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Beastdriver
We've been to three campgrounds in a row that advertise that they have wi-fi, and are listed in Trailer Life as having wi-fi. Yet, when we get there, we find they have a very weak wi-fi transmitter plugged into the office with no signal available outside of the office area. In effect, the campground has NO wi-fi. I would like to suggest that, when folks write up a campground, they specifically address whether or not the campground has wi-fi that reaches to the sites. Thanks!
genestoy
Beastdriver,
I concur with your assessment of some campgrounds advertising ethics! A true WiFi has an exterior (or multiple) outside antennas to spread the signal thruout the campground. I have found a neat little device that all WiFi travelers should get to greatly improve their range. My laptop plugged in at home gets no WiFi signal at all with the built in WifI, but with this adapter I get three (3) neighbors networks (and this is through all the walls) and can log on to high speed internet thru them if I wish (I don't). You might want to check it out, and prices vary all over the internet. smile.gif

http://www.linksys.com/products/product.as...cid=36&prid=669
Beastdriver
Genestoy:

The device you mentioned sounds neat. What is its name and the cost of it, and where do I get one? Thanks!
genestoy
Beastdriver--
Here is a link to some prices and sometimes they are Ebay also. Just put the model number WUSB54GP into Google and they will come up all over. I know you will be ultra-pleased with this little (and I mean little) unit. A laptop does not even have to be wireless ready just have a usb port to use this as all the wireless card and antenna are inside it. the base detaches also.

http://www.streetprices.com/Electronics/Ne.../SP1633503.html
John Blue
Beastdriver,

We also have found the same problem over and over. One site in Ohio would cover the front office only and it was a large park. Flamingo Lake RV Resort near Jacksonville had three WiFi boxes inside the park and you could pick it up anyplace you went. I add this informatiom to comments if WiFi is poor or will not work on our site. Campground owners do not wish to spend the dollars to get it right.

I checked out the USB port WiFi and I think it would do the job. Also look at this one www.radiolabs.com and you will see a long range Senao card with a plug in antenna like a car cell phone. Write up said it would travel one mlie with no antenna, I doubt it. Price was $119.95.
Homer
I agree the WIFI situation is not good at most campgrounds. This winter I paid dearly to be able to use it at our resort in Florida. It did not work 95% of the time. They had three transponders located around the park, but the signal was always weak or non-existent. At another RV park in Georgia the only reason we stopped there was to use the WIFI as advertised. Again the signal was next to zero and not usable. Tennessee same thing. In all of these c/g's the owners or management knew nothing about the system they advertised. They did not want to get involved with it at all, short of taking your money. These were all fee based systems owned by some outside concern on a revenue sharing plan with the c/g. Something is going to have to get a lot better for WIFI to continue. Most of us are computer grounded now days and while I hate federal regulations, some one needs to put their thumb on this problem. blink.gif
Browzin
OK for all of you that have a little tech. ability and enjoy making things of your own. Here is a web site that shows how to build a very simple wi-fi antenna that really does work!! I built one and was impressed with how well it worked. For less than $10 and a hour of your time you can't go wrong.

http://www.turnpoint.net/wireless/cantennahowto.html
Stephanie Hochuli
I am glad to hear that others have this problem. WE never ever know if the wi fi is going to really work or not. This time out in
Georgia, it worked perfectly in Hiawassee, as long as I went to the pavilion. Inside the coach, not a chance. Then in Elko, it again did not work.. Very weak signal, but they had high speed as well, so I simply used that instead. When we were out west last year, fully half of the campgrounds did not have any idea how their systems worked..Very frustrating.
Motorhome Madness
The real problem is the park owners or whoever is selling them the WiFi setups seems to think a nice antenna at the office hooked to a WiFi router will server the whole park. I've tried to use WiFi on this trek to the northeast more than ever before. I've had the best success with WiFi sitting close to the campground offices where I really needed to use it, I haven't found a park yet that I could use the service in the RV reliably.

I'm grateful that many of these parks even offer Free WiFi, so I hate to complain, but I guess we need to let them know that their service is less than adequate.

Here's the setup I would use, in case any RV Parks are reading this stuff! (hint, hint)

To properly deploy WiFi at a park, you should have a WiFi router every 500 feet throughout the park. I consider Cisco 1200 AP Aironet WiFi routers the best option, from the last time I researched this. They can use 802.11A to talk between the routers and provide 802.11b/g service to your users. These routers are difficult to configure, but once configured I believe they provide the best service. Since they use 802.11A between the routers, you don't have to install any cabling for each router, just get power to it, and make sure it can communicate with the next router. One router ( the one at the office will need an ethernet connection to the internet. ) You can get a weatherproof box from http://www.hyperlinktech.com and put these routers all over a RV Park to provide the best service. ( you could print this out and share it with these parks! )
Beastdriver
Webmaster: Good idea. I'll print it out and start giving it to park owners. In the meantime, perhaps, when you next update this site, the "wi-fi" designation could be split somehow--wi-fi in office area only, or wi-fi to all sites, and, of course, we could share this information in our writeups. Thanks again for your efforts and I hope you are enjoying your trip.
texaskid05
Routers every 500 ft??? LOL I install wireless at hotels and have started doing a few campgrounds, (Check out the Van Horn Texas KOA) Its free, It not only will work inside your coach anywhere in the park, But goes out well beyond the park.
It is One access point 59.00 One amplifier 250.00 One ant 18dbi gain 179.00 and will support 100 users. They only have 75 sights. 5 Routers,,,,rofl,,waste of money. two anteneas with two amps and two linksys access points (from wallmart) will talk to each other at 20 miles apart. But most people don't seem to know this or how to set it up.
mpj
From a campground owner: we have installed for WIFI - a Siemens Modem, a Linksys Router, a Netgear Access Point + Exterior antenna (on the office building), a 2nd Access Point + Antenna approxiamtely 300 feet into the park. That only reaches 1/2 our park and has cost us ove $2,000 dollars. Problem: it does not always work out in the park. It flucuates to the point that I have to reboot the system every day and sometimes 3 or 4 times per day. We know it, our tech knows it, but no one can help solve the problem. We are surrounded by businesses that may have WIFI as we get addtional SSIDs when we search for our connection. Could this be part of the problem? Anyone have any suggestions? As a side note: we had a system last year that worked but got hit by lighting this past winter when we were closed and have had to replace everything (so our costs have doubled) Our WIFI is provided thru DSL. We are trying to get it to work and we are contantly apologizing. Most of the campers do not mind coming to the office because it is still new to them and I can help them get started. But right now we are very frustrated with the whole thing. We know it brings us campers - but we also know it is turning some away when they cannot get it at their site.
Homer
biggrin.gif mpj's post just proves there is two sides to every problem. What is most important, owners are reading these post, and from this we all benefit.
texaskid05
MPJ where is your park located? You paid way to much for the equipment you have. Give me a shout
RichM
Just got back from a six state, month long trip and found three types of wi-fi availability. 1: free, accessable throughout the park; 2: free, but you have to be near the clubhouse; and, 3: At a cost via a third party acting as a gateway and the pricing ranging from $5-8/day or $25-35/month, with a one year min. commitment.

There are several different "for pay" programs, so if you decide to buy into one, it may not get you anywhere on your next stop down the road. sad.gif

The talks here have centered on items 1 and 2, but item 3 causes real problems. Why? Because the camp guide or a telephone call will tell you that they have wi-fi, but it won't tell you that it costs or that the RV park across the street provides it free. Personnally, I'd rather walk for the free service than pay more for wi-fi than I'm paying at home for DSL.

I realize it costs the park owner to install wi-fi, so I'll offer my personal preferrence. Make it free, make it available over your entire park, and increase your daily fees a buck or two to off-set your increased costs.
Big Mc
QUOTE(RichM @ Jun 22 2005, 09:00 PM) *

Just got back from a six state, month long trip and found three types of wi-fi availability. 1: free, accessable throughout the park; 2: free, but you have to be near the clubhouse; and, 3: At a cost via a third party acting as a gateway and the pricing ranging from $5-8/day or $25-35/month, with a one year min. commitment.

There are several different "for pay" programs, so if you decide to buy into one, it may not get you anywhere on your next stop down the road. sad.gif

The talks here have centered on items 1 and 2, but item 3 causes real problems. Why? Because the camp guide or a telephone call will tell you that they have wi-fi, but it won't tell you that it costs or that the RV park across the street provides it free. Personnally, I'd rather walk for the free service than pay more for wi-fi than I'm paying at home for DSL.

I realize it costs the park owner to install wi-fi, so I'll offer my personal preferrence. Make it free, make it available over your entire park, and increase your daily fees a buck or two to off-set your increased costs.


I am an RV Park owner and have been busting my back trying to keep a consistency in the wi fi in our park. I have done some research but I am very " green" in the area. I opted for the "up the rates" and offer it for free idea rather than charge for it. We are only a small park and every wi fi provider had unbelieveable rates just to get started. So, I did it myself. Our customers consist mostly of the elderly, but the "baby boomer" generation is making a huge impression on the RV world and greatly influenced my decision to get the wi fi for the park. I would greatly appreciate any help anyone could give me to make my wi fi more consistant and less of a stress on me. We are not the typical RV park owners. We are mid 30s w/ 3 children (seen and not heard......rare, I know) my husband works and I run the park to the best of my abilty but can use all the help I can get. Contact me via our website or I'll keep checking this site.
A note to the site owners: This is a great tool to keep up with your customers needs. Some of us do care. This is not a money machine for all of us.
Leah J Leon
www.mcintoshlakervpark.com
Big Mc
QUOTE(texaskid05 @ Jun 19 2005, 10:07 PM) *

Routers every 500 ft??? LOL I install wireless at hotels and have started doing a few campgrounds, (Check out the Van Horn Texas KOA) Its free, It not only will work inside your coach anywhere in the park, But goes out well beyond the park.
It is One access point 59.00 One amplifier 250.00 One ant 18dbi gain 179.00 and will support 100 users. They only have 75 sights. 5 Routers,,,,rofl,,waste of money. two anteneas with two amps and two linksys access points (from wallmart) will talk to each other at 20 miles apart. But most people don't seem to know this or how to set it up.


If you can find the time please visit our website. www.mcintoshlakervpark.com If you would, please give me a few minutes of your time with a phone call. I believe you could help me help my customers enjoy their wi fi experience more. Many thanks in advance, Leah J. Leon
ChamberlainCourt
We agree that "wi-fi" at most campgrounds equals possibly some wi-fi maybe at a few sites, not the one you are at - and high prices if it works and good luck on speed.

If you are a regular on the road and depend upon being in touch, consider a broadband air card (available from all the major cellular vendors - be sure to check on their range area maps to ensure they cover where you are going). We have a Verizon - it works in any PC (you need a network card) you have set up the software in (very easy). Great speed, great reception anywhere there are Verizon cells (which is mostly everywhere). The cost is about $50/month unlimited useage. The card you have to buy is about $100 but there is usually a rebate of some amount and it is well worth it. The service can also be suspended for months for a small fee. Check your cell service vendor to see what they offer.

We couldn't live without it. Forget modem hook-up messes, forget praying for wi-fi, forget outrageous wi-fi costs - go for the broadband air card. Verizon claims theirs works in some number of cities, but we have had great reception just about everywhere except where there is clearly no cell coverage. We use it as we are driving down the road - it's great.
Beastdriver
Rich M: Good points, but the bottom line is this: It costs money to put in a swimming pool, but campgounds will lose business without one. It costs money to install cable TV, but many people won't stay at a campground without it. It costs money to install 50-amps, but you won't get big rigs without it. The installation of a good, workable wi-fi system is much, much less than installing either a pool, or 50-amps, or cable TV. Why do campground owners not understand this? Am I missing something obvious here? We just completed a seven-month road trip and, without exception, the single greatest complaint we heard at campgrounds all across the country was about their wi-fi, most often due to the fact that the campgrounds tried to get by on the cheap.
RichM
QUOTE(Beastdriver @ Oct 12 2006, 07:03 AM) *

Rich M: Good points, but the bottom line is this: It costs money to put in a swimming pool, but campgounds will lose business without one. ...the single greatest complaint we heard at campgrounds all across the country was about their wi-fi, most often due to the fact that the campgrounds tried to get by on the cheap.


Yep, and a lot has changed in the year+ since I wrote that. I owned my own business half of my adult life and I know that improvements and upgrades cost money. The customer is the only one that can pay for those things but in a free economic system, competition forces moderation in price increases. With that understanding, I'm willing to pay for the services I get. Remember the day when you could get a site for $4-$8/day? Sure, inflation has accounted for a lot of the increase, but so has improved amenities.

Still, I totally agree with the major complaint of the day being the shamefull wireless service being offered. You read the ad - Free wireless (or, maybe even "wi-fi available") - go there and discover it doesn't work, or at least not at your site. The idiots that run these ads trying to fool the RV traveler are doing nothing but hurting themselves.

Personally, I think a data base should be opened here that allows users to post good/bad about any resort or campground as a personal opinion, complete with name, address, and mgr. phone number. Then we might see some sudden improvements. dry.gif
Galli
QUOTE(mpj @ Jun 20 2005, 07:19 AM) *

From a campground owner: we have installed for WIFI - a Siemens Modem, a Linksys Router, a Netgear Access Point + Exterior antenna (on the office building), a 2nd Access Point + Antenna approxiamtely 300 feet into the park. That only reaches 1/2 our park and has cost us ove $2,000 dollars. Problem: it does not always work out in the park. It flucuates to the point that I have to reboot the system every day and sometimes 3 or 4 times per day. We know it, our tech knows it, but no one can help solve the problem. We are surrounded by businesses that may have WIFI as we get addtional SSIDs when we search for our connection. Could this be part of the problem? Anyone have any suggestions? As a side note: we had a system last year that worked but got hit by lighting this past winter when we were closed and have had to replace everything (so our costs have doubled) Our WIFI is provided thru DSL. We are trying to get it to work and we are contantly apologizing. Most of the campers do not mind coming to the office because it is still new to them and I can help them get started. But right now we are very frustrated with the whole thing. We know it brings us campers - but we also know it is turning some away when they cannot get it at their site.

laugh.gif Thank you for your honest statement MPJ, I sympathize with what you are saying, I see that running an efficient business implies headache and money too, however and if I may advance my point of view, ohmy.gif did you specify, exactly, what you wanted to the company that installed the devise, at the time of the contract, of course ? I am talking about specifics in the contract, did you specify the range that the devise was needed for ? If this is the case and the product delivered was not in accordance with the specification as per contract, you may pursue the matter legally. ph34r.gif
Going back to the actual campsite, I would be ready to wave your responsibility for not providing the service to every corners of your campsite as long as you can provide a place where the campers could go to use the system. smile.gif
What I am really criticizing is those campgrounds that advertise the service when the signal is not existent.
Years ago I was in Carrabelle, Florida, the campsite had an HiFi equipment, however, the strength of the line was providing service as far as 30 - 40 years around the recreation center, well, I wasn’t happy but at least I could go there and use my computer whenever I wanted. cool.gif
In your final noted, I read that some campers left the place because the internet line was not up to their side, well MPJ, you will never satisfy every body, you will always fine some one complaining that the space is too small, too big, too far or too close to the water or…. Invent…., the most important thing is that you have an operational internet and for good business, you should mention to the new comers that places such and such are receiving internet service up to the trailer the rest of the places must commute to the recreational center in order to have such a service.
In closing, you could increase the rates for the service when accessible from the RV. rolleyes.gif
Intheknow
I can tell you exactly what is going on when it comes to poor wifi signal. I am a tech support agent for a wifi provider at Florida RV campgrounds. so I am as my nic says, "In The Know"...

Before you blame your wifi provider, you need to know about how the technology works and what its limitations are.

let me explain some major points.

RVs aren't the worlds greatest for enhancing wifi signal. As a matter of fact they cause tons of interference when the wifi signal is trying to penetrate the aluminum/fiberglass shell of your RV. If you cannot get a decent cell phone signal or a radio signal inside your RV, what on Gods green earth makes you think that you will get a good signal from an antenna that is 400, 500, 600, 700+ feet away?

Do you call your telco because your cordless phone wont get a signal when you are a mile away from it?

You can read more on wifi Range issues here:
http://www.wi-fi.org/knowledge_center/kc-w...andenvironment/

The built in wifi device in your laptop is simply put, too weak to be effective over long ranges. It was designed to be used in a home or office network, not 300+ feet.

The issue isnt that our antenna cannot see your radio, its the other way around. YOUR 30mw built in wif device is not powerful enough to travel thru the paneling> insulation > aluminum/fiberglass shell of your RV or in other words, the providers wifi antenna isnt seeing your computer because its like an ant trying to talk to a giant.

Better yet, you could compare it to trying to have a conversation across a lake with the other person talking thru a bullhorn and you without. Yeah, sure you can hear the other guy talking thru the bullhorn, but they cant hear you.

Another complaint we get is this. "It worked fine until others came in and parked around me"
Again, the problem here is interference.

I always recommend to our customers that they buy at least a 200mw USB wireless device.

Something else that works is simply stepping out of your RV. Most of the time you will find that once you are outside of the interference of your RV, your signal will be better.
Beastdriver
Intheknow:

With all due respect, I certainly hope I never have an electronics problem and have to call upon you. I showed your comments to three friends who are electronic "nerds" and all agree: You make some valid points but, for the most part, are way off base. Each of my friends noted that wi-fi reception is almost always a function of how far you are located from a transmitting device (repeater or antenna.) In fact, the very article you cited in your comments notes that you "could get a signal from up to a mile away depending on the antennas you use and environmental conditions. I see parks all the time with little bitty "rabbit ears" antennas atop a building and poor wi-fi reception. They won't pay to install a system with the proper antenna, and with additional repeaters or antennas throughout the park.

The article you cited also noted that you can greatly improve range and performance by adding more antennas--a situation that most RV parks don't address.

I have a DataStorm satellite system whereby the signal received via satellite is transferred to a LinkSys wi-fi system which, in turn, broadcasts throughout the coach and to nearby coaches. On many occasions, I have had neighbors parked several spaces away use my system when they could not get the wi-fi signal from the park because of a lack of antennas and repeaters.

Again, I state emphatically, if a park advertises wi-fi, the management of that park should spend the dollars necessary to place antennas and repeaters throughout the park so that all campers in that park can access the system with reasonable speed. I'm sorry but I don't buy your arguments, and neither do other knowledgeable electronics people.

One of the problems we run into time and time again is that RV park management, not being experts on wi-fi, hire so called local "experts" to install a system that doesn't work as promised. These so-called experts provide a low-ball bid to get the job, and leave the park owners holding the bag when it comes to actual performance. And as a person who stays in 50-60 RV parks throughout the country every year, I can assure you that I am in-the-know about this!
Cheryl Fuller
I am not "in the know" about technology things, but we recently stayed at an rv park in Wyoming that adverised wi-fi in big letters in their ad. As that is important to us, we selected this park, only to learn that the only place their wi-fi could be accessed was standing outside the office window - no tables, chairs, or even window ledge to sit your laptop on on - just had to stand there and hold it. To me this was certainly deceptive advertising...
Beastdriver
Cheryl: I think we may have stayed at the same park. The one I was at also had big letters promoting wi-fi in their ad, but they had a wireless router with small rabbit ears sitting in the window on the first floor of their office. It had a range of about ten feet. Again, they simply either did not want to spend the money to have the proper antenna on their roof, or did not know they should (which I doubt.)
RLM
While we're on this subject, more or less involving campground advertising, what about those that state cable available but only provide a handful of channels? Or the "big rig" friendly parks where the sites aren't or they don't want to put you in one because you aren't 45 feet long? Then there are the campground directories that rate a park high, but when you get there, you'd have a much lower opinion of it.

The previous suggestion made by ChamberlainCourt about the cell service wireless data card is valid. For about the same monthly fees that you would pay for Wi-Fi, you can get wireless service that is pretty much good anywhere you travel - and even while you are moving. At this moment I am in a Corp park in the middle of nowhere (on a large site) and am connected via my wireless data card. Later, I'll be able to watch 100+ channels on my satellite system. It's nice to be independent of the advertising.

This is one of the best websites to get an honest opinion(s) on campgrounds. I would respectfully suggest that when we do provide one, we include the positives or negatives of what was advertised. I also agree with the Administrator on the suggestion of feedback to campground owners.

Rich















ChamberlainCourt
Cheryl Fuller
Rich, most of us don't have overly high opinions of most of the directories. I mainly use them to see what parks are available in the area we will be travelling and then check to see what my friends here have to say about those parks....
Homer
I consistantly receive bad WIFI service at most campground pay or free. Actually none are really free, if you notice the c/g fee went up as soon as they advertised WIFI. I am sure there are some that are honestly trying to accomadate the RVer, most are just using it as bait to get the RVer in the lot. Using the same lap top, I get excellent WIFI signals at truck stops.
Wadcutter
For the WiFi geeks or those who know - My laptop has the built in WiFi. Sometimes it gets a good signal and sometimes not. It looks like the cantennas are used when one has a WiFi card but not for internal WiFi. I've read some places where people recommend the Hawking HWU8DD or the HWL2 or some places of building their own www.usbwifi.orcon.net.nz .
So what's the easiest to use and will get the best results? I don't want to spend the money on something that really won't be much improvement, aggravate with something that constantly needs tweaking, or building something that really doesn't work.
Appreciate the help.
Beastdriver
Wadcutter: Unfortunately, if your unit has a modern wi-fi card in it, there is not a lot you can do if the signal is not there in the first place. If the Park has wi-fi service, but does not take the necessary actions, as described herein, to cover the park with antennas and repeaters, you can slightly tweak your reception with hardware such as Hawking and others but you cannot, under any circumstances, amplify a signal that does not exist. The problem is not with your equipment so much as it is with the failure or the campground to propertly project and direct its signal throughout the park.
Intheknow
Beastdriver,

I do this for a living, so every point I brought up was valid.

Now, Im not saying that there aren't parks that offer shotty Wifi service because there are. But, in our case, we have an average of 3-4 high gain antennas in the best locations around the parks, sitting anywhere from 10 to 15 feet above ground throughout our parks.

I still get calls daily about connectivity issues, and its not because we are using junk equipment.

QUOTE

"could get a signal from up to a mile away depending on the antennas you use and environmental conditions"


That is a very powerful statement and my exact point.

If you are using a 20mw wifi transceiver sitting inside your RV that has insulation, a steel frame, aluminum/fiberglass shell, 500 feet away from the wifi access point thats where those pesky "antenna you use and environmental factors" factor in.

Plus other environmental factor are, how many RVs are around you? Do you have a microwave oven in your RV? How about a cordless phone that operates on the 2.4Ghz band? All of which are instances of environmental interference.

Radio communication (what wifi basically boils down to) is a two way street. Its like trying to use a walkie talkie CB to try to talk to someone that has a high powered radio with a linear amplifier. You can hear their broadcast but try as you might, they will never hear you.
Beastdriver
Intheknow:

Thanks. Obviously, if you have antennas throughout the park as you say, but you still have guests that cannot receive it, you need to place additional antennas or move the ones you have. You substantiate my point: If you put in the right equipment, in the right places, no guest should be without wifi.
bccamper
QUOTE(Beastdriver @ May 25 2005, 08:57 AM) *

We've been to three campgrounds in a row that advertise that they have wi-fi, and are listed in Trailer Life as having wi-fi. Yet, when we get there, we find they have a very weak wi-fi transmitter plugged into the office with no signal available outside of the office area. In effect, the campground has NO wi-fi. I would like to suggest that, when folks write up a campground, they specifically address whether or not the campground has wi-fi that reaches to the sites. Thanks!
bccamper
QUOTE(Beastdriver @ May 25 2005, 08:57 AM) *

We've been to three campgrounds in a row that advertise that they have wi-fi, and are listed in Trailer Life as having wi-fi. Yet, when we get there, we find they have a very weak wi-fi transmitter plugged into the office with no signal available outside of the office area. In effect, the campground has NO wi-fi. I would like to suggest that, when folks write up a campground, they specifically address whether or not the campground has wi-fi that reaches to the sites. Thanks!
Cheryl Fuller
Please do not think I am being rude or mean, I am really not trying to be. I often see posts on this forum where someone is "quoting" another post, but there is no reply from them other than the cited post. I am just wondering why this is - is it that they agree with everything said and have nothing to add, or is it that they did add a post but some techincal glitch prevented their reply from being posted? I really am quite curious about this......
Beastdriver
Cheryl: I think it is because the "Quote" and ""Reply" buttons are not intuitive, and are often confused with the "Fast Reply" "Add Reply", etc., buttons. My son is a professor of Human Factors (making devices, etc., user friendly) at a major university, and he says that this site, while generally well-designed, is a killer when it comes to these areas. That's why you see so many "quotes" hanging out there with no response. Perhaps, when this site is next cleaned-up, the Webmaster will consider making these buttons more intuitive.
Cheryl Fuller
Beastdriver, thanks for the explanation. Being the nosy type anyway, I just have to know what is going on and have been wondering about that one for awhile. Several of the forums I am on, have the fast reply button, but as I don't know what purpose it serves, I have never used it.
jauth1
QUOTE(Cheryl Fuller @ Jan 28 2007, 12:44 PM) *

Beastdriver, thanks for the explanation. Being the nosy type anyway, I just have to know what is going on and have been wondering about that one for awhile. Several of the forums I am on, have the fast reply button, but as I don't know what purpose it serves, I have never used it.
jauth1
Hello...I am not a computer expert, my grandkids are...I had Issues with WI-Fi in campgrounds...So I called a HotSpots WiFi Tech...He said to go to ALK Hawkings Technoligy...Check out the Hi- Gain Antenna Laptop Card..HWC 54D...Solved my Issues with Wi-Fi Signal 95% OF the time......Also a Hawkings Hi-Gain Antenna HWU 54 DM USB Port and a Hawkings Hi Gain USB Wireless Dish HWU * DD..(Ht.3"x W. 3") They also have Outside Hi-Gain Antennas for Roof Top Mounting....Many Online Web Store to make Purchases.......I was last month picking up a signal, that the campground had Wi-Fi in a Box System....One basci Hi-Gain Antenna on Campground Office Roof top....I was 1500ft. from the office antenna and got a Normal Signal with the Hawkings Hi-Gain Antenna....Also anybody in sites close to me with a built in wi-fi mini card in the laptop, got no signal at all.....These Hi-Gain Antennas for Laptops do work...I have been to 2 campgrounds that have handed out printed Info on Hawkings Products.....Just My Experience....Jim A.
Wadcutter
I decided to build one like this:
http://dustydragon.com/wifi.htm
Even with a built in WiFi it looks like there is something that can be done to improve reception. It works really well. Much improvement over the internal WiFi card.
Jerry S
I certainly agree with the general complaint concerning "misleading WIFI Claims" and have experienced poor service in many WIFI parks. Although I understood some of the simpler discussions in this string, the more technical ones made my head hurt. I am not sure that I am ready to spend good money for "gizmos" I might not have the techno-smarts to use correctly. On the other hand, in two plus years I have been bringing the laptop along on my trips, several of my repeat parks have uprgraded their systems. Hopefully this is a trend that will continue and maybe even accelerate.

For now, I will ask about the quality of the WIFI service and continue to let owners know that poor WIFI will limit my stay or cause me to not stay at their park. It can't hurt.

Jerry S.
Wadcutter
JerryS,
Building one of these gizmos http://dustydragon.com/wifi.htm doesn't take any technical knowledge. If I could build one anyone can. It's amazing the increased range they provide. With a 12" scoup I can now hit my home WiFi from over 1/2 mile away. I think it would pick up further than that but haven't had the chance yet to get further out. I've got less than $25 in it.
Jerry S
Wadcutter,

Thanks for the info and encouragement. I checked out the site you referenced (and most of the further links listed in that site). Let's see: buy a dongle (USB adapter), a scoop (oriental cooking utensil), a USB cable (length depends on situation); then using a wire hanger, duct tape, and tools, fashion all this into a signal amplifying device. I know it sounds simple in terms of cost, time, and effort, but I am not certain the poor WIFI reception problem will continue to exist in the RV parks I visit.

Thanks again,

Jerry S.
jauth1
Jerry...Hawkings Hi-Gain Antennas cost about $60 bucks.....It will solve your problem, quicker then waiting for a Campground to change......Jim A. smile.gif
Jerry S
QUOTE(jauth1 @ Feb 26 2007, 10:06 PM) *

Jerry...Hawkings Hi-Gain Antennas cost about $60 bucks.....It will solve your problem, quicker then waiting for a Campground to change......Jim A. smile.gif


Jauth1,

Sorry for not getting back to you sooner - I've been distracted in another string. Thanks for the lead. I'll google "Hawkins Hi-Gain Antenna" and see where is takes me.

Jerry S.
Wadcutter
A buddy has one of these. His seems to work pretty well.
Hawking HWU-8DD
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