Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Nova Scotia Trip Help Needed
RV Park Reviews Campground Discussion Forum > RV Park and Campground Discussions > RV Park Discussions
carlhero
We are planning to take the ferry from Portland,ME the end on Aug to Yarmouth, NS staying in Digby, Halls Harbor,Canning then on to New Glascow,to Rt 19 up the Cape Breton coast around to North Sidney, to Louisbourg following the coast to Halifax back to Yarmouth.
The trip should take about 4 weks and we would appreciate any positive and or negative information relative to CG's (must have at least 15 AMP service-we have a class cool.gif,restaurants,wineries,music and attractions.
We would appreciate all comments.
Butch
The ferry from Portland Maine to Yarmouth, NS did not run in the year 2005 and is uncertain for the 2006 season. The only ferry from Maine to Yarmouth is from Bar Harbor, on Mount Dessert Island, and is called "The Cat". The Cat makes the trip in about two hours and forty-five minutes each way, travels at fifty-five mph, and makes the eastward trip in the morning, and returns westward to Bar Harbor in the afternoon. There is another ferry from Saint John New Brunswick to Digby NS but do not know the schedules. These ferry crossings are expensive, check pricing. Note that during the months of July & August, sea fog on Nova Scotia can be heavy, and limits your vision. We had been told to do the Cabot Trail counter clockwise, but be advised that the passenger may not appreciate the lack of guard rails and the elevation. (fear of heights) The day we were going to drive the trail , the fog was thick, so we went to Halifax instead. Sorry we do not have any info on the campgrounds, as we stayed in a housekeeping cottage.
olszinner
Butch,
Thanks for the info. I'm surprised that the CAT website did not mention no service from Portland so I'll have to follow up. BTW a friend last week told me to do the clockwise route around Cape Breton for the same reason you mentioned. I'l still looking for elec service at CLEAN CG's if anyone has any imput. Thanks again.
Butch
You are very welcome. glad we could help. Safe travels.

Note: The ferry from Portland to Yarmouth was named "The Bluenose".
Kevin W
Avoid the Pictou area for anything overnight. Pictou, while beautiful and right near where you cross over to Cape Breton, has a LARGE papermill and the stench is horrendous. Baddeck on Cape Breton is a great area, especally for the music. Ingonish is also very nice. In Nova Scotia, Halifax is a good stop. Avoid Peggy's Cove - SUCKER BAIT!!! Fortress Louisville is a must see - hopefully you will have better weather than we did. Enjoy Nova Scotia.
Kevin
carlhero
QUOTE(Kevin W @ Jun 18 2006, 07:17 AM) *

Avoid the Pictou area for anything overnight. Pictou, while beautiful and right near where you cross over to Cape Breton, has a LARGE papermill and the stench is horrendous. Baddeck on Cape Breton is a great area, especally for the music. Ingonish is also very nice. In Nova Scotia, Halifax is a good stop. Avoid Peggy's Cove - SUCKER BAIT!!! Fortress Louisville is a must see - hopefully you will have better weather than we did. Enjoy Nova Scotia.
Kevin



Kevin,
That's good info, we appreciate it.
Since our origional post we have decided to stay at St Andrews again and take the ferry from St Johns to Digby, mainly because of the cost difference. Does Baddeck have music festivals or is there someplace special to visit for that ?
Thanks again for your input.
Ron & Sandy
We stayed at the Mid Trail Inn in Pleasant Bay on the Cabot Trail in August 2005. They were in the process of building an RV facility adjacent to the Motel. The location is beautiful. You might contact them and see if they have completed the RV area. We did see a class C unit staying in the unfinished park for a day or so. We also saw a moose behind the motel!

The Cabot Trail is beautiful and we did it in both directions. Either way is great. Baddeck is also a wonderful area. Peggy's Cove is quite beautiful if you get there early in the day before the crowds.


Ron & Sandy
mainetom
FYI re. ferry from Maine to Nova Scotia. The Cat now runs from both Portland and Bar Harbor, same boat, different days. It's not inexpensive, but it's a fun ride and a fast way to get to NS. Details at: http://www.catferry.com/
wprigge
Hi carlhero,
I have another suggestion for you. I don't think you gain any time by using the Maine-Nova Scotia ferries, but you can do something a little more off the beaten track. You can take the bridge from Maine to Campobello Island, New Brunswick. There you can visit President Rooseveldts Summer Cottage. There is a provincial park with 30 amps hook-ups on Campobello Island in case you want to stay overnight. From Campobello there is a small ferry to Deer Island, N.B. (http://www.eastcoastferries.nb.ca/) that passes right next to the biggest tidal whirlpool in the Americas. It is called the Old Sow as it makes slurping noises during the fall and spring high tides. (No, this is not a sailors yarn!) Sightings of dolphins and porpoises are practically guaranteed on this 30 min. crossing. When you arrive on Deer Island you are right next to a campground with a million dollar view over the whirlpool with the Town of Eastport, Maine over the water. From Deer Island there is a free gouvernment ferry to L'Etete on the mainland that winds its way through the islands and shoals of Passamaquoddy Bay. Very picturesque. From there it's only a short drive to Saint-John. As you have 4 weeks for your trip you can continue along the Bay Of Fundy and visit Fundy National Park. A little further along the coast there are the Hopewell Rocks, giant flowerpots where you can walk on the ocean bottom at low tide. (http://www.thehopewellrocks.ca/) From there on to Moncton, N.B. where you might catch the Tidal Bore. (http://www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca/en-ca/products/unusual/ebe97ef2-65fa-4ee2-b2d1-cba278447397.htm) From there it is only a short drive to Nova Scotia. Stop at the provincial tourism info station. Most of the time there is a piper playing, dressed in full highland garb. You might want to do a little detour to the Pugwash area. There are wineries and the Seagull Pewter factory there. Inquire at the Provincial Welcome Centre. As for camping in Cape Breton, I stayed in the National Park Campgrounds near Cheticamp in 1999. It had 30 amps service and was quite Ok. The other campgrounds in the park seem to be ok too, but I haven't stayed there in over 20 years. On my way back from Newfoundland in 1999 I stayed in Hyclass campground in Havre Boucher just a few miles off the Canso Causeway. At the time they had a piper on the beach every evening in season, but I don't think they have now. (http://www.hyclass-campground.com/) The campground itself was ok. Near Halifax there is a Municipal campground on the Dartmouth side. It is only a short drive to the ferry where you can leave you vehicle. The ferry will bring you right to the foot of downtown Halifax. (http://www.shubiecampground.com/) You will probably find the best part of going to the Canadian Maritime Provinces is meeting the people. They are impossibly friendly and welcoming. Have fun.
Butch
Have been to Campobello numerous times. FDR's cottage at Campobello is very interesting, and the island is scenic and not to populated. Note that the shops and business places close at 5 PM. We were there the last time in 1998, and will not return, as we were singled out for a search of our vehicle, upon trying to enter at the Canadian border crossing. The Canadian female border guard was less that friendly and was not at all welcoming. She was darn right nasty. I will not go into details, but was not a pleasant experience. Upon arrival home, I e-mailed their Department of Tourism about the incident but did not receive an answer. So a word to the wise, watch yourselves at this crossing point. We have not returned to Canada since. We have plenty to see in our own country, "the good old USA."
rvingwithkids
Your probably alread in the road, but if not you might consider going to Newfoundland. We are on the ferry as I type headed back and the campgrounds are empty up there. Very friendly people everywhere we went, and lots of trails to hike, lakes and streams to fish, and great weather!
carlhero
QUOTE(wprigge @ Jun 27 2006, 07:28 AM) *

Hi carlhero,
I have another suggestion for you. I don't think you gain any time by using the Maine-Nova Scotia ferries, but you can do something a little more off the beaten track. You can take the bridge from Maine to Campobello Island, New Brunswick. There you can visit President Rooseveldts Summer Cottage. There is a provincial park with 30 amps hook-ups on Campobello Island in case you want to stay overnight. From Campobello there is a small ferry to Deer Island, N.B. (http://www.eastcoastferries.nb.ca/) that passes right next to the biggest tidal whirlpool in the Americas. It is called the Old Sow as it makes slurping noises during the fall and spring high tides. (No, this is not a sailors yarn!) Sightings of dolphins and porpoises are practically guaranteed on this 30 min. crossing. When you arrive on Deer Island you are right next to a campground with a million dollar view over the whirlpool with the Town of Eastport, Maine over the water. From Deer Island there is a free gouvernment ferry to L'Etete on the mainland that winds its way through the islands and shoals of Passamaquoddy Bay. Very picturesque. From there it's only a short drive to Saint-John. As you have 4 weeks for your trip you can continue along the Bay Of Fundy and visit Fundy National Park. A little further along the coast there are the Hopewell Rocks, giant flowerpots where you can walk on the ocean bottom at low tide. (http://www.thehopewellrocks.ca/) From there on to Moncton, N.B. where you might catch the Tidal Bore. (http://www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca/en-ca/products/unusual/ebe97ef2-65fa-4ee2-b2d1-cba278447397.htm) From there it is only a short drive to Nova Scotia. Stop at the provincial tourism info station. Most of the time there is a piper playing, dressed in full highland garb. You might want to do a little detour to the Pugwash area. There are wineries and the Seagull Pewter factory there. Inquire at the Provincial Welcome Centre. As for camping in Cape Breton, I stayed in the National Park Campgrounds near Cheticamp in 1999. It had 30 amps service and was quite Ok. The other campgrounds in the park seem to be ok too, but I haven't stayed there in over 20 years. On my way back from Newfoundland in 1999 I stayed in Hyclass campground in Havre Boucher just a few miles off the Canso Causeway. At the time they had a piper on the beach every evening in season, but I don't think they have now. (http://www.hyclass-campground.com/) The campground itself was ok. Near Halifax there is a Municipal campground on the Dartmouth side. It is only a short drive to the ferry where you can leave you vehicle. The ferry will bring you right to the foot of downtown Halifax. (http://www.shubiecampground.com/) You will probably find the best part of going to the Canadian Maritime Provinces is meeting the people. They are impossibly friendly and welcoming. Have fun.



Thanks for your input. We agree that is a great way to go. We did that a few years ago when we rented the Leisure Van we ended up buying. So far we are planning on driving to St Andrews staying at the Kiwanis again & taking the ferry to Digby & spending several days in that area before hitting the wineries and sites up to Cape Breton around to Baddock, Sidney to Halifax & back to Digby. We're looking forward to the sites, museums,music & food.
Also thank you Butch & rvingwith kids for your input as well.
Carl Hero
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.