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parkowner
I'm a rv park owner and want to add a rec,lounge (tv),game and kitchen room to our park.Can i get some feed back from some park owners and rvers about this. I'm for it but my partners are not as positive on the idea. We have a really nice park with bathroom/showers,laundry and a office. 54 sites.

Thank You

I'M getting good reponses.Opinions vary on both sides which is good.Its giving me a understanding what people are looking for.Please keep the comments coming.
9/18/09 4:12 pm central
MaineDon
I may well be in a minority here, but, after 8 years of lots of travel, I don't think we have ever used a park's recreation room/lounge. Most of them we have seen seem to be empty and unused. We try, however, to avoid parks who are catering to families; so if this is the direction you are taking your business, then a game/video room might be good for that market.

parkowner
QUOTE(MaineDon @ Sep 18 2009, 08:49 AM) *

I may well be in a minority here, but, after 8 years of lots of travel, I don't think we have ever used a park's recreation room/lounge. Most of them we have seen seem to be empty and unused. We try, however, to avoid parks who are catering to families; so if this is the direction you are taking your business, then a game/video room might be good for that market.


MaineDon,
Thank you for your response.Most of our campers are in the 55 years and older age group, but in your travels have you seen small traveling groups use them maybe as a place to meet as a small club?
FosterImposters
We never used a rec-room when younger and traveling with kids over 3-day weekends and such. Now that we travel seasonally as full-timers, the rec room is that perfect place to catch a free cup of coffee and skim the local paper in the mornings. Kind of a cool 'meeting' place to share local information with other travelers and the park owners, swap paper-back books, join in on a jig-puzzle while laundry is running, etc. Several smaller parks in our travels use this rec-room as an extension of the office for storing/renting out various toys relevant to their park as well.
If most of your market is in the 55 plus: go for it.
cool.gif
Cheers!
parkowner
QUOTE(FosterImposters @ Sep 18 2009, 10:44 AM) *

We never used a rec-room when younger and traveling with kids over 3-day weekends and such. Now that we travel seasonally as full-timers, the rec room is that perfect place to catch a free cup of coffee and skim the local paper in the mornings. Kind of a cool 'meeting' place to share local information with other travelers and the park owners, swap paper-back books, join in on a jig-puzzle while laundry is running, etc. Several smaller parks in our travels use this rec-room as an extension of the office for storing/renting out various toys relevant to their park as well.
If most of your market is in the 55 plus: go for it.
cool.gif
Cheers!



Thank you for the info. Very helpful. If there are any other campers that would like to comment please do. This forum is just one avenue i will base my decision on. Keep them coming.
kcmoedoe
Never use the rec room or TV room or whatever when we travel. I actually try to avoid those areas because they are usually filled with unsupervised kids. At most campgrounds I have visited, even at the best one's, the rec rooms show a lot of wear and tear, furniture looks old and soiled, the TVs usually have no remote available and are showing some channel that I couldn't care less about. On the other hand, a meeting room may be beneficial if you are going to have activities, however I doubt you could get much participation out of a 50 site campground. A kitchen is a good way to get into the dishwashing and cleaning business. I owned a business with a kitchen for the employees and believe me, people are pigs when it is not theirs. I can't think of any reason I would ever use a campground kitchen, I have one in my RV and when camping, I like to use my outdoor grill.
parkowner
QUOTE(kcmoedoe @ Sep 18 2009, 11:27 AM) *

Never use the rec room or TV room or whatever when we travel. I actually try to avoid those areas because they are usually filled with unsupervised kids. At most campgrounds I have visited, even at the best one's, the rec rooms show a lot of wear and tear, furniture looks old and soiled, the TVs usually have no remote available and are showing some channel that I couldn't care less about. On the other hand, a meeting room may be beneficial if you are going to have activities, however I doubt you could get much participation out of a 50 site campground. A kitchen is a good way to get into the dishwashing and cleaning business. I owned a business with a kitchen for the employees and believe me, people are pigs when it is not theirs. I can't think of any reason I would ever use a campground kitchen, I have one in my RV and when camping, I like to use my outdoor grill.


Thank you.Good info.If i do consider this, some house cleaning,upgrades and rules would be set in place for sure.Please discussion forum, keep the comments coming! This is very helpful.
nedmtnman
QUOTE(parkowner @ Sep 18 2009, 10:40 AM) *

Thank you.Good info.If i do consider this, some house cleaning,upgrades and rules would be set in place for sure.Please discussion forum, keep the comments coming! This is very helpful.

We are fulltimers and stay in a park for a few months at a time winter and summer. Rec rooms I have noticed are used by those of us over 55 for pot lucks, games, get togethers and so on. I would think if you have quite a few guests over 55 and that stay for a while it would be an attraction.
MaineDon
QUOTE(parkowner @ Sep 18 2009, 10:46 AM) *

MaineDon,
Thank you for your response.Most of our campers are in the 55 years and older age group, but in your travels have you seen small traveling groups use them maybe as a place to meet as a small club?


Parkowner: I guess my impression has been that, when such areas are used, it is by year-round or seasonal residents. We were at a park in Visalia, CA, last May where year-round residents were having a very spirited bingo game in their club house. And my father used to winter at a park outside of Tucson where the lounge area seemed to get a lot of use. But if your park is basically for over-nighters, or if you are in a location where there is a lot to see/do (e.g., near Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Zion, etc.), I don't think people use these facilities much. I may be wrong (and just not paying attention), but such has been my impression.
John Blue
Parkowner,

As we travel our needs are small as we carry everything we need. About the only items we look for are 50 amps if weather is hot, good water, and a good working Wi-Fi system. Nice to have are cement pad or gravel pad to park on, sewer is nice but dump station works for me, and we never use any other items in a RV park. We use lots of COE and State parks as we travel. Only water and power in this type of park.
parkowner
QUOTE(nedmtnman @ Sep 18 2009, 12:28 PM) *

We are fulltimers and stay in a park for a few months at a time winter and summer. Rec rooms I have noticed are used by those of us over 55 for pot lucks, games, get togethers and so on. I would think if you have quite a few guests over 55 and that stay for a while it would be an attraction.



Thank you for the input.What you desribed is what i was thinking about it would be used for and just a sitting area to read or get out your rv for a while.Maybe have a daily paper and updated magazines on hand.

QUOTE(MaineDon @ Sep 18 2009, 12:48 PM) *

Parkowner: I guess my impression has been that, when such areas are used, it is by year-round or seasonal residents. We were at a park in Visalia, CA, last May where year-round residents were having a very spirited bingo game in their club house. And my father used to winter at a park outside of Tucson where the lounge area seemed to get a lot of use. But if your park is basically for over-nighters, or if you are in a location where there is a lot to see/do (e.g., near Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Zion, etc.), I don't think people use these facilities much. I may be wrong (and just not paying attention), but such has been my impression.



Thank you for the information.

QUOTE(John Blue @ Sep 18 2009, 03:35 PM) *

Parkowner,

As we travel our needs are small as we carry everything we need. About the only items we look for are 50 amps if weather is hot, good water, and a good working Wi-Fi system. Nice to have are cement pad or gravel pad to park on, sewer is nice but dump station works for me, and we never use any other items in a RV park. We use lots of COE and State parks as we travel. Only water and power in this type of park.



Thank you for the information.
dalsgal
In our travels we have found that most rec rooms are either dirty and uninviting or occupied by "regulars" that make us feel unwelcome. The only one I felt comfortable in was in the mountains of NC. They had a small room next to the laundry room. The room had lots of books for reading or exchange, a couple of card tables, games available and picnic tables outside where you could relax and read. Where I am now we have a rec room that is no longer used by the public. The only people that have tried to use it were people that wanted to rent it out for parties.
Lindsay Richards
What area are you from. I think that would make a big difference. We have camped hundreds of nights all over the US and I can't think of once we used the Rec room or kitchen. I have seen it used, but it seemed to be used by the long termers. If weather permits, something with a ceiling and no sides (like a pole barn) might work. If it was popular, then you could close it in at a later date. When you get into kitchen, they you get into regulations and the health department, inspections, insurances issues and thing you don't want.
parkowner
QUOTE(dalsgal @ Sep 18 2009, 10:15 PM) *

In our travels we have found that most rec rooms are either dirty and uninviting or occupied by "regulars" that make us feel unwelcome. The only one I felt comfortable in was in the mountains of NC. They had a small room next to the laundry room. The room had lots of books for reading or exchange, a couple of card tables, games available and picnic tables outside where you could relax and read. Where I am now we have a rec room that is no longer used by the public. The only people that have tried to use it were people that wanted to rent it out for parties.



Thanks for your comment.If we add a rec/lounge room we would not let our monthly campers us the facility since we give them a discount price and it would definitely be kept clean. If you knew if a campground had these rules inforce would you use the facility?
parkowner
QUOTE(Lindsay Richards @ Sep 18 2009, 10:32 PM) *

What area are you from. I think that would make a big difference. We have camped hundreds of nights all over the US and I can't think of once we used the Rec room or kitchen. I have seen it used, but it seemed to be used by the long termers. If weather permits, something with a ceiling and no sides (like a pole barn) might work. If it was popular, then you could close it in at a later date. When you get into kitchen, they you get into regulations and the health department, inspections, insurances issues and thing you don't want.



Thanks for the comment.Is there any reason why you don't us a rec/lounge room? I'm not saying their is something wrong if you don't use it,but if everything was in place and it was comfortable to use would you use it?
kcmoedoe
QUOTE(parkowner @ Sep 19 2009, 03:29 PM) *

Thanks for your comment.If we add a rec/lounge room we would not let our monthly campers us the facility since we give them a discount price and it would definitely be kept clean. If you knew if a campground had these rules inforce would you use the facility?
Just how many monthly guests do you have versus how many daily customers. A policy like this will surely make the monthlies feel like second class citizens and make them more hostile to the "better"customers. We still wouldn't use the facilities.
FosterImposters
Kcmoedoe has a good point. Care must be taken (depending upon your customer base) to avoid the "special treatment" syndrome.

We're spoiled when over-wintering in the Hemet, Calif. as the Sunland Resorts group now owns roughly half-dozen nice parks in and around the San Diego to Palm Springs areas. They actively market to the FMCA, Good Sam, Fleetwood, Winnybago, Monaco, Elks Clubs, etc., groups and thus have a nice set of 'meetin rooms' so folks can get together and enjoy each other over pot-luck breakfasts and dinners. When the groups have left (mid-week) all the rest of us can enjoy the room(s). cool.gif

Pechanga Indian Reservation's RV Resort (Temecula, California) has tried this on a smaller scale, with meeting rooms that are locked unless you are part of a sanctioned 'group' that has booked on site. Much like higher-end hotels, (they've got that too) with meeting rooms. Now in all fairness: Pechanga RV park limits your stay to 29 days, and does NOT advertise to the family or seasonal market, so they don't have the issues of fairness, or kids who trash the place (and ruin it for all the well-behaved kids).

Much depends upon your market (as others have noted). Have enjoyed this thread. Thanks for asking!
Cheers!
Texasrvers
We just stayed at a nice park that had what I would consider to be a really good rec room/lounge. The park itself is large (more than 100 sites), and there are about 50% long term tenants (not permanent) and 50% overnighters/short-termers. The rec room was about 30x30 with large floor to ceiling windows and a tile floor. It was open, bright and extremely clean. It held 7 round tables that would seat 4 comfortably and more if needed. The tables were all hard plastic and the chairs were folding metal making them easy to clean and maintain. There was a small attractive Fall decor center piece on each table. There was a small adjacent kitchen that could be locked separately, and there was another small room that had two very nice large tread mills and a book exchange area. While we were there we attended the free breakfast that they offer each morning. Since we were only there one night I can't say how much the room is used other than for breakfast, but that event was very popular.

As far as using rec rooms in other parks I have to say that we very rarely do, usually because they are not very attractive or very clean. If you put one in it would need to be kept in tip top shape or I don't think it would be used.
parkowner
QUOTE(kcmoedoe @ Sep 19 2009, 04:41 PM) *

Just how many monthly guests do you have versus how many daily customers. A policy like this will surely make the monthlies feel like second class citizens and make them more hostile to the "better"customers. We still wouldn't use the facilities.



Thank for you comment.I understand what you are saying, but our monthlies we rent to are mostly construction workers doing jobs in our area and our monthly fee includes full hookups (water,electric,sewer,wifi,cable tv) for half the cost a our nightly rate. We have our monthlies sign out rule sheet, which consist of a list of rules of what is expected of them, so they understand up front what they getting.We can ask them if they want to use the other facilities they would have to pay extra. I would think they would understand that and that would only be fair to our other campers paying full price for the facilities. What do you think?

QUOTE(FosterImposters @ Sep 19 2009, 07:42 PM) *

Kcmoedoe has a good point. Care must be taken (depending upon your customer base) to avoid the "special treatment" syndrome.

We're spoiled when over-wintering in the Hemet, Calif. as the Sunland Resorts group now owns roughly half-dozen nice parks in and around the San Diego to Palm Springs areas. They actively market to the FMCA, Good Sam, Fleetwood, Winnybago, Monaco, Elks Clubs, etc., groups and thus have a nice set of 'meetin rooms' so folks can get together and enjoy each other over pot-luck breakfasts and dinners. When the groups have left (mid-week) all the rest of us can enjoy the room(s). cool.gif

Pechanga Indian Reservation's RV Resort (Temecula, California) has tried this on a smaller scale, with meeting rooms that are locked unless you are part of a sanctioned 'group' that has booked on site. Much like higher-end hotels, (they've got that too) with meeting rooms. Now in all fairness: Pechanga RV park limits your stay to 29 days, and does NOT advertise to the family or seasonal market, so they don't have the issues of fairness, or kids who trash the place (and ruin it for all the well-behaved kids).

Much depends upon your market (as others have noted). Have enjoyed this thread. Thanks for asking!
Cheers!


Thank you so much for your input.I'm learning a whole lot of how these facilities operate without having to go there myyself.Thanks
parkowner
QUOTE(Texasrvers @ Sep 20 2009, 08:15 PM) *

We just stayed at a nice park that had what I would consider to be a really good rec room/lounge. The park itself is large (more than 100 sites), and there are about 50% long term tenants (not permanent) and 50% overnighters/short-termers. The rec room was about 30x30 with large floor to ceiling windows and a tile floor. It was open, bright and extremely clean. It held 7 round tables that would seat 4 comfortably and more if needed. The tables were all hard plastic and the chairs were folding metal making them easy to clean and maintain. There was a small attractive Fall decor center piece on each table. There was a small adjacent kitchen that could be locked separately, and there was another small room that had two very nice large tread mills and a book exchange area. While we were there we attended the free breakfast that they offer each morning. Since we were only there one night I can't say how much the room is used other than for breakfast, but that event was very popular.

As far as using rec rooms in other parks I have to say that we very rarely do, usually because they are not very attractive or very clean. If you put one in it would need to be kept in tip top shape or I don't think it would be used.


Thanks. What you said is what most of the others have said and thats keeping it clean,making it enjoyable,usable,comfortable and quite. I believe if all the campgrounds that have these faclities would operate their facility in this way it would get more use and that would in turn would mean more campers returning to the campground, also receiving new campers hearing about the facilities.Do you see it that way?
kcmoedoe
I am curious as to your revenue model for this addition. Do you intend to raise prices to cover the costs of the facility? I personally would not feel there is any added value to a park having a rec room, so it would not persuade me to pay more. Is your revenue model based on having rallies and groups use the park? If so, are you in an area where you could easily recruit such groups? Is your park big enough and empty enough to accomodate such groups? On the surface, it doesn't sound to me like this investment would pay off. You only have 54 sites to begin with. Then some of those sites are taken with your monthlies. Then you have your normal traffic. That can't leave very many unfilled sites. Rallies and groups (especially family reunions, wedding parties etc) mostly need such facilities on the weekends. Does your park have vacancies on those type dates. Don't forget your operating costs will rise. You probably would have to heat and/or air condition the facility to get maximum usage. Utility costs will rise. Unless your park is really top notch, the money would probably be better spent on items that will appeal to the majority of RVers. Things like more landscaping, patios, paved sites, recreation items if you market to families, paved roads and keeping the restrooms, laundry etc up to date. Also, more advertising would probably put more rigs in the park faster and cheaper than a rec room.
RockHound
If you are in an area where there isn't much to do, then a rec./lounge room MIGHT be a good idea. My family and I have used such a room in this case. If you have area beaches, theaters, amusement parks, etc., this room probably won't get much use. The reason I said MIGHT be a good idea earlier is wear and tear. Like someone said earlier, you almost never see these rooms in good shape. There will be pool tables with missing pool balls, and bent cue sticks. Ping pong tables with flat balls, cracked table, one paddle and no net. Torn up and stained carpet. Chairs with ripped and stained fabric. Remote-less TV and so on. You would have to spend a lot of money to keep this from happening to yours. Most people would probably rather have lower prices and no rec. room, than to have to foot the bill for something they might not even use. If you had this room as part of the office or had an employee in there, the wear and tear would be lessened. As far as a kitchen goes, I don't think I would let just any customer use it. It would be good if you offered a Saturday breakfast or Sunday brunch that you prepared, or if a group wanted to rent and use it and be responsible for its upkeep.
nedmtnman
A lot has been said here and I guess my question is where are you located? Do you get a lot of seasonal guests. Those spending the summer or the winter. If so a rec room is a nescessity as they will be older retired folks, like me, and they need a place to get together and play cards, hold pot lucks and so on. If not then whats the point unless you are going to cater to large groups that need a meeting room.
nicki
We have personally never used the rec rooms/lounges in CG's/RV parks, although we have peeked in on lots in an effort to know what our options were if it happens to rain. Every single one we have peeked in on was dark, gloomy, outdated, and not very fun or comfortable looking, and we have never gone in. I would say make it attractive in decor, keep it nicely lit, have free coffee brewing, and maybe a flat-screen TV. If possible, have it adjacent to the laundry room on one side and the campground store on another. (For guests' convenience and also so you can maybe make some of your investment back.) Maybe make it the home base for movie showings, or crafts, or card games, suited to the crowd you are trying to attract. This is my two cents, but even then I wonder how much use it would get.
rgatijnet
Personally I don't think it would take too much effort to ask your question(survey) to your overnight and long term guests if they feel that a rec room is worth paying a little extra for, or is needed. Maybe six months worth of replies would be sufficient to get a good idea of what YOUR customers would like.
Personally to me a rec center/lounge is not something that I have ever used. I do have a big dog and the whole rule about "unattended" pets comes into play also. If we are at the rec hall/lounge, can we bring our dog, or do we leave the dog unattended? I know a lot of people travel with their pets and this will have to be addressed in your rules IF you expect people to use any rec hall.
pogoil
Park owner,
We too own a small park. It is an older one but kept clean and quite. My wife and I like to meet our guests so this is a good fit for us. We have 47 sites and I can tell you that we cater to mostly retires that return each year to spend the summer as well as some retired RVers that stay on a long term basis. Our park would not exist if it did not have the small rec room we have it seats about 35 for potlucks with overflow to 2 picnic tables. It has a stove and refrigerator and a few pieces of exercise equipment. Many of our summer guests also use it for crafts, sewing and quilting as well. We also have a small coffee room with complimentary coffee and often times fresh muffins. We can have as many as 15 in the mornings in the summer and as few as 5 in the winter that come in . It also has a computer hooked to our WiFi, books, movies and a paperback exchange. I can tell you that our guests really enjoy both of these rooms. There are people that do not use them as well some do not even come out of their rigs. But the ones that do love the common areas. They are also used for ice cream socials and if 3or more rigs come in we offer the rooms for dinner or cards.
Tom
pogoil's response is good. You think you need some sort of rec room at a campground. The key is figuring out what kind. My first thought is to not have a "public" kitchen... I just don't see how you could keep that clean and safe to use.

We stayed at Nelson's campground this year in Connecticut, and their "rec" room is a huge barn-like building that can be used for a variety of things, includes the camp store, and they have a small diner-kitchen where you can buy breakfast and sometimes other meals depending on the schedule.

At Odetah (CT), they have a game room with video machines, and also a "reading room" off the camp store that is very nicely decorated with comfy chairs and a lending library. They also have a "rec hall", that is very large, half of it is enclosed and half is covered by roof only, with chairs and tables that can be moved around as needed.

I would highly suggest at least some sort of a pavilion, even if it is just a roof (certainly need a paved or concrete floor). Have picnic tables available. You may want to have a protected "kitchen area" off to the side, where people could bring their own grills / camp stoves if they want.

Many times I see partially enclosed pavilions being used by groups.

Good luck!
parkowner
QUOTE(kcmoedoe @ Sep 20 2009, 10:59 PM) *

I am curious as to your revenue model for this addition. Do you intend to raise prices to cover the costs of the facility? I personally would not feel there is any added value to a park having a rec room, so it would not persuade me to pay more. Is your revenue model based on having rallies and groups use the park? If so, are you in an area where you could easily recruit such groups? Is your park big enough and empty enough to accomodate such groups? On the surface, it doesn't sound to me like this investment would pay off. You only have 54 sites to begin with. Then some of those sites are taken with your monthlies. Then you have your normal traffic. That can't leave very many unfilled sites. Rallies and groups (especially family reunions, wedding parties etc) mostly need such facilities on the weekends. Does your park have vacancies on those type dates. Don't forget your operating costs will rise. You probably would have to heat and/or air condition the facility to get maximum usage. Utility costs will rise. Unless your park is really top notch, the money would probably be better spent on items that will appeal to the majority of RVers. Things like more landscaping, patios, paved sites, recreation items if you market to families, paved roads and keeping the restrooms, laundry etc up to date. Also, more advertising would probably put more rigs in the park faster and cheaper than a rec room.


Thank you for your time and comments.

QUOTE(nedmtnman @ Sep 21 2009, 11:09 AM) *

A lot has been said here and I guess my question is where are you located? Do you get a lot of seasonal guests. Those spending the summer or the winter. If so a rec room is a nescessity as they will be older retired folks, like me, and they need a place to get together and play cards, hold pot lucks and so on. If not then whats the point unless you are going to cater to large groups that need a meeting room.


Thank you for your comment.

QUOTE(nicki @ Sep 21 2009, 12:23 PM) *

We have personally never used the rec rooms/lounges in CG's/RV parks, although we have peeked in on lots in an effort to know what our options were if it happens to rain. Every single one we have peeked in on was dark, gloomy, outdated, and not very fun or comfortable looking, and we have never gone in. I would say make it attractive in decor, keep it nicely lit, have free coffee brewing, and maybe a flat-screen TV. If possible, have it adjacent to the laundry room on one side and the campground store on another. (For guests' convenience and also so you can maybe make some of your investment back.) Maybe make it the home base for movie showings, or crafts, or card games, suited to the crowd you are trying to attract. This is my two cents, but even then I wonder how much use it would get.



Thank your for your comments.

QUOTE(pogoil @ Sep 25 2009, 06:47 PM) *

Park owner,
We too own a small park. It is an older one but kept clean and quite. My wife and I like to meet our guests so this is a good fit for us. We have 47 sites and I can tell you that we cater to mostly retires that return each year to spend the summer as well as some retired RVers that stay on a long term basis. Our park would not exist if it did not have the small rec room we have it seats about 35 for potlucks with overflow to 2 picnic tables. It has a stove and refrigerator and a few pieces of exercise equipment. Many of our summer guests also use it for crafts, sewing and quilting as well. We also have a small coffee room with complimentary coffee and often times fresh muffins. We can have as many as 15 in the mornings in the summer and as few as 5 in the winter that come in . It also has a computer hooked to our WiFi, books, movies and a paperback exchange. I can tell you that our guests really enjoy both of these rooms. There are people that do not use them as well some do not even come out of their rigs. But the ones that do love the common areas. They are also used for ice cream socials and if 3or more rigs come in we offer the rooms for dinner or cards.


Thank you for commenting. Your information is very helpful. The way you are using your rec room is what i'm considering on how to use ours if we add it to our park.

QUOTE(Tom @ Sep 28 2009, 09:19 AM) *

pogoil's response is good. You think you need some sort of rec room at a campground. The key is figuring out what kind. My first thought is to not have a "public" kitchen... I just don't see how you could keep that clean and safe to use.

We stayed at Nelson's campground this year in Connecticut, and their "rec" room is a huge barn-like building that can be used for a variety of things, includes the camp store, and they have a small diner-kitchen where you can buy breakfast and sometimes other meals depending on the schedule.

At Odetah (CT), they have a game room with video machines, and also a "reading room" off the camp store that is very nicely decorated with comfy chairs and a lending library. They also have a "rec hall", that is very large, half of it is enclosed and half is covered by roof only, with chairs and tables that can be moved around as needed.

I would highly suggest at least some sort of a pavilion, even if it is just a roof (certainly need a paved or concrete floor). Have picnic tables available. You may want to have a protected "kitchen area" off to the side, where people could bring their own grills / camp stoves if they want.

Many times I see partially enclosed pavilions being used by groups.

Good luck!


Thank you for your comment. Its great to get hands on information from ones that use a rec room and those that don't.
Galli
[quote name='parkowner' date='Sep 17 2009, 03:45 PM' post='18999']
I'm a rv park owner and want to add a rec,lounge (tv),game and kitchen room to our park.Can i get some feed back from some park owners and rvers about this. I'm for it but my partners are not as positive on the idea. We have a really nice park with bathroom/showers,laundry and a office. 54 sites.

Thank You

When I saw your proposal and I could not refrain to provide my input.
I am one of those SNOW BIRDS travelling every winter from north (Canada) to south and in my case Florida and I urge you to go ahead with your idea to enrich your camp with those facilities.
I donít know where you are located and what type of campers is your main business, namely, if you have mostly week-enders or summer vacationers, I cannot vouch about my suggestion but, if the majority of your RVers are winter staying, I strongly recommend to add as many facility as you can provide.
I am talking about myself even if I am sure I am expressing the opinion of the majority of those who spend the winters in a camp side that more facilities are available and more people will be attracted to it.
Since you are running this kind of facility, you have noted that we socialize with each others and the best place to get together is a recreation room where we do organize local events, play cards or other type of entertainment ..etc.., furthermore, if you are going to build a cozy place and eventually include a bar and some fast food, it will help to defray the cost of the new facility since lots of people are too lazy to go back to the trailer and cook their dinner/lunch.
I am spending last 3 years in a Florida place that feature a good camp and as facility, a swimming pool, the SPA, tennis court, recreation center and other minor facilities thatís not important, however, two years ago I believe a storm destroyed the recreation room and the following winter we didnít have this facility, well at the end of our staying we didnít put down the deposit for the following year until the facility has been rebuilt.
In closing, all matter is based on what kind of people you are planning to have at your camp and how long they are planning to stay..
Food for your thought
parkowner
Galli,
Thanks for your comments.Very helpful. I couldn't reply to your comments at the usual place so i sent a new reply.
RLM
As a business proposition to gather groups, rallies, snowbird groups, etc, itís a good idea. As a place to serve a week-end breakfast for your customers, it is perhaps an amenity that most would take advantage of. I think many would much rather pay a few bucks for someone elseís breakfast than cook and clean.

As an individual, I like most, do not take advantage of rec rooms. A full kitchen is nice, but then Iíd have to take my food to it. I would just as soon cook in the RV. I have occasionally used such an area to do wi-fi when the better half sews or is watching the tube.

I recently stayed at a park that had a nice outdoor picnic pavilion with gas BBQ grills. I used it several times. Carrying my food stuffs to it was a bit of a pain, but overcome by not having to drag out and repack my own BBQ equipment.

My wife doesnít like leaving the laundry unattended in the machines. She would appreciate a rec area with comfortable furniture next to the laundry where she could read a book or watch TV and keep an eye on them.

So I guess Iím saying that, for most individuals, maybe a rec room would be based more on convenience than necessity and you'd have to figure out which one applied to your park.
parkowner
QUOTE(RLM @ Oct 6 2009, 11:45 AM) *

As a business proposition to gather groups, rallies, snowbird groups, etc, itís a good idea. As a place to serve a week-end breakfast for your customers, it is perhaps an amenity that most would take advantage of. I think many would much rather pay a few bucks for someone elseís breakfast than cook and clean.

As an individual, I like most, do not take advantage of rec rooms. A full kitchen is nice, but then Iíd have to take my food to it. I would just as soon cook in the RV. I have occasionally used such an area to do wi-fi when the better half sews or is watching the tube.

I recently stayed at a park that had a nice outdoor picnic pavilion with gas BBQ grills. I used it several times. Carrying my food stuffs to it was a bit of a pain, but overcome by not having to drag out and repack my own BBQ equipment.

My wife doesnít like leaving the laundry unattended in the machines. She would appreciate a rec area with comfortable furniture next to the laundry where she could read a book or watch TV and keep an eye on them.

So I guess Iím saying that, for most individuals, maybe a rec room would be based more on convenience than necessity and you'd have to figure out which one applied to your park.


Thank you for your comments.Very helpful.The different way's you mentioned how it could be used is what i was thinking about how it.Thank you again.
Park Manager
I recently managed a larger RV & Mobile Home Park in Oregon that had an older but large Club House with full kitchen facilities, pool table, tv (WITH remote), stereo, banquet tables, round tables, chairs and bathroom. During my time there I got an organ donated and set up a computer with wifi access. Caravan groups require this type of facility, long term stays appreciate the use for larger family gatherings, and the park is able to host special events or parties. This building was a larger double wide converted, with the office at one end. The park also offered tent sites and it was this group that REALLY appreciated the facility. They could make a real meal in the kitchen (we supplied dishes, etc.), catch up on their email, watch a show, play a game of pool - all without being in the rain and cold! By the way, I never had to clean up anyone's dishes - everyone was very respectful of the facility. Since I was in sight of this bldg I left it unlocked 24/7. One rule I enforced, no one under 16 without adult supervisioin.
maedreams
I agree that it's the over-55's that would mostly have the time and inclination to use a rec room and my ideas to encourage its use are:
1) Let arriving campers know there is coffee and newspapers in it each morning.
2) Make sure it is a clean and pleasant space in which to spend time.
3) Put photos of local attractions or local historic photos or local maps on the walls. Label the photos!
4) Be present - owners and/or work-campers should hang out in the rec room. Depending on what type of RV park, that could be at breakfast, the afternoon, or the evening.
5) Plan a weekly (at least) event in the room at various times during the day. Game night or afternoon, pancake breakfast (charge a dollar or two), pot-lucks.

If you want to try out an inexpensive rec room, the campground we just left put up a mid-sized tent as one for this winter. It has just enough room for two rectangle tables & chairs as well as the vented wood stove.

QUOTE(parkowner @ Sep 19 2009, 05:39 PM) *

Thanks for the comment.Is there any reason why you don't us a rec/lounge room? I'm not saying their is something wrong if you don't use it,but if everything was in place and it was comfortable to use would you use it?

parkowner
QUOTE(Park Manager @ Oct 20 2009, 12:48 PM) *

I recently managed a larger RV & Mobile Home Park in Oregon that had an older but large Club House with full kitchen facilities, pool table, tv (WITH remote), stereo, banquet tables, round tables, chairs and bathroom. During my time there I got an organ donated and set up a computer with wifi access. Caravan groups require this type of facility, long term stays appreciate the use for larger family gatherings, and the park is able to host special events or parties. This building was a larger double wide converted, with the office at one end. The park also offered tent sites and it was this group that REALLY appreciated the facility. They could make a real meal in the kitchen (we supplied dishes, etc.), catch up on their email, watch a show, play a game of pool - all without being in the rain and cold! By the way, I never had to clean up anyone's dishes - everyone was very respectful of the facility. Since I was in sight of this bldg I left it unlocked 24/7. One rule I enforced, no one under 16 without adult supervisioin.


Thank you for your comments.Very useful information.


QUOTE(maedreams @ Oct 20 2009, 02:17 PM) *

I agree that it's the over-55's that would mostly have the time and inclination to use a rec room and my ideas to encourage its use are:
1) Let arriving campers know there is coffee and newspapers in it each morning.
2) Make sure it is a clean and pleasant space in which to spend time.
3) Put photos of local attractions or local historic photos or local maps on the walls. Label the photos!
4) Be present - owners and/or work-campers should hang out in the rec room. Depending on what type of RV park, that could be at breakfast, the afternoon, or the evening.
5) Plan a weekly (at least) event in the room at various times during the day. Game night or afternoon, pancake breakfast (charge a dollar or two), pot-lucks.

If you want to try out an inexpensive rec room, the campground we just left put up a mid-sized tent as one for this winter. It has just enough room for two rectangle tables & chairs as well as the vented wood stove.


Thank you for your comments. Good information.
olivercamper
This is a hard question to answer. As a campground owner we have entertained the thought and dismissed it. I guess it depends on what clientele you are looking to attract . As a family campground on a lake we have found we can not even offer "activies'" ( other than holidays!)
as no one wants to participate...they would rather be out in the boat or in the pool!

If you cater to the mature camper or camping rallies, perhaps your idea would enhance your campground. Tough decision!

parkowner
QUOTE(olivercamper @ Oct 30 2009, 02:23 PM) *

This is a hard question to answer. As a campground owner we have entertained the thought and dismissed it. I guess it depends on what clientele you are looking to attract . As a family campground on a lake we have found we can not even offer "activies'" ( other than holidays!)
as no one wants to participate...they would rather be out in the boat or in the pool!

If you cater to the mature camper or camping rallies, perhaps your idea would enhance your campground. Tough decision!



Thank you for the comments.
keoweerv
I don't think I'd put one in if it's 54 sites. Because it's gotta be someone on site to monitor it - and vandalism could be a problem. That's a small amount of sites for that kind of amenity. That's a big investment for that size campground in my opinion.

-Ronnie Hughey
KristinB
We don't subscribe to a satelite TV service, so a TV room is handy to watch football games, etc. I also really like the paperback book exchanges that a lot of parks have in their rec rooms. Other than that, we don't use them much.
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