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mstennmom
biggrin.gif We are looking to purchase another RV. We did own a RV for a year or so but sold it about 2 years back. I would like to compare the mileage of different RVs all classes and Trucks used to pull trailers. I would like as many posts as possible so I and others can use it to help determine the best purchase for our use. Could you please describe the RV if it is deisel or unleaded, size, year, make, model etc. and if you tow a vehicle behind or same type Truck information used to pull the brief trailer and trailer description and post what your mileage is on the road or used for towing. I am really confused about what type of motorhome to purchase and unfortunately, for us the mileage is something for us to consider. I thought instead of looking for site after site to get this information which is actually pretty difficult to find, I would ask for the campers to post this information and then we could review this to help us determine which type of camper to purchase. I will not use this information for any other reason and I really don't ask for anyone to leave other information but if they would like to give other relavant info like if they would recommend the camper or vehicle then I would appreciate that as well. I think that this information would be extremely helpful to others out there looking at this information in relation to purchasing a new camper. Thanks for your help.
Beastdriver
We drive a 41 foot Dutch Star with a 330HP Caterpillar engine and tow a Honda CRV. We have found that, while driving around 62-63 miles per hour on level interstates, we get around 9 miles per gallon of diesel fuel.
Of course, this will vary depending on winds, grades in the highway, and other factors. By the way, has anyone yet figured out why diesel fuel, which is basically unrefined very low-grade gasoline, costs much, much more than the lowest grade of gasoline these days? Is it just another example of the fact that we have the best Congress that money can buy?
OldSoldier
Welcome to the Forum and I hope the info you receive here helps.

We pull a 25foot 2006 Jayco Fifth Wheel Trailer that weighs about 7300 lbs loaded for the road. We tow with a 2005 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 6 liter gas engine, Crew Cab, Short bed and 4 wheel drive.

We just returned from a 32 day trip from southeast Arizona up through the Pacific Northwest, and returned through Idaho, Montana, Utah and back to Arizona.

For perspective this is a tough mountainous trip with many mountains and long steep grades.

We covered 4318 miles door to door including in-and-around (without trailer) mileage. I kept detailed gas purchase and mileage records for my own future planning purposes. We achieved 10.8 mile per gallon and paid an average of 2.78 per gallon.

I was pleasantly surprised with performance of the set, both truck and trailer, and am looking forward to planning our next outing. Hope you find the same rewarding experience with what ever you plan to buy.

Good luck,
OldSoldier

smile.gif
John S.
I have a duramax allison 3500 dually and get 16 empty and less pulling anything. I have a 36 foot DP with an ISM engine and get 7-8 mpg and have a 22 foot born free and get 10-11 on a ford cutaway. Speed affect results too. On the Foretravel I do not go into 6th gear till I hit 62 mph.
John Blue
We have a 36 ft Foretravel motorhome at 30,000 lbs with 300 HP rear diesel and tow a Honda CRV at 3100 lbs. We travel on level roads at 60 - 65 MPH and get around 8.5 to 10 MPG. In the hills you will get less and on flat roads more. A diesel burns no fuel on down hill runs and on run from Grand Junction, CO into Denver and on east we hit 11.6 MPG. On one trip of 8800 miles our average was 10 MPG over hold trip. The trick is speed, the faster you go the more fuel you will need. The wind can be a problem due to flat front end as times, more fuel cost.

Like Beastdriver said diesel cost less to make and they charge you more to buy it. All the large trucks on road use a lot of fuel and fuel people need more dollars. One more trick diesels run cool at around 180 degs. Gas engines run very hot and on hills will cook. You will lose around 3% power in a gas engine for each 1000 ft of elevation you climb over sea level. More gas and less O2 will heat up a gas engine. Diesels do not have this problem and will run at 13,000 to 14,000 ft with no problems.
mastercraft
I have a Chevrolet 2500HD diesel. I pull a 36 foot 15,000 lb 5th wheel. I get anywhere from 11 to 14 mpg depending on the terrain. I have made some modifications with computer chips and exhaust upgrades. I have found that my mileage did not change much, but I have more power. I usually drive between 60 and 65 on the interstate. Best of luck and welcome to the forum.
I have been thinking the same about the diesel prices. All I can figure is that they are hitting us pickup drivers. I have found the diesel is cheaper in rural areas at the truck stops. I paid thirty cents cheaper in rural GA than I pay around Atlanta. Go figure that!!!!
Butch
Fuel mileage is a subject that has many variables, speed, weather, weight, location, driver, and equipment. When we had our 5th wheel-truck combo, fuel mileage was at best just shy of 10 mpg at 9.86. We had a 2000 Ford 4x2 F-250 super-cab w/ 8 foot box, single rear wheel, w/ a v-10 gas engine, a 4R100 transmission, with a rear gear ratio of 3.73 posi . We were towing a model 3520 (36 foot) 1997 Jayco Designer- two slide unit that was at the tow vehicle's tow limit, 14,500 lbs. The truck, itself, would obtain a fuel mileage 16 mpg over the road. The truck was equipped with a roll-up " Pace Edwards " tonneau cover.
We now have a 2003, 36 foot, Holiday Rambler Vacationer w/ a workhorse chassis. The workhorse chassis has a 8.1 liter, 496 cu in, v-8 gas engine rated at 340 hp, an Allison 5 speed transmission, and a rear gear ratio of 5.38. We tow, w/ a tow dolly, a Hyundai Elantra, at a total weight of just under 4,000 lbs. Total weight of 26,000 lbs. The fuel mileage varies between 6.5 to 7.8 mpg, sure wish the fuel mileage was better, but in speaking to others, the mpg figure, seems to be about the same.
camperdad18201
We have a 31 ft fleetwood pace arrow motorhome w/454 chevy gas engine. We get around 10-12 miles per gallon avg, and I don't like to putt up hills smile.gif smile.gif Hope this helps
deerslayer
I own a 30ft nomad about 8500lbs pull with 3500 dulley 454 gas burner went to the moutains last week got about 10 11 mpg had my foot in most of the way 70 75 mph
oldcutup
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We just purchesed our 36' Dolphin last year. We could not be happier. The rig has a chevy vortec engine with a 5 speed Allison transmission. It by far is the sweetest running MH I have ever owned. Our tow is a small 2 dr hatchback and the MH dose'nt know it's back there.
The average MPG is 7.5 to 8.0. Can't complain about that with all of the reserved power this Work horse Chassis has. The five speed transmission reves the engine around 2200 rpm at 67MPH.
I can't speak to the fithwheel portion of your question. I had a one ton dually under a truck camper and it wouldnot pass too many stations.

Happy camping Oldcutup
Leezerman
I have a GMC 2500hd 6.0 4x4 with 4.10 axels. I pull a 27 ft Aljo fifth wheel coming in at 7500 to 8000lbs loaded. Just ran up to the mountains last weekend for some boondocking and averaged about 10mpg but it should improve some ( unsure.gif ) as I only have 2500 miles on the truck.
oldcutup
Comparing apples and oranges

Just a few additional thoughts about your dilemma of truck or MH, diesel or gas.

The first thought is that the initial purchase would put the diesel in a more costly category. You will pay 10K to 15K more for a diesel equipped unit. The cost of diesel fuel is more and the service factor is more.
I have had reports of a diesel equipped MH will average 12 to 15 MPG.
You would have to drive a lot of miles to make up the difference. Diesel engines are meant to be driven long and hard distances.

A diesel truck (dually) will cost a bundle if itís equipped properly. You should also have a need for a 40K pickup setting in your driveway. The same thing applies having a MH lying around your yard.
We have considered both options of partial-full timing, but my wife likes the fact that you can refill our coffee cups and serve up lunch as we go down the highway. Also, you have to stop to use the restroom. That in itself would make the wife stay at home. Not part of the plan!

I also see setting up a 5th-wheel as a lot of trouble. If you are going to be in one spot for a long time, then a 5th-wheel may be the way to go.

When you are selecting a way of life you wish to accomplish when hitting the road. There are other things to consider besides gas mileage. There are several books you can purchase to help you make that decision.
Good luck, oldcutup
jojolima
QUOTE(oldcutup @ Oct 20 2006, 11:23 AM) *

Comparing apples and oranges

Just a few additional thoughts about your dilemma of truck or MH, diesel or gas.

The first thought is that the initial purchase would put the diesel in a more costly category. You will pay 10K to 15K more for a diesel equipped unit. The cost of diesel fuel is more and the service factor is more.
I have had reports of a diesel equipped MH will average 12 to 15 MPG.
You would have to drive a lot of miles to make up the difference. Diesel engines are meant to be driven long and hard distances.

A diesel truck (dually) will cost a bundle if itís equipped properly. You should also have a need for a 40K pickup setting in your driveway. The same thing applies having a MH lying around your yard.
We have considered both options of partial-full timing, but my wife likes the fact that you can refill our coffee cups and serve up lunch as we go down the highway. Also, you have to stop to use the restroom. That in itself would make the wife stay at home. Not part of the plan!

I also see setting up a 5th-wheel as a lot of trouble. If you are going to be in one spot for a long time, then a 5th-wheel may be the way to go.

When you are selecting a way of life you wish to accomplish when hitting the road. There are other things to consider besides gas mileage. There are several books you can purchase to help you make that decision.
Good luck, oldcutup
jas&nik
I have had 2 trucks pull the same 35 ft fifth wheel first was a 09 gmc 2500 hd with 6.0 gas. It pulled ok in Kansas were it is flat with some small hills got about 6-8 mpg at 65mph. Just depended on the wind there are times we fight high winds out here. My current truck is 11 gmc diesel. We just returned from Colorado last week and averaged 10-11 mpg and I try to run 65-70 when I can
chowhound
We started out in a 31 ft winnebago with the ford v-10 genrally got between 9.5 and 10.5 mpg. the best ever was 11.6 mpg with a tail wind. When we added a Jeep Liberty tow vehicle the mpg dropped a little more than 10% to between 6.5 and 7.8. We now have a 38' Tiffin with the Cummins 6.7 L diesel pulling the same Jeep liberty mpg is between 8.5 and 9.0.

I also have a dodge 2500 Mega cab with the smaller cummins 5.9 L engine. empty, mpg was about 15 to 16 in city and 18 to 19 on highway. I put the complete Banks Power system on the truck from ram air to 4" pipes front to back. Now have a big boost in mpg to 18 city and a little over 20 on highway when empty. When pulling a 21' Triton on the highway and dialing up the power boost a little mpg runs between 16 and 17 mpg. I would highly reccommend you consider the banks system. Now I am waiting and considering one for the new Tiffin.
VtLee
We have a '97 Ford F-250 that has been used only for camping. The engine is 7.3 liters with a 5 speed standard shift. We started out with a 10ft. truck camper and averaged 14 mpg. We then switched to a 30ft. Jayco Eagle 5th. wheel which weighed around 10,000 lbs. and we averaged 11 mpg. Last year we bought a 27.5 ft. Cougar 5th wheel which is around 8,000 lbs. and more aerodynamic. My MPG has been pretty consistent at around 13, depending more on speed than anything else. I try not to go over 65 mph. I would assume that the newer trucks would get better mileage. Since 2007 the new diesel fuel formulation is not as powerful.
Tallboy
Have a used 2000 Kenworth T-600. Was modified to carry two motorcycles. That was the main reason for getting it. Has a 430 hp diesel enigne. Pulls a 15,900 pound trailer. Truck gets 8.5 to 9.5 mpg.

Have have since sold the motorcycles and have a car. Don't tow it behind the trailer since there are so many states where it's illegal to we'd be to long anyway.

Have thought about selling the truck and getting a 2011 or newer Dodge, Chevy, GMC, or Ford with the new and improved engine, but not sure it will pull the trailer up a 7% grade at the speed limit. Which I can do now.
Meyer Camping
Our 2002 GMC Yukon XL 2500 has the 8.1 liter engine and tows 12,000 pounds so it handles our 7,400 pound (empty) with no problems. Over the last 37,000 miles we have averaged 9.93 mpg. over that period. For us, the biggest factor is speed. I try to keep the speed at 60 when pulling the trailer since our mileage can drop to 6.5 when pushing hard.
vincee
I think the moral of the whole story is that you can expect to get between 8 to 10 miles per gallon humming along between 60 and 65mph, and it does not matter what combination of rig you run. I confirm this with my 31ft Allegro with the V10 Ford. For trips longer than a weekend outing (which is going to be between 75 to 150 miles from home), I just use an average of 8mpg for my trip budgeting purpose. This has worked well for my wife and I and we gererally have a little extra $$ left over from fuel costs. We also plan time based on the 60-65mph base for stops and arrival times etc.
As other posts have pointed out, unless you want to be destained only to the campground, you have to tow something. The question is then what do you want to drive day in and day out when you are not camping? We also like the idea of tooling down the two lane with the abiltiy to have sandwiches and snacks as we make time to our destination.
pgfamily
We have a 2011 F350 4x4 with the 6.7 diesel, and tow a 32' jayco weighing 10000lbs. We get about 12mpg doing about 70mph. I'm told that when I get a few more miles on the truck, I'll start getting a few more mpg's too, so I'm happy.
KETTERMN
QUOTE(mstennmom @ Oct 11 2006, 09:56 PM) *

biggrin.gif We are looking to purchase another RV. We did own a RV for a year or so but sold it about 2 years back. I would like to compare the mileage of different RVs all classes and Trucks used to pull trailers. I would like as many posts as possible so I and others can use it to help determine the best purchase for our use. Could you please describe the RV if it is deisel or unleaded, size, year, make, model etc. and if you tow a vehicle behind or same type Truck information used to pull the brief trailer and trailer description and post what your mileage is on the road or used for towing. I am really confused about what type of motorhome to purchase and unfortunately, for us the mileage is something for us to consider. I thought instead of looking for site after site to get this information which is actually pretty difficult to find, I would ask for the campers to post this information and then we could review this to help us determine which type of camper to purchase. I will not use this information for any other reason and I really don't ask for anyone to leave other information but if they would like to give other relavant info like if they would recommend the camper or vehicle then I would appreciate that as well. I think that this information would be extremely helpful to others out there looking at this information in relation to purchasing a new camper. Thanks for your help.



We have 38 ft 5th wheel with 5 slides outs, fulley loaded, pulling with 1998 F350 truck 6.0 engine we get right at 12 miles to the gallon on gas. We like the fact of droping the home and driving the truck where we need to go after set up.It is easer for us with big family.Hope this helps.
RFCN2
We have a 42' country coach affinity with tag. Weight is something like 40,000 lbs. With Saturn tow we get around 7-8 mpg average. Some friends of ours have a 35' Bounder DP and just got back from 8,000 mile trip. They averaged 9.6 mpg towing an Explorer. IMHO these are about the average you can expect. I usually keep my hwy speed about 62.
DavyD
I have a 30 foot Class "C" Motorhome with a 6.8 liter Ford V-10 engine. In addition, I pull a Saturn Vue SUV. I usually average 7 to 8 miles per gallon in a year that I usually travel around 12,000 miles. One more variable that I will throw in is that I will try to avoid interstate highways and travel on US highways when possible to get to see more of the cities and towns as opposed to driving around them.
campinggirl1964
Greetings:

Tow vehicle: 2000 Ford F350, 7.3l turbo diesel
RV: 2006 Silverback 33LBHTS, 35', 10,500 lbs dry

2 recent trips this year:
Ontario - Florida: averaged 11.6 MPG for entire trip
Ontario - Massachusetts - Ohio: averaged 12.0 MPG

Highway speed is typically 60 - 62 MPH
Tom
I wonder if the original poster ever came back to read the replys?
campinggirl1964
QUOTE(Tom @ Aug 8 2011, 08:13 PM) *

I wonder if the original poster ever came back to read the replys?



I just realized his post was from 2006....hopefully he made his decision long ago, however, it's interesting to see the different comparisons! cool.gif
chowhound
The original post may have been from 2006, but they have had more replies in the last 30 days than the the original. Although I feel somewht responible for the "rebirth" of this thread, I found it interesting that the everyones results were pretty consistant, despite 5 years of technology advances.
vincee
QUOTE(chowhound @ Aug 11 2011, 07:13 PM) *

The original post may have been from 2006, but they have had more replies in the last 30 days than the the original. Although I feel somewht responible for the "rebirth" of this thread, I found it interesting that the everyones results were pretty consistant, despite 5 years of technology advances.


chowhound I think the MPG has not changed that much because the advances that you would think modern technology has given us is being eaten up with more weight and features. My
Allegro is a 2000, and in some ways looks like it is ancient compared to how rigs are being built today. More slide outs, tile floors (heavy), bigger fridges, more stowage space to load up on alot junk probably not needed, to name just a few. I also think that you can only do so much because of the aerodynamics and shear size of of todays RV's. When I think of it though, we have had some improvements. Had a friend back in the 80's with a nice size class C. It had a Chevy 454 in it. His average mileage back and forth from WNY to Florida several times a year was in the 3-4 MPG! ranges. If that was still the case today, I would think alot of us would find another way to enjoy the great outdoors and the splendor this country holds for us.
elkhntr4evr
I have not yet purchased an RV and am looking at buying a Diesel Pusher, so I appreciate everyones comments to the person that asked questions concerning Motorhomes to Travel trailers, and Fifth wheels. I plan on getting mine when I return from Afghanistan within a few months. I have about two more years until I retire, and love being in the outdoors, and traveling. I love to drive. I am coming back to Fort Hood, TX so if anyone knows of any good deals there and they don't mind helping out a soon to be retiree, it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for all of your great information even though it was back in 2011, it was very helpful.
vincee
QUOTE(elkhntr4evr @ Apr 1 2012, 04:58 AM) *

I have not yet purchased an RV and am looking at buying a Diesel Pusher, so I appreciate everyones comments to the person that asked questions concerning Motorhomes to Travel trailers, and Fifth wheels. I plan on getting mine when I return from Afghanistan within a few months. I have about two more years until I retire, and love being in the outdoors, and traveling. I love to drive. I am coming back to Fort Hood, TX so if anyone knows of any good deals there and they don't mind helping out a soon to be retiree, it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for all of your great information even though it was back in 2011, it was very helpful.


First off, Thank You for your service. My son served 3 tours in Iraq and 1 in Afghanistan with the Rangers.

When comparing type of RV to get into, the one basic premise is that you will be towing something. Pick up towing a trailer or fifth wheel, motor home, either class C or A eventually you will be towing either a car on a dolly or flat towing a car behind you. If you are a pick up type of guy then the fifth wheel will give you by far the most room and floor plan options. Trailers are more econimiacal, but I have seen some that are as nice as fancy class A motor homes. I prefer the class A motor home {bus type) because of the convenience of having your living space with you as you go down the road. Need to go the the bathroom while on the highway, just pull over and use yours. Want a snack to a full cooked meal while traveling, the kitchen is right there. Pull into a campground after dark, just back in, plug in your electric and hook up the water, set your auto leveling jacks on auto and in about 10 mins. your set for at least the evening. Shop around, get as much info from dealers and users and you will do fine. Good Luck with your deployment and future RV'ing!
Kirk
Welcome aboard, Elkhunter! It is good to have you here. There are a lot of veterans in the group. I am Viet Nam era and exNavy. We have three sons all exArmy with our youngest recently retired from 24 years service.

On the RV choice, there is a lot to consider. I think that you might get more help if you were to also read the forums of the Escapee's RV Club.
KentuckyCampin
I have a 2011 30' jayco jayflight swift and tow it with a 2011 Chevy silverado 2500 hd. It has the 6.0 gas engine w/6spd auto tranny. Last year I kept track of all the mileage just to see what I got, and it is right around 10-11 mpg. We towed from KY to FL last fall and thats what I got down and back as well. I drive this truck as my daily driver and only get about 14 mpg, so a 3 or 4 mpg drop towing a trailer wasnt too bad.
Bud and Donna
QUOTE(campinggirl1964 @ Aug 6 2011, 07:15 AM) *

Greetings:

Tow vehicle: 2000 Ford F350, 7.3l turbo diesel
RV: 2006 Silverback 33LBHTS, 35', 10,500 lbs dry

2 recent trips this year:
Ontario - Florida: averaged 11.6 MPG for entire trip
Ontario - Massachusetts - Ohio: averaged 12.0 MPG

Highway speed is typically 60 - 62 MPH

Bud and Donna
We are seniors who used to have motorhomes but dropped out and have been working .... Would like to be able to go back into Rv ng before we are too old to do anything. We know we want a motorhome, as like to be able to bake, cook, etc on the road. However are concerned about cost, mpg, right choice for this stage of our lives. I'm thinking 28 ft class c for economy, small foot print that can park just about anywhere - my hubby is thinking diesel, and large, class a...... Any advise from those that are there? We are relatively low income so need to make the wisest decision possible and from reading the forum, it sounds like mpg is still in the 8mpg level. Is there anything new in this area or is that still true? Are there any really good choices for this stage of our lives or anything to steer clear of?

Thanks for any nut you may be able to give!
pianotuna
Hi,

How about a 30 foot class A? It may have better fuel economy than a class C and the Ford v-10 would do about 10 mpg. If going to diesel on a sprinter chassis that could be 15 mpg--but the upfront costs are so much higher that there are no real savings over the life of the RV.
vincee
A 28ft class C is not going to get any better mileage than a smaller class A gas and the footprint is going to be about the same too. Many women like C's because they drive somewhat like a Ford van. When my wife and I bought our 32ft class A she too really wanted a smaller C because she thought she would not be able to drive the higher profile body that the A provides. Five years later, she wouldn't think of anything but a class A, she often takes our rig out on sisters weekends touring around the New York State Finger Lakes region of wineries. As far as cost goes, there are a ton of older A's out there with low mileage (not always a true indicator of use because some are parked in campgrounds for the season or extended periods of time) and little wear and tear for not alot of money, especially if you forgo options like slide outs. Good luck on your quest and keep us informed how you make out and fills us in when the adventures start again.
Bud and Donna
QUOTE(pianotuna @ Jun 27 2012, 06:33 AM) *

Hi,

How about a 30 foot class A? It may have better fuel economy than a class C and the Ford v-10 would do about 10 mpg. If going to diesel on a sprinter chassis that could be 15 mpg--but the upfront costs are so much higher that there are no real savings over the life of the RV.


Thank you for the info - you bring up good points that we will consider. We had ruled out diesels just because of the cost. I guess I'd hoped for better than 10 Mpg.... We'd had a truck & camper with 17 mpg but are too old to climb over the cab etc at this time..... And don't want to go back to a 5th wheel & the hassles as didn't go out because of the hassles so have least come to the conclusion we are MH people.... Just a bit scared of making a mistake at this point of our lives. smile.gif
Bud and Donna
QUOTE(vincee @ Jun 27 2012, 08:45 AM) *

A 28ft class C is not going to get any better mileage than a smaller class A gas and the footprint is going to be about the same too. Many women like C's because they drive somewhat like a Ford van. When my wife and I bought our 32ft class A she too really wanted a smaller C because she thought she would not be able to drive the higher profile body that the A provides. Five years later, she wouldn't think of anything but a class A, she often takes our rig out on sisters weekends touring around the New York State Finger Lakes region of wineries. As far as cost goes, there are a ton of older A's out there with low mileage (not always a true indicator of use because some are parked in campgrounds for the season or extended periods of time) and little wear and tear for not alot of money, especially if you forgo options like slide outs. Good luck on your quest and keep us informed how you make out and fills us in when the adventures start again.


Thank you for the input - I've driven a 30 ft class a befor just thinking of being able to use it more often for things like overnight visits to the kids, etc and most of all gas mileage. As funds are limited - want to be able to use and enjoy... Not just park. smile.gif
vincee
Unless you guys go with a Sprinter type class B (large conversion van) you are going to be hard pressed to get any kind of mileage over 10mpg. A side note, I have gotton as high as 11.92mpg on my 32ft A by taking two lane roads and driving at a leisurely pace. As far as not wanting to make a mistake, if you look, touch, fiddle and poke and talk, talk, talk, you'll be ok. Your not new to RV'ing so you already are ahead of the curve in knowing what to look for, your needs and likes etc. Go and do it (like the Nike ad) take a chance and you may surprise yourself on how much you do know and how good your judgement is, This darn Beautiful country of ours is out there with a large Open sign waiting for your arrival! Enjoy and good luck.
Bud and Donna
QUOTE(vincee @ Jun 30 2012, 07:03 AM) *

Unless you guys go with a Sprinter type class B (large conversion van) you are going to be hard pressed to get any kind of mileage over 10mpg. A side note, I have gotton as high as 11.92mpg on my 32ft A by taking two lane roads and driving at a leisurely pace. As far as not wanting to make a mistake, if you look, touch, fiddle and poke and talk, talk, talk, you'll be ok. Your not new to RV'ing so you already are ahead of the curve in knowing what to look for, your needs and likes etc. Go and do it (like the Nike ad) take a chance and you may surprise yourself on how much you do know and how good your judgement is, This darn Beautiful country of ours is out there with a large Open sign waiting for your arrival! Enjoy and good luck.


We may have found the one, a 2000 Bounder 31W with 14k miles. It is on a Ford V10 and very clean, good response & ride. They want $27k for it... Say it should get 10-12 mpg if you use cruise control & good judgement. Am excited & scared....
Bud in Florida
Great that you are excited Bud and Donna. If you buy used it is hard to make a mistake. You can usually get most of your money back if you take care of the unit. I have a 36 foot Damon on a Ford chassis and get around 8 to 8.5 even when towing my car. My solution to the high gas prices is to stay places longer thereby spreading the fuel cost over a longer time. Also, you can save with discount camping places like Passport America, and State and National parks. When you add it all up, traveling by RV is still not a bad deal.
Suppose you went on a week long trip 1000 miles from your home. If you take your RV the gas RT would be about 235 gals @ $3.25 = $763. If you went by car you would use say 90 gal of gas @ $3.25 or $260. Then lets say you spend $25 a night in camping fees or $175, but you would have to spend $75 for motel rooms in a nice place or $525. Plus meals. Eating out vs cooking at the campground that could be a savings of $200. So the RV trip was $763 + $175 = $938 and the trip by car was $785 and you have an additional savings on food so both trips cost about the same and you have your own bed!!!
Wind Runner
QUOTE(elkhntr4evr @ Apr 1 2012, 03:58 AM) *
I am coming back to Fort Hood, TX so if anyone knows of any good deals there and they don't mind helping out a soon to be retiree, it would be greatly appreciated.

You should be just about ready to rotate home now, so my recommendation for the Ft. Hood area is to investigate units in the retirement areas of Arizona. Dry climate, so fewer corrosion problems. A used, good condition low-milage unit will suffer less depreciation than new, at the cost of spending time and money for some inevitable repairs. Even brand-new units will need some repairs under warranty; it just goes with the territory.

Again, thanks for your service. Enjoy your time at home.
jmcf46
I pulled a 6900 lb 5th wheeler to Maine and averaged 11 mpg with a high of 13 mpg and low of 10 mpg. The truck is a 1/2 ton toyota 5.7l tundra. It pulled just fine even in moderate upgrades. I chose the 26sab 5th wheeler since it is rated for a 1/2 ton. If I had a 3/4 ton might have pulled easier with better milage.
Wydglide
2004 Dodge Durango, 5.7L Hemi.
2009 30ft Keystone Hideout. Approx. 7,000 loaded.
Wind at my back avg. 11.5 mpg.
Head wind as low as 7.5 mpg.
Durango tows great with the 365 hp Hemi.
John S.
I have owned 6 different RVs and lots of different trucks and jeeps. The milage on an RV is not the issue really. Your roads will determine that. You go to the mountains or drive in them you are going to get worse mileage. In the scope of things you just drive there and park and drive the tow vehicle or the toad around more miles than you drive. If you are driving lots of miles than it makes a difference. I put on over 30,000 miles a year on my motorhome but most MHs and trailers are lucky to get 5000 miles a year on them. If you got 10 miles to the gallon or 8 miles to the gallon that means it will be the difference of 125 gallons of fuel over the course of the year. you are talking a difference of 437 dollars a year. If that is a factor in your decision to RV then I would not bother and get a fuel efficient car and stay in a hotel. It is cheaper to do that than to RV. If you are driving a lot of miles then milage might factor in a bit more but then other things factor in more.
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