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Date of Stay:

This camping experience is certainly not for everyone. The main (only?) reason to camp here is the hot springs. The first thing to be aware of is that you will want to arrive with all of the fresh water that you will need for your stay. The water all comes from the hot springs source. The factors that make it great for soaking, make it not so great for putting into your rig. It is high in mineral content and alkaline, giving it a strong laxative effect. The alkalinity also quickly corrodes plumbing and fixtures. So, the best bet is to bring all of the water you will need. This used to be a county park but fell into disrepair. It is now run by a conservancy that has improved the springs considerably, but not so much the campground. The campground is a not overly attractive field with some long term and some trashed camping units, along with folks like us visiting for a few days. So do it for the water and not for the view. Check in is at the hot springs across the street from the campground and is open 24 hours every day. We had 30 amp hookup and used our tank water only for drinking and cooking. Other than that we used the bath house. There is no cell service. The campground does have WiFi for a fee, but it is quite expensive, so we did not use it. You can also pick up slow internet at the clubhouse in the campground. Satellite is not a problem. The hot springs are described below. The price is certainly right since use of the hot springs, typically $7 per person per day, comes with camping. We would definitely come back to enjoy the hot springs for a few days.

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The rate reflects 50% discount with a Senior Pass. There is really no other way to describe this campground other than as a large parking lot with some spectacular views. It is one of three campgrounds in the Furnace Creek area of Death Valley. Furnace Creek CG takes reservations and is almost always full during prime season. Texas Springs is a no-generator CG and only suitable for tenting or small rigs. During our visit, even though it was a holiday period, the campground was less than 10% full, so we had only one close neighbor. The generator hours are quiet generous from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. There are restrooms and a dump station in the campground. We had a very strong 3g signal on our Verizon phones and MiFi. No problem with voice, but internet was only sufficient to get a few emails. The adjacent Furnace Creek Ranch, with lodging, restaurants, and store has WiFi for a fee; we did not use it as it is very expensive. Satellite is not a problem since there are no trees.

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This is our go-to park in the Bakersfield area. It is good staging for heading over Tehachapi pass. Even though our rig is short enough to fit in a smaller site, we chose to pay more and stay in the larger rig sites farther away from the Highway. You are assigned a site. Unfortunately, we were assigned a site right in front of the restrooms with a very bright light. Since we were there for only one night, we accepted it, but would prefer a site farther afield with less light and noise. You are encouraged to pick the oranges and they are delicious. The trees are short, so no problem with satellite. The WiFi here actually works well, a nice change from most RV parks. Our Verizon Data and voice also worked well. The laundry work well and not expensive. The weight room is not much, with equipment out of order.

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There are not a lot of campgrounds along Interstate 5, between the Bay Area and Los Angeles area; this is one of the few. It is an OK place to spend the night, certainly not a destination campground. It is very close to the Interstate. There is some highway noise, but not too bad for a night. We were assigned a site. There had been rain so lots of standing water and mud in the site, not ideal for setting up. The sites are close and not overly attractive. The managers/owners are very pleasant and helpful. All utilities were good. WiFi was terrible and not worth getting the code, but our Verizon MiFi worked well. Satellite was not a problem. It is very, very bright at night, with a lot of bright lights, something we hate. Not really the Park's fault, but rigs came in at all hours of the night, making sleeping difficult. If we needed a place to stay in the area, we would stay here again for a night, but would not look forward to it.

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This is a former State Park that was taken over by the city of Colusa when it was to be closed by the State a few years ago. Thanks to the city it was saved. We gave it a positive review when we stayed here a few years ago. Some things have changed and not for the positive. One glaring change is the cost to stay. Because of the weather, we chose an electric site rather than dry camping. By chance we chose a site with 50 amps. I was shocked when I went up to pay and saw that the rate was $45 for a 50 amp electric and water-no sewer! That is ridiculous! We had planned on staying four nights, but just stayed two to visit the wildlife refuges in the area. The park is also clearly deteriorating. The camp host was very friendly, but his site, which is the first thing you see when you enter the park, is totally trashed. Also, there is some type of very long-term setup in the dry camping area of the park that is also very trashy. There were lots of feral cats and free-range dogs around. Unfortunately, it no longer had that nice friendly and safe feel to it. For the electric sites, about the longest rig that could get in would be 28 feet. Our Verizon voice and data worked well. We had to use our small portable dish for satellite because of the tree cover. Because of the cost and the feel, we would likely not stay here again.

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We were very pleasantly surprised at how nice this campground was. It was about 10 minutes outside of Corning, but well worth the drive, in our view, to avoid staying in the very crowded parks in the town. The park is large and, when we were there, was not very crowded. It is nicely landscaped with good site separation. Check-in was efficient, if not very friendly. The campground is well back from the gas station in front with many semi-trucks, and we took a site as far back in the campground as we could, so little truck or highway noise. There are some type of industries around the park that did generate some deep rumbling noise at night that was not pleasant, but was tolerable. The sites are gravel and there is no picnic table, but, even though it rained heavily during our stay, they were not muddy. Unfortunately there are many, many bright lights. There are LED lights that are bright and piercing, so that we had to put up our blackout shades. We were not able to get their WiFi at our site. Our Verizon voice and data were good. There was not a problem with trees in getting satellite. This would not be a destination park, but was good for visiting Corning for a couple of days.

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The rate is based on a weekly stay, with a cash discount, for a river-front site. The campground is very pretty, particularly the river-front sites, with a beautiful green lawn. The grounds are very well landscaped and maintained. Spacing is generous. The campground is about 15 minutes south of Redding and is right along the Interstate. Therein lies the problem. The sound of the Interstate is very loud throughout the park. It was tolerable during the winter when we had all the windows closed, but we would not stay here during the summer when we wanted to be outside a lot or have windows open. The park has WiFi, but we could not get a good signal from the one centrally located antenna. Our Verizon voice and data worked well. All utilities were good. The spaces are large and paved. They have a large clean laundry, but it is very expensive at $3.25 each for wash and dry. We have never paid that much before. When we checked in, the lady noticed our bicycles and told us to make for sure and lock them as they had had bicycle thefts. So be aware. We did lock our bikes as we always do, but had no problems of any kind. Overall, we enjoyed our stay. We would stay again during the winter but not during the summer because of the freeway noise.

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We stayed here for two months while visiting the area. The rate reflects a monthly rate with electricity billed separately. Some have noted difficulty in locating the CG; note that the actual address is Central Point, even though the CG is next to Gold Hill, about 10 miles north of Medford. The low rating is because we had two bicycles stolen. In our 11 years of full-time we had never had anything stolen. At this KOA, during the night, someone cut the lock and took the two expensive bikes. In talking with other campers, this was not the only case of theft in the park, including bicycles. Most of the park is long-term campers. Nothing wrong with that, but there are some pretty shady looking folks around. Also, Gold Hill has a lot of street people. We never felt completely safe there. The owners are mostly absent. The park is run by workcampers that are very nice, but it has more of a feel of a trailer park than a KOA. So, if you do stay there, lock and protect your stuff. There is some road noise since the CG is right off of Interstate. It was OK in the winter when we had everything closed. The CG is fairly easy to get into and get around. Utilities were good, but sometimes the trash dumpsters were overflowing. Our Verizon voice and data worked well. We were able to get satellite using our portable dish. The State Park just a few miles away is much nicer, has full hookups and is cheaper. We would certainly stay there rather than this Gold Hill KOA.

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The rate reflects a 50% federal senior pass discount. This is a National Forest Service campground managed by Thousand Trails Management Services. It is on the northwest shore of Kachess Lake in Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Only a very few sites have lake views. It is about six miles off of I-90 on good, paved, but curvy, roads. It is heavily wooded, but some sites are somewhat open. Most sites are reservable, but about 40 sites are first-come. There is no dump station. There is water at faucets throughout the campground, but without threads, and we were prohibited from filling our tanks as it "drained their reserves." There is a dump at Easton State Park, about 13 miles away. There was a booth at the entrance with about the most unwelcoming "host" we have encountered in our 11 years of full-timing. The sites are fairly well-spaced with vegetation for visual separation. Be aware that some pull-through sites are often severely curved so that the stated length is somewhat deceptive. Also there are many "double sites" that cost twice as much, are not any different than the single sites, but they allow two camping units. The sites have picnic tables and fire pits with grills. We had very limited to no Verizon cell or data, even with our roof-top antenna and amplifier. We could get a good signal at the boat ramp. We were not able to get satellite, even with our portable dish, because of tree cover. The campground is about an hour from Seattle and is heavily used, particularly on weekends and holidays - lots of families and kids, so not that peaceful. The lake is the main feature here with a swimming beach. We had a good stay but the holiday weekend was very crowded and somewhat noisy. We would stay here again for an overnight or two, but because of limited activities this would not be a destination campground for us.

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The rate noted is for a 50 amp hook-up site. It does not include the required daily entry fee or purchase, as we did, of an annual pass for motorhome and towed vehicle for $43 per year. The campground is a ways from the river, so it is not really a feature. The main attraction is a pond where people, primarily kids, can get in the water. There were lots of kids around. The campground is fairly open with some trees for shade and is pleasant. Pleasant, unless it rains, which it did a lot during our visit. Then is becomes pretty mucky. We had fairly good Verizon voice and data. We were able to get satellite at our site using our portable dish. A lot of folks, as we did, use this campground as a base to visit nearby Morehead/Fargo, a 20 minute drive away. We would stay here again.

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This review is for the Bowl and Pitcher campground. The rate and review are for the non-hookup, dry camping section of the park. The rate does not include the $8 reservation fee or the $5 non-resident fee to bring the cost to over $33 per night (four nights camping) for a parking spot in a dirt field - far too expensive. The hook-up sites are much nicer, but book up early. The non-hookup sites are located next to the entry road with lots of traffic. The sites are laid out in a haphazard order and really are nothing but vaguely defined spaces in the dirt, spaces fairly close together and with nothing for visual separation. There is nothing remotely pleasant about it. As vehicles idle while waiting in line for the entry booth the campground has the feel of a freeway toll booth. To add injury to insult, there was a very, very bright light on the side of the restrooms that bathed the campground in a harsh bright light all night long. It had both train and plane sounds. We were able to get satellite with our portable dish and Verizon data and voice were strong. It is a bit of a trip through city traffic to get here from Interstate. Check the park web site or reservation e-mail for the best route as there are closed roads on the route that your GPS will take you. We will not be returning to this campground.

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The rate reflects a 50% Federal Senior Pass discount. The standard rate of $20 is quite high for a campground where the only services are trash and pit toilets. There is water with a hand pump, so not suitable for filling a tank. There is no dump station. So, you will want to arrive with fresh water and empty waste tanks. Is is important to emphasize that this campground is not suitable for big rigs. The interior roads are very narrow and the sites short. Also, during our visit there were fairly large branches extended over the roadway, so it is not suitable for high-profile vehicles unless you don't mind some potential scratches. By the time we discovered this, we were fairly committed on a one-way road and decided to go with the potential scrapes. Many of the sites are tent only. About half of the sites are reservable. We arrived without reservations on a Thursday at about 11, and had about three sites to choose from. The sites are paved and many are well separated with thick vegetation for visual separation. The campground is in a valley, so you will not see sun very early in the morning and it will go down about 4 or so in the summer. It was very quiet and dark at night. The campground is about 15 minutes outside of Coeur d'Alene. It feels very isolated. There was no camp host and some campers looked like they were living here. We had some slight concern about leaving our motorhome here as we visited the town, but fortunately, we had no problems. We were able to get a good Verizon signal for voice and data. The campground is certainly much less expensive than the commercial campgrounds in the area.

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The best way to summarize this campground is "funky." The full-hookup sites are in an open field and close together. They look to be mostly long-term stays. We chose to stay in the electric/water sites that are not as closely spaced. There is a dump station. About five of these sites are in the open with 30 amp electric. Most are in a wooded area with very unlevel sites with only 20 amp service. You check in at the restaurant. The ladies there were very nice but had no clue of 20 versus 30 amp power. We made reservations, but that was not really necessary, as there were many spaces available. Since we were in the field area, we were able to get satellite with our roof-top dish. Verizon signal was amazingly strong and fast. They do have Internet that was intermediate, sometimes fast and sometimes off. It is far enough away from the Interstate that there was not a lot of traffic noise, but there are train tracks with some train noise, but not bad. Overall it was a pretty quiet, restful stay. This was an OK place to spend the night, but we might try someplace closer in to Missoula.

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The rate is for a dry-camping, no hook-up site, expensive because of out-of-state status. There is fresh water fill, but no dump station and no showers, only pit toilets. It is only a few miles from interstate, but feels worlds away. It is very quiet and is wonderfully dark at night. In the summer it fills on the weekends, but there are usually sites available during the week. A few of the sites are isolated, but most are fairly open. Some are very close and almost "buddy" sites. There is little shade, so we had no problem getting satellite. Verizon voice and data were very strong. It was very quiet at night. We would stay here again.

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The rate is for a dry-camping, no hook-up site, expensive because of out-of-state status. The campground is a bit off the interstate, but on good roads, so not that hard to get to. There is fresh water fill at the dump station.The main attraction here are the caverns, so many are one-night stands. There are few trees in the campground, so plan on sun. Your solar panels will be happy. The spaces are open but well-separated and the views of the surrounding hills are very pleasant. It was wonderfully quiet and dark at night, good sleeping. Generator hours are from 7 am to 10 pm, like it or not. During our visit, no one abused this by running a generator continuously, so not a problem. We were easily able to get satellite with our roof-top dish. Verizon data and voice were sketchy and required our Wilson amp with roof-top antenna. We would certainly stay here again.