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willranless
I am buying a new Open Range Fifth Wheel. Length is 40', dry weight is approx 12,000 lbs. Pin weight is 2550 lbs. I will need to buy a truck to pull it with. I would like to buy a Dodge 2500, but have concerns about this truck being large enough for this size 5'er. I've asked around and got differing opinions. Some say yes, others say no way. This topic has probably been discussed already, but I would like some fresh input from those who are actually pulling 5'ers now or have recently done so. What size and or model/brand truck should I buy to tow such a large fifth wheel? Do I need to only consider a dually?
Let me just say, I know I should be able to figure this out for myself by using simple math and the manufacturer's towing and vehicle weight ratings, but I find all that quite confusing, and since I know there are people here with real world experience, and time on their hands, who would love to share that experience with me, I'd rather get their thoughts first, then I'll do the math.
nedmtnman
QUOTE(RanMan @ Sep 18 2011, 09:23 PM) *

I am buying a new Open Range Fifth Wheel. Length is 40', dry weight is approx 12,000 lbs. Pin weight is 2550 lbs. I will need to buy a truck to pull it with. I would like to buy a Dodge 2500, but have concerns about this truck being large enough for this size 5'er. I've asked around and got differing opinions. Some say yes, others say no way. This topic has probably been discussed already, but I would like some fresh input from those who are actually pulling 5'ers now or have recently done so. What size and or model/brand truck should I buy to tow such a large fifth wheel? Do I need to only consider a dually?
Let me just say, I know I should be able to figure this out for myself by using simple math and the manufacturer's towing and vehicle weight ratings, but I find all that quite confusing, and since I know there are people here with real world experience, and time on their hands, who would love to share that experience with me, I'd rather get their thoughts first, then I'll do the math.



Bigger is always better. I pull with a one ton Ford F 350 single rear wheel two wheel drive. I have a 38 foot fifth wheel that weighs in at 13,500 with all our stuff. We are full timers on the road for 8+ years.
RLM
Here's a website that will help with your leraning curve and with the selection process. There are several links thru out the site that are informational. http://changingears.com/
I'd also suggest that you do some reading about gear ratios particularily in rear axles. They affect fuel mileage and towing capabiity.

Don't forget to add the weights of the passengers in the truck as well as the weight of the 5W hitch that you will be installing in the bed. Also know that liquids in your holding tanks weight at least 8 #s per gallon.

I prefer the extra stability of a dually, but it does take away towing capability on some trucks. I agree that bigger is better if for no other reason than it gives one peace of mind knowing that you aren't close to any limits. It's nice to have enough power to climb when needed.

I see quite a few 4 x 4s used as tow vehiles. Some might disagree, but I've never thought that particularily useful and it diminishes fuel economy. No one I know goes 4 wheeling with a 40 ft 5W.

You would be well served to become as knowledgeable as possible so that you can recognize the difference between correct and incorrect information when it's provided. If you ask a salesman about gear ratio and he gives you a blank stare, that's the wrong person to help you pick out a truck. I once had a hitch installer tell me that they were going to weld part of it to the bottom of my frame during installation. That would have invalidated the warranty on the entire frame.

Good luck and congratulations on the new rig.

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