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BriBri
I have been wondering for a while why certain RV "resorts" do not allow pop up campers, hybrids, or even travel trailers below a certain length. Are we non-motorcoach folks somehow second-class campers? I have a very nice 2010 Jayco 1206 PUP, one of the largest popups made, and I keep it and my campsite very neat, clean and presentable. I like some of the amenities that some of these "no popups allowed" RV resorts offer, but alas I cannot take advantage of them unless I consider upgrading to a larger trailer/motorhome.

Is there any way to appeal to these 'exclusive' resorts to let me in? Or is it a "not by the hair on my chinny chin chin" situation? sad.gif
dalsgal
To some campgrounds any RV over 5 years old is not welcome. Our RV is a bus conversion. We had a campground tell us they wanted to inspect it to see if it would be acceptable in their CG. I wanted to strap a rocking chair to the top and sit in it as we drove in just to tick them off but we decided to find a place that wasn't so snooty. In our CG we don't care about the age of your RV as long as it looks decent. The only reason we don't have tent camping here is the fire ants and too friendly raccoons that might try to spoil your visit with us.
DeniseN
We have a pop-up also - have not been turned away yet - have sometimes felt like the ugly stepchild next to some of the larger coaches - but oh well!! Have not had the 5 year problem yet - but we are coming up on 5 years. We have top-of-the-line Fleetwood - if they don't want us - we will move on to a friendlier place - lots to choose from.
abbygolden
To answer your question - NO. Everyone has their own wants, needs, and hopes. In our case we first started out in the back of a pickup truck using a sleeping bag as a bed. We were young and didn't have much money. As we grew older, our financial situation got better and we decided we wanted a bit more. To make a long story short, we have had motorhomes for the past many years but feel no more privileged than those who have a tent, pickup bed or whatever. As has been stated here, if one place says you don't qualify, there are many others who would love to have you and you will enjoy it just as much. There is no high or low class in enjoying our country, so have at it however you can.
edcornflake
We started with a beat up old fifth wheel. I had the truck and couldn't pass up the deal. We've since upgraded to a shiny new fifth wheel, but I've never begrudged anyone who is camping in a pop up, a tent, or in the back of a pickup. We all just want to spend time in the woods with our families, and let's be honest, you are just as likely to run into a jackass in a $300,000 bus as you are a pop up.
IF a campground makes their decisions based on what you're pulling rather than how you conduct yourself, then go elsewhere, but let folks here know that Campground XYZ is snooty and pretentious. We have the power to impact 'bad vendors' in this forum, and especially in the reviews. If they've earned your ire, speak up!
Tom
QUOTE(BriBri @ Sep 6 2011, 02:23 PM) *

Is there any way to appeal to these 'exclusive' resorts to let me in? Or is it a "not by the hair on my chinny chin chin" situation? sad.gif


Are you sure you want to go to "resorts" like that? A great quote:

"I would not join any club that would have someone like me for a member." -
-- Groucho Marx

We have yet to encounter an "exclusive" resort. The closest thing I've seen so far is part of one campground's rules, where they state that a camper should be clean and neat -- and that wasn't really enforced all that much.

I think private campgrounds should be able to make pretty much whatever rules they want. We just don't stay at the ones that we don't like.

One of our favorite campgrounds, by far, is rather rustic, small, and isn't loaded with on site stuff to do. But we have a great time there every year.
kcmoedoe
There are parks where your rig will not be allowed. Just a fact of life. I own a lot in a resort that is for Class A rigs only. The resort also has an appearance and condition requirement. The rules committee has the final say. Everything in the resort is managed and regulated. The sites must have a certain amount of landscaping. Only certain types of plants are allowed. Only certain materials and colors are allowed for shade structures, outdoor kitchens etc. To some that may be stifling creativity and stomping on their individual property rights as well as being discriminatory, but it is the reason the owners in the park pay upwards of $200K to $400K for a lot. We have had people who own Super Cs that were much more expensive than some of the rigs allowed, yet they were denied. There is no flexibility in the rules.
joez
One of the issues we have had at a few state/federal campgrounds is to wake up some morning and find that your new neighbor is in an old popup/schoolbus/TT held together with duct tape, stragecally placed rope and chewing gum, as well as, passels of kids and adults whose behavior matches the appearance of their camper. Some are obviously rolling meth labs. This is not always the case, obviously, and is probably a minority, but happens often enough that we are hesitant sometimes to stay in certain public campgrounds. But our motorhome has wheels and we can move. Private businesses have the right (and obligation) to maintain appearances that are acceptable to their patrons. Setting rules on the type of unit allowed or an age limit is an easy way to increase the chances that their clientele will fit the model they seek.

Our stick and brick is located in a neighborhood with severe restrictions. There is a one hour time limit for parking outside the garage, no street parking, limitations on size and type of house, color and landscape requirements, and on and on. Many would choose not to live there (and we probably would not except we are only there a short time) but unlike most neighborhoods nearby there are few abandoned properties and houses there sell rather quickly, even in today's market.

Instead of lamenting that you cannot get into somewhere, move to somewhere else. It will likely be less expensive and, probably, more fun.

Lindsay Richards
We have recently been out West were bears have been a problem. (Two incidents in Yellowstone) and that might be a problem. I know in some areas Yellowstone and some state and national parks do not allow tent camping. It is a safety issue there, but I suspect that this isn't what you are talking about. I have found that almost all campers are pretty nice no matter if they have a tent or a 42'ft class A. I think families even get along better when they are camping than when at home.
MCRANE
Don't be to offended. I had a friend who has over a half a million dollar hallmark supper c . He has been told he can't come into a class a only park on many occasions. I guess he isn't good enough.
DXSMac
I've not been turned away, but one time I stayed at a "resort" in Bend Oregon that..... well...... in my teensy 32 foot Class C, I felt outclassed by all the JILLION DOLLAR Class A's that had men with "trophy wife."
abbygolden
QUOTE(DXSMac @ Sep 17 2011, 07:36 PM) *

I've not been turned away, but one time I stayed at a "resort" in Bend Oregon that..... well...... in my teensy 32 foot Class C, I felt outclassed by all the JILLION DOLLAR Class A's that had men with "trophy wife."


I thought all wives were trophy wives biggrin.gif. At least mine has been for 37 years.
Tom
QUOTE(abbygolden @ Sep 17 2011, 05:46 PM) *

I thought all wives were trophy wives biggrin.gif. At least mine has been for 37 years.


She's looking over you shoulder, right? cool.gif
Wink
I think if they own a camp ground they should be able to let who every they want camp there.As for me I will not be in a camp ground that your RV can not be over 5 years old and we have a 2011.I do not like that mentality.But they should be able to make that choice.Just like I have the choice not to stay there.As for tents , pop ups and hi birds.I can think of a few places I would not camp in as I don`t want to be in the food chain as in Bear,Alligator and big cats as in mountain lions and Florida Panther.And yes it does happen.I have open the door in the morning and have had a bear out side looking for breakfast also been visited by and alligator. biggrin.gif smile.gif

As for classing a pop up what ever.What ever floats your boat.From a safety stand point I would not hole it aganst some camp grounds for the above reasion.
doubleaxlefifthwheel
I think that in a free society campgrounds/resorts should have the right to control what age and types of rv's enter their park as long as they are not discriminating. As a fulltimer for the past three years I have stayed in several parks/resorts, some longer than others. I have found that the ones with all the rules such as how your site has to be landscaped, type of rv etc. are for all practicable purposes a home owners association and not an rv park. Before the crash of the housing market many couldn't afford the high dollar second homes and rv's became their vacation homes and along with that came the rules normally associated with gated housing communities. These types of so called resorts are not what camping/rv'ing is about and I avoid them altogether. I have found that most residents of them are miserable with themselves, hate kids, hate pets, hate campfires, hate grills and cooking out and in general just seem to hate life. That's what I like about the park reviews, it gives us a way of exposing the park/resorts who are not about the true rv lifestyle and give credit to the ones who are. Growing up as a kid my family tent camped in Yellowstone, the mountains of West Virginia, the sand of Cape Hatteras and several other places. I am so thankful to have been afforded those opportunities because if it were in today's world we would surely be eaten by a bear, alligator or fire ants! So sad what things have came to!
pianotuna
Hi,

I think pop ups are great for 3 season use.
Gunnar
QUOTE(Tom @ Sep 17 2011, 06:05 PM) *

She's looking over you shoulder, right? cool.gif


Ok that made me laugh some.

Back on subject. I don't think it really matters at least not to me. As long doesn'toes'nt look like a rolling garbage can. Many don't want to/can't haul anything big. I may look at a neighboring campsite and say we were there once, but I'm not going to judge you by what you are camping in. It's camping, roll with what ya got. smile.gif
Lindsay Richards
When I was young and foolish, we snuck into a campground (Yellowstone) that did not allow tent camping. In the morning we were told that the reason was because of recent bear attacks. I think a bear would not have much trouble getting into a popup either.
jamarynn1
We were camping in the Smokies many years ago. The people next door had a pop-up. The lady put bacon grease in a jar, put the jar into a metal cannister and put that into a wooden box. That evening while they were at a campfire talk, one of the bears ripped into their pop-up, tore open the wooden box, the metal cannister and broke the jar. The ranger said that was exactly why they tell everyone never, never, never put anything that might have the slightest smell of food into a tent or pop-up, but always put it in the trunk of your car. Those furry rascals can sniff out food better than a politician can smell a photo-op.
John S.
Sometimes I look for a park that is adult oriented. No kids around and a quiet place to relax. Those usually have restrictions on either size or type or age. The age is usually just so they can turn away a seriously used up unit. Other times I will seek out a Jellystone and watch the kids or take the grandkids. It all depends on what I way at the time. Yes there are restriction on trailers, Cs and tents and popups. Sometimes for safety reasons other times as a way to make it a quieter park. Not many class A units have loads of kids, though there are bunk models out there too. There is always an option nearby everywhere unless it is for safety and bears.
nedmtnman
QUOTE(jamarynn1 @ Apr 5 2012, 03:11 PM) *

The ranger said that was exactly why they tell everyone never, never, never put anything that might have the slightest smell of food into a tent or pop-up, but always put it in the trunk of your car. Those furry rascals can sniff out food better than a politician can smell a photo-op.



I had a neighbor a few years ago in the Colorado mountains that left a large bag of sunflower seeds in the trunk of her car. Guess what. No trunk and no seeds. Mr or Ms Bear had a good meal. Most National Parks have bear proof containers for food of hang it from a tree where the bears can't get to it. What is suggested it run a rope between two trees and then hang the food from that rope.
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