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RLM
I have a suggestion on stating that a CG is Big Rig Friendly. Certainly manuvering space is important, but good 50A service is also important. I realize that the default info states that 50A are available, but it would be nice to know in the review text if the voltage was good. Even if one used 30A on the site, I'd like to know if the voltage held up under load. I've been to places recently that didn't.
rgatijnet
Doesn't the electrical requirement apply to all rigs, big or not?
Naturally a person with a 30 rig cannot tell you about maneuverability for a 45' unit with a toad, but they may be able to tell you something about the electrical. Of course if the people with big rigs don't want that kind of info from a small rig, no problem. wink.gif
RLM
QUOTE(rgatijnet @ Jul 11 2010, 11:07 AM) *

Doesn't the electrical requirement apply to all rigs, big or not?
Naturally a person with a 30 rig cannot tell you about maneuverability for a 45' unit with a toad, but they may be able to tell you something about the electrical. Of course if the people with big rigs don't want that kind of info from a small rig, no problem. wink.gif


Please permit me to rephrase the statement.."but any good electrical service is also important, expecially for power consuming RVs.

I am not aware of what this site defines as "big rig friendly" but most likely it is, as you mentioned, a maneuverability issue. I'd suggest that the RV doesn't have to be 45 ft to be a big rig. I suspect that there are many who consider their 30 ft + 5th wheel a big rig when it comes to considering manuverability at a campground/camp site or having a need for strong, reliable voltage.

Current RVs of any size above 32 ft are now 50A capable. I think that they too might like to know if the electrical supply is a good one whether the CG has 50A, 30A, or both.

I know that we are defaulted into putting down the rig when submitting a review, but that doesn't factor into my decision. I want all the facts that I can get from anyone who takes the time to provide an input.
Tom
I don't test the electrical connections at campgrounds. They either work or they don't for me. I always try to mention the condition of the hookups (burned plug ins, bare wires, etc) but that's about it.

When I see big rigs in a campground, I will say that in my review but also will mention whether the amount of room for manuvering is good or not (lots of trees close to road, tight campsites, narrow roads, etc).

That's the best I can do for you!
RLM
QUOTE(Tom @ Jul 14 2010, 07:08 AM) *

I don't test the electrical connections at campgrounds. They either work or they don't for me.


I'd respecfully suggest that anyone with a self contained RV should monitor their voltage. It's a valid fact that any voltage below 107 will damage equipment. A roof air conditioner cost about $1500, but a plug in volt meter is only about $15. It's along the lines of putting a pessure regulator inline with the campsite water faucet.

Nonetheless, I do appreciate all other observations about big rig friendly info.
Tallboy
We have a house hold regulator because the little ones last about 6 months.

We also have a surge guard that shuts down the power to the trailer when it drops below or get to high voltage. Have had a few campgrounds were it shut it down.
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