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DXSMac
One of my favorite RV parks has free WiFi. However, for awhile it was hard to get into. The owners of the park eventually figured out that when people weren't using it, they still stayed "connected" and it bogged the system down. Plus, the downloading of movies, etc.

So, the park eventually politely asked people to disconnect when they weren't using the WiFi. They also KIND OF said not to download movies, etc.

Ok, if you get free WiFi, how should you use said WiFi?

Based on the experience of my favorite park, and since I know the managers of that park, I refrain from doing any music streaming or movie downloads. I just email and surf net, as that doesn't "bog" it down much.

How do the rest of you feel? If you get free Wi-Fi, should there be any restrictions on how you use it?

(Probably going to get "attacks" for this question!!!)

JJ
Texasrvers
We only use the wi-fi for email and for surfing, ie looking up info about the local area, checking out RV parks, posting here, etc. We never use it for music or movies. I only recently learned that it is not a good idea to stay connected at a park (when you are not actually using the computer). Prior to this knowledge I admit that we did stay connected. Now we do not. If this helps make the system better for everyone, then I don't mind doing my part.

If the system cannot handle downloading movies then I see no problem with asking people not to do that. Free or not, the system is for the use of all guests. It doesn't seem fair for one person to watch a movie when that keeps several more people from using the system. Just my opinion.
abbygolden
I don't use the internet for movies, music or anything other than emails and surfing. When I'm done, I turn it off. However, if a RV Park says "free" wifi without specifying any preconditions, I don't see how internet hogging can be controlled.
joez
Stayed at a cg once that handled this issue in what, I think, is the way it should be handled. Guests were furnished a password for access to wifi (free). Useage was monitored - if you went the limit access was cut off for the rest of the day. Do not remember the exact numbers but limits set were high enough to do most routine stuff (surf/email) but movie/tv downloads or Skype, etc. would put you over the limit fast. Each guest was furnished a description of the system limitations on check in. To me, this is the professional way to do this.
DXSMac
Joez, that is a GREAT way to handle that. I like that approach!

JJ
BJMA
ANYONE that connects to a network and leaves the workstation connected deserves anything that happens to them.

Some people make it a sport to crack into others computers, and if the person is dumb enough to stay connected and not monitor the computer, is just begging for an attack.

I have been to two campgrounds where I questioned the wifi network. One was Cherryhill in the DC area. The network thruput was so low, and people would connect and stream huge files, made it impossible to get email. The other was a stop over on I-70 near Cambridge OH. I needed - desparately needed - and system file, but the wifi provider for the campgroung blocked all .dll files.
meatwagon45
For me, I do weekend camping trips. I may quickly check my email, but the point of me being at a campground is to get away from home/work. I tend to jump on quickly in the morning and again in the afternoon to see if I have any pressing work mail and get off. Sunday afternoons I usually jump on again to post a review of where I stayed. On the rare occation I might go to weather.com if the sky looks a little dark in the afternoon. I don't see a need to be online at a campground as that is not why I am there
Jerry S
I am glad to see this specific topic finally have its' own thread. The fact that customers who download movies, videos, music, pictures, and other heavy duty internet usage definitely have a negative effect on the WIFI in most RV parks has been mentioned is passing in several other WIFI related threads. Unfortunately, from comments I continue to see by some forum members, they still don't realize that their "I can do whatever I want" attitude often ruins the WIFI for other customers. Even worse, some will read this thread and still not realize that they are part of the problem.

I'm among those who mostly e-email and surf and have never downloaded a movie, video, or music - even at home.
witherig
QUOTE(Jerry S. @ Apr 1 2010, 11:56 PM) *

I am glad to see this specific topic finally have its' own thread. The fact that customers who download movies, videos, music, pictures, and other heavy duty internet usage definitely have a negative effect on the WIFI in most RV parks has been mentioned is passing in several other WIFI related threads. Unfortunately, from comments I continue to see by some forum members, they still don't realize that their "I can do whatever I want" attitude often ruins the WIFI for other customers. Even worse, some will read this thread and still not realize that they are part of the problem.

I'm among those who mostly e-email and surf and have never downloaded a movie, video, or music - even at home.


i agree that is what we going camping for. if i do use it .it is only to update the kids on what we did that day then i log off.i want to enjoy the outdoors..... same thing with folks that drive around with their cell phone glued to there ear. mine hardley ever rings when it does it scares me to death...
spring is finally here in georgia counting down the days we leave for yellowstone... whhooo hoooo!!!
DXSMac
QUOTE(Jerry S. @ Apr 1 2010, 08:56 PM) *

I'm among those who mostly e-email and surf and have never downloaded a movie, video, or music - even at home.



I didn't either, until a friend of mine got me hooked on music web sites (like Pandora.com or Rhapsody.com). I use an air card, with the typical 5 gig limit. If all I do is surf net and read email, even if I'm on the road the entire month, I only use 900 meg, less than ONE gig. Well, last month, I was camp hosting the entire month, and I streamed music on my air card, and HOO BOY, I shot the 5 gig limit. Not to mention, the park I was at, no TV reception, and, well, I HAD to watch "24" and each one hour episode uses 400 meg!

I dread getting my bill this month.......

JJ
pianotuna
Hi,

When I know I'm going to be "on the road" I make an effort before hand to download audio--books, music and etc.

That lets me be amused.....without going over any limits.
DXSMac
QUOTE(pianotuna @ Apr 2 2010, 10:57 PM) *

Hi,

When I know I'm going to be "on the road" I make an effort before hand to download audio--books, music and etc.

That lets me be amused.....without going over any limits.


But you cannot download episodes of "24" before they actually air........

But if I just stick to "24" and don't stream any music, that takes me up to 2 gig......

JJ
Texasrvers
OK, I have admitted many times that I am not the brighest bulb in the technology chandelier, so here is my next dumb question. To me "download" means you actually put the TV program (or movie, or music or whatever) on your computer. However, there are websites where you can watch programs or movies without actually putting them on your computer. So my question is when you say you download these things, do you really mean that you are putting them on your computer or are you just watching them online?
HappiestCamper
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Apr 3 2010, 11:58 AM) *

But you cannot download episodes of "24" before they actually air........

But if I just stick to "24" and don't stream any music, that takes me up to 2 gig......

JJ


There is no tomorrow - they decided to make this the last season sad.gif
Trentheim
QUOTE(Texasrvers @ Apr 3 2010, 12:40 PM) *

OK, I have admitted many times that I am not the brighest bulb in the technology chandelier, so here is my next dumb question. To me "download" means you actually put the TV program (or movie, or music or whatever) on your computer. However, there are websites where you can watch programs or movies without actually downloading them to your computer. So my question is when you say you download these things, do you really mean that you are putting them on your computer or are you just watching them online?



TX,

"Downloading" simply means anything that is coming to your computer from an outside computer. Even if you're "just watching" them online, you are downloading the entire file. The difference you are thinking of is downloading all at once vs. streaming. Streaming lets you watch or listen to something "on the fly" while all at once puts it on a hard drive for later.

We can't forget that uploading is also a major bandwidth thief. I imagine that the posting of our pictures via facebook or whatever hasn't occurred to many as a big hog of the internet. And since uploading is typically a longer duration operation, you're going to be logged into a wireless system at a CG longer (often far longer) than if you're downloading something. Even emailing a picture from a digital camera now can be a massive load on a system (considering the sheer size of the pictures nowadays).

JT3
DXSMac
QUOTE(Texasrvers @ Apr 3 2010, 09:40 AM) *

OK, I have admitted many times that I am not the brighest bulb in the technology chandelier, so here is my next dumb question. To me "download" means you actually put the TV program (or movie, or music or whatever) on your computer. However, there are websites where you can watch programs or movies without actually downloading them to your computer. So my question is when you say you download these things, do you really mean that you are putting them on your computer or are you just watching them online?


Perhaps I'm using the wrong terminology. Ok, I'm watching it online..... (fox.com/24) but you still use up bytes doing that...... I check the "usage" each morning, and on days I watch "24" online, I use up 400 meg (which includes the email and net surfing). ON days I don't do music or "24," I use up, oh.... 30-40 meg.....

JJ

Texasrvers
Thanks Trentheim for your reply. I somehow missed seeing it until just now. You explained what I didn't understand. I appreciate your help.
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