impersonal answers seem to work best. Like Tom, I favor yes or no.
2beagles
We crossed into Quebec and back at Derby Line Vermont a couple of weeks ago and had zero problems. The border guards on both sides were business like and wasted no time at all. The Canadian guards asked about firearms, firewood, animals, etc., and the American guard a week later just asked our home town, occupations, places traveled, and if we had any goods to declare, and we were on our way.
Very efficient.
We did find out from the other four families in our group who crossed at different times and places that the proceedures were very different each time.
JRBI
QUOTE(Farmerswife @ Aug 22 2009, 09:12 PM) *

Has anyone else experienced rude behavior at Canadian border crossings? We took a 3 month trip to Alaska summer of 2009 and crossed the Canadian border a total of 5 times. We found some of the staff (Canadian) to be---well---condescending and snappish. I got the impression some would have preferred we'd stayed in the US. We answered all questions politely, had proper documentation and papers for our dogs (which no one was interested in seeing anyhow.)
Just wondering if we were too sensitive.

No, you weren't too sensitive. I've been crossing the borders for 10 years and basically it boils down to luck of the draw. I've found the US side has gotten better in some cases but many times I've experienced some of the most rude behavior from the Canadian side. It's just hit and miss I guess. I live in Canada due to my wife being Canadian and I can tell you there were times when I would be crossing back into Canada that I would have just have said to hell with them and went back on the US side. While I've never been searched, I've encountered long delays. I know this may sound cliche, but they want our money but would prefer we not come up. As a permanent resident now, I usually (highlight usually) experience less difficulty. But, you always run into that one person who wants to exert his authority and it's usually some 20 year old who doesn't have a clue how to handle people.
Butch
QUOTE(Butch @ Aug 30 2009, 08:24 PM) *

We are currently on Prince Edward Island in Canada, and will be leaving PEI for New Brunswick tomorrow and will be making a border crossing at St. Stephens, NB and Calais, Maine. Our crossing into Canada at the same crossing point was not uneventful, they, Canadian Border Guards checked our motorhome and our tow vehicle and held us up about 45 minutes to an hour. Now I would like to know what in heck are they looking for !!! We have the new "enhanced" drive licenses and do not need passports. Had all important paperwork, and was very aware of the Canadian rules governing entrance, but were still held for an inspection. Myself at 70 years old and my wife in her 60's, I repeat, what could they be looking for ???? I guess we look guilty or something. As we will be crossing back into our own country tomorrow.....this should be an enlightening experience. This same thing happened a few years back and vowed to never cross out of the USA again. But we wanted to go to PEI, and we are certainly not getting any younger, so this was the year.... Will give an update on the crossing into the USA........ great fun......


If anyone gives a hoot, We did cross back into the USA at Calais Maine on Aug. 31st and the USA Border Officer was very professional and polite. A few questions, asked to come aboard the RV, checked refrigerator for citrus, checked one closet, and stated, "okay to go, have a nice vacation". Was very interested in our NYS "enhanced" driver licences, gave us the impression he had not seen one before, but he did know exactly what they are...........off we went to finish our vacation on the Maine Coast at Acadia Park area, our favorite spot............
Bearii
For years I traveled for business to Canada via plane. The airport customs tend to be much tougher than the border guards I've had when crossing by car. As someone who has traveled worldwide and has dealt with truly difficult border crossings (such as the old USSR) the Canadians are a pleasure to work with. I find that most people say WAAAAYYY too much to the border guard. When you are crossing answer ONLY the question they ask, do not elaborate, do not explain, answer YES/NO or the briefest answer possible. They really, really do not care about your grandkids or your fishing trip or your new rigs refrigerator, etc., etc. Always, always, always be extremely polite and respectful.

I married a Canadian 3 years ago and until we started crossing together she would often get stopped and inspected. During our first crossing I told her I would handle everything and not to say a word. She did tried to interrupt and "explain" things to the guard when he asked certain questions. With a smile to the guard I cut her off. She was shocked that instead of reacting he waved us through. Now I always handle all the crossing for us and we've never been inpected or held up. My record of dozens of border crossings with no inspections over two decades remains unblemished to date (knock on wood).
Farmerswife
Interesting to read all the border crossing vignettes since I posted in August after having some unpleasant Canadian border guards at different locations. Just for the record, we didn't talk too much, had our paperwork ready and were respectful. I know there's bigshot types everywhere who like to act up when in uniform. Just reporting to the RV community that there were several negative experiences without provocation, leading me to presume there has been an attitude change.

We met several German families while travelling and the consistent message there was they were relieved we had a new president.

Seems to me we have some baggage to pay for for the past several years. I think our national image has been harmed and it is showing up in dribs and drabs in other places. I, for one, will not assume again that other countries are thrilled with the Americans.

Note: Not asking for a firestorm of political comment. Just wanting to post my conclusions.
Butch
QUOTE(Bearii @ Sep 14 2009, 11:34 PM) *

For years I traveled for business to Canada via plane. The airport customs tend to be much tougher than the border guards I've had when crossing by car. As someone who has traveled worldwide and has dealt with truly difficult border crossings (such as the old USSR) the Canadians are a pleasure to work with. I find that most people say WAAAAYYY too much to the border guard. When you are crossing answer ONLY the question they ask, do not elaborate, do not explain, answer YES/NO or the briefest answer possible. They really, really do not care about your grandkids or your fishing trip or your new rigs refrigerator, etc., etc. Always, always, always be extremely polite and respectful.

I married a Canadian 3 years ago and until we started crossing together she would often get stopped and inspected. During our first crossing I told her I would handle everything and not to say a word. She did tried to interrupt and "explain" things to the guard when he asked certain questions. With a smile to the guard I cut her off. She was shocked that instead of reacting he waved us through. Now I always handle all the crossing for us and we've never been inpected or held up. My record of dozens of border crossings with no inspections over two decades remains unblemished to date (knock on wood).


Have crossed the Canadian border twice in the last fifteen years and have had an inspection both times by Candian Border Officers.........must have a guilty look or something. More than likely will not cross again for another fifteen years because of the treatment as in relation to inspections....
dhfinc
dry.gif My wife and I just went across the border at Niagara and the young man after detemining that I was a gun owner ask a series of bizare questions about why I owned a hand gun. This was after we determined that my guns were 800 miles away in my gun safe. We we were then treated to a search of our vehicle incuding sniffing our water bottles. I woudn't say that they were rude a very unusual conversation. The border people on the US side returning were short and to the point but just scanned our passports and sent us on our way.
Farmerswife
QUOTE(dhfinc @ Sep 16 2009, 11:06 AM) *

dry.gif My wife and I just went across the border at Niagara and the young man after detemining that I was a gun owner ask a series of bizare questions about why I owned a hand gun. This was after we determined that my guns were 800 miles away in my gun safe. We we were then treated to a search of our vehicle incuding sniffing our water bottles. I woudn't say that they were rude a very unusual conversation. The border people on the US side returning were short and to the point but just scanned our passports and sent us on our way.


I truly object to questions about my personal choices in my country. "Why I own a handgun" would be an example of inappropriate questioning in my book. You are not the first person to report this, as I noted. WHAT IS GOING ON?????
MeXicalliannie
Hello all,
we have been crossing the American/Canadian border for over 38 years and have never in all that time ever had a bad experience. Whether it is to cross the US border just for the day or in the last few years for months at a time..whether it be in our car or pulling our 5th wheel.
It IS a serious and dangerous world we live in these days. Terrorists aside we must protect the border on both sides.

It is hard to see these things when in general we are the honest ones. The guards in mostly are good but some ...give them a uniform and any authority and it goes to their heads. Whether it is in their character to be in a bad mood everyday or just because of that particular day. When someone gets across and causes a problem or threat to either side then what do we have to say?

On the Canadian defense...since I am and can only voice for us. Yes we are gun free here. It does creep me out to know how many actually carry in the US. Guards ask questions in a border crossing conversation several times to see if they can trip you up. Age doesn't have anything to do with the questions ...there are some elders that are dishonest too ya know!

In general I feel that when you cross back to your own side it is always a more pleasant experience.
I sincerely hope a bad experience at the border won't stop Americans from visiting our beautiful country and vice versa.

Happy Trails
[size=3]
KDMDTN
We were in a Class C RV and crossed from Montana into Alberta at Sweet Grass recently on May 20 and the questions were brief and most reasonable. There was no delay for us but we did not use the truck line.
Last June there were many more questions asked of us when we crossed into Canada at Rainbow Bridge at Niagara Falls.
Glenn Norton
The trouble with crossing the Canada USA border is there is no consistency with the way the border agents handle their job. Most agents are business like and efficient and I usually am on my way quickly, but there are some agents out there who surely got out of the wrong side of the bed and take it out on poor us. My worst scenario was when border agents on the Canada side were giving on the job training to a new agent recruit and held us up for 45 minutes. The most annoying thing seems to be when department of agriculture agents on the US side take our fruit or cat food. Don't take the labels off any fruit prior to crossing the border. As far as the gun issue, that's a pretty touchy subject in Canada still. I have talked to Canadian customs agents who have siezed handguns from Americans. However, that agent who commented on the number of gun shops in Texas was out of line. My last experience was in Montana where the lady agent was efficient and cheerful, even when she took my apples! rolleyes.gif
Mike F
We just got back about a week ago. We crossed twice; Once in Surrey BC and again at Anacortes going to Victoria,via the car ferry. Both times, the Canadian agents went completely through our motorhome, taking about an hour. One guard did find a bottle of Sheridans, we forgot to claim. He left us keep it and told us he could have had us pay a $60 duty charge, but gave us a warning. Both US agents, all but waved us through. So much for US border security.

All the guards we encountered were friendly.
karatekid
ok i will try to keep this short but i get long winded

in 2008 we were traveling cross country (texas) to visit family in nova scotia. keep in mind we have only lived in texas 6 months or so st this point. so when we were crossing in to canada agents were nice and friendly. i offered to open all compartments at will to try and help out they searched and searched and searched. and while searching i was asked about 6 times if i had any weapons. everytime i told them no!! so finally as we were just about done i asked do ya'll have a problem with guns ??? you seem pretty worried about that. his comment was well your from texas - everybody from texas has guns!!!! oookkkk just a little profiling are we???

so as i was getting in my truck to leave - i told him well if it is any consolation, i am not originally from texas lol.
Glenn Norton
I just got back into Canada and the customs agent seemed more interested if I was bringing back cigarettes or booze than anything else. Didn't ask me about our cat or what food we brought back with us. She did ask me for my plate number so i would hazard that customs knew exactly how many days we had been down in the States. In any case it didn't take more than a few minutes to get through customs. I extend my heartfelt sympathy to all you Texans out there. To be profiled as armed to the teeth is a bit much. I heard that some counties in Georgia almost demand you possess a gun to maintain a residence. Oops, now customs will pick on you too! biggrin.gif
jim crowl
I've crossed a number of times, without issue. Most of the customs agents have been nice; overall I've found the Canadian ones a bit more polite than the U.S. agents (and I'm from USA). I was only inspected once, returning to the U.S., and the person seemed most interested in my refrigerator. One of the questions was if I had any meats. I was thinking of steaks, hamburger etc and said no. A couple minutes later I heard a yell "what the hell is this?" and went back to see what he meant. He was swinging a half package of salami in the air. I apologized and then told him actually it was bought in the U.S.A. He asked if I could prove it, then apologized himself, and said "oh that's okay, I see it says Spokane WA right on the label" and ended the inspection. So save your lunch meat receipts too! Other than that I have not had any problems.
DXSMac
QUOTE(Glenn Norton @ Jun 25 2010, 08:03 PM) *

I heard that some counties in Georgia almost demand you possess a gun to maintain a residence. Oops, now customs will pick on you too! biggrin.gif



Counties? It's TOWNS! When I lived in Georgia (1980's-1990's) the city of Kennesaw passed an ordinance REQUIRING all households to have a gun.

JJ
jamarynn1
Crossing back into the US from Vancouver to Washington after the Olympics in February, we were asked if we had any fruit. My sister answered "just some apples and oranges which I brought from Washington". The agent then promptly took our passports, directed us to a parking area and told us to leave "everything" in the camper and go into the building. We sat there for about 30 minutes, then were sternly but politely lectured that the apples were OK because they had the country of origin stickers on them, but that the oranges were definitely NOT OK, NOT OK AT ALL. We were obviously undermining the entire welfare of the agricultural business on the West Coast by repatriating undocumented American oranges to their homeland. At that point, I was nervous enough to have probably confessed to knowing where Jimmy Hoffa was buried, but we apparantly looked chastened and sorry enough, so we were allowed to go slink down the highway, minus the offending oranges and a package of sausage in the freezer that was missing a label. The interesting part was that when we got back to Seattle, there was still an orange in the refrig. I was looking over my shoulder for a week, waiting for the Feds to come for me....haha.....I haven't been able to pick up an orange in the grocery store since without breaking out in a sweat.
DG Miller
We have had very pleasant experiences crossing the border in the last 30 years except for a couple of incidents, one my error. Anyway, recently we are starting to question whether we want to cross into the US. Customs isn't our problem. They are friendly, ask the questions, try to trip us up, but when you are honest, no problem.
Then we get to "pull over and let the Ag officers check out your rig". We know not to bring fruit to the US and don't. We know not to bring dog food in, but try anyway. Potatoes were another item. They had a bit of "scabies?" on them so couldn't be commercial!!!??? The ones I bought in WA to replace the confiscated ones were worse than the Canadian ones. The AG agent acted like a real know-it-all and then decided after lecturing us that she should pet our dog for 5 minutes before letting us go on our way. Lady ... we don't care if you like our dog, especially after taking the dog food away and the potatoes, and lecturing us! smile.gif tongue.gif
I find Customs does their job. Agricultural agents seem to need a reason to be there. We actually had 2 agents in our trailer this last time(21 feet) one being about 350 lbs. How they moved around in there I don't know!? smile.gif
sueinbc
QUOTE(jamarynn1 @ Jul 21 2010, 01:27 AM) *

Crossing back into the US from Vancouver to Washington after the Olympics in February, we were asked if we had any fruit...... but that the oranges were definitely NOT OK, NOT OK AT ALL. We were obviously undermining the entire welfare of the agricultural business on the West Coast by repatriating undocumented American oranges to their homeland. At that point, I was nervous enough to have probably confessed to knowing where Jimmy Hoffa was buried, but we apparantly looked chastened and sorry enough, so we were allowed to go slink down the highway, minus the offending oranges


Thanks for the big laugh over your orange story! We frequently cross the border as we camp in Washington state a lot. Years ago on one trip I had plucked some plums out of our kids uneaten lunchbags and put them in the trailer fridge so they wouldn't go bad while we were away for spring break. A very big NO NO! I was lectured and I very politely answered, "yes, sir, no sir, I was very ignorant, sir" in hopes of avoiding the $50 fine that the people in the line ahead of me had to pay. Luckily, he accepted my meek apologies and I left with a written warning. Meanwhile, my husband was chatting with the US border guard while I was inside being grilled. He learned that the agirculture folks had not been brought to the table when the first 'fast-pass' program was worked out between the US and Canada. The agriculture guys reacted by being overly strict. My own family branded me a plum-smuggler! blink.gif Since then we never take any food product (except staples like spices, flour, sugar) across and buy fresh when we get to the US side.

Since we are frequent border crossers, we have signed up for the Nexus program and that generally cuts down on the questions and the time spent in crossing. However, there will always be the occasional overly officious/cranky guard both sides.

As a Canadian, I would hope that all Americans would feel welcome here and enjoy their visit despite their border crossing experience!
peta
I was born in England, grew up in Canada and have lived in the States for about 45 years. I'm married to an American. We have crossed borders all over the place. We have crossed in Alaska, Mexico, numerous east and west coast ports of entry. It's taken and hour on occasion and 5 min. on others. It doesn't matter where you're from or which way you're going!
Border guards are overworked, underpaid and stand all day. Like everyone else they have good and bad days and like everyone else some are idiots, some aren't. Since 9/11 the world has become a more treacherous place. We need to adjust.
My point is, travel is wonderful. There are amazing things to do and see in the world. You can't let one hour of inconvenience ruin your vacation or stop you from going again. You can't tell me these things don't happen on your home turf. A rude store clerk, angry traffic cop. Toughen up people! Don't take it personally! Get out there and have fun!
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