BruceandKathyWA

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This is a very popular state park that is hard to get into without reservations in the summer. In the shoulder season and during the winter there are no reservations and it's first come, first served. On nice weekends, it can be hard to get into even during the off-season. We came in on a Thursday afternoon and all the hook-up sites (water and electric only) were already taken, as were the best view sites. Still, we were able to get a site with a nice view of the water and the ferry landing. In my opinion the non-hook-up sites are the best because they have the best views and are the most spacious. Washington State parks now have a tiered fee system at their parks (at least some of them anyway). This means that sites are various prices depending on whether they are deemed to be Premium, View or Economy sites. The best thing about this park is the easy access to the ferry which goes over to the charming Victorian town of Port Townsend. It's an easy walk to the ferry from the campground and the walk-on fares are very reasonable. There is no dump station at Fort Casey, but there are dump stations at Fort Ebey and Deception Pass State Parks and they are free if you've been camping at Fort Casey.

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We've stayed at Salt Creek numerous times. What we love most about it are the beautiful views across the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the easy access to the interesting beach and tide pools. What we like least is how close you are to your neighbors! There are two sections to this campground. Sites #1 to #51 are up on a high exposed bluff. Of those sites, #33 to #39 are pull-through, while #1 to #32 are back-in. Sites #6 to #32 are arranged on terraces so that theoretically every site will have a view. Be aware though that depending on what kind of rig you have you may end up without a view. For example, we stayed in site #17 which put the large front windows of our trailer facing the view (albeit over the top of our truck). If we had taken one of the sites in the upper terrace (#25 to #32) the back of our trailer with its tiny window would have been facing the view. This is because of the direction of the traffic flow. So if in doubt, when making a reservation, ask! We camped during a very stormy few days and so the campground was not crowded and we were able to pick a spot that worked well for us without a reservation. There is another section of the campground that is down closer to the water where sites #52 to #92 are located. These sites are nestled in the woods and some have views, but many do not. They're pretty, but can be dark on rainy or cloudy days and they're not suitable for large rigs. There are no hook-ups in the lower loop.

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First off, you need to know that there are two campgrounds that go by the same name. This review is for the Olympic National Park campground called "Sol Duc Campground". The other campground which is also sometimes called "Sol Duc Campground" is actually owned and operated by the Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort and it is, as the previous reviewer writes, basically just a gravel parking lot with hook-ups. The NPS campground is an entirely different facility! The NPS campground lies along the Sol Duc River in lush old growth rain forest. There are two loops with a total of 82 sites. The roads through the campground are very narrow with tight curves. Although there are some nice large pull-through sites, this campground will appeal mostly to those with smaller rigs, camper vans, truck campers, or tents. Come prepared for rain!

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Set on the west shore of Lake Crescent this campground is pretty but primitive. The prime spots are walk-in tent sites right along the shoreline. These sites make it a snap to launch a kayak or canoe. Almost made me wish we were still tenters! The campground is set in very steep terrain so many of the sites will challenge your leveling skills. There are only a few pull-through sites. Shortly before you get to the campground itself there is a boat launch area and a dump station (for which there is a fee in addition to your camping fee). The park brochure recommends that RVs be no longer than 21' but we saw a few slightly larger rigs that managed OK. Some sites have peek-a-boo views of the lake. Our rate reflects the fact that we have a Senior Access pass.

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This is one of several campgrounds in Olympic National Park. Heart O' the Hills is the nearest campground to Port Angeles and provides easy access to Hurricane Ridge. There are no hook-ups here and the closest dump station would most likely be found in Port Angeles or you can use the one at Fairholme Campground (another NPS campground) on the west end of Lake Crescent. There are restrooms with sinks and flush toilets, but no showers. As with many NPS campgrounds, Heart O' the HIlls is best suited to those with smaller rigs. The park's web site says "RV: Sites for 21 feet, a few for 35 feet." The roads are narrow and of course there are lots of trees. There are some pull through sites available but most sites are back-in and many are very un-level. We camped here for two nights in mid-week and had our choice of spots, selecting a nice pull-through near the restrooms. Even mid-week it's a good idea to get here early though to get the best selection because sites are first-come, first-served. We enjoyed this campground for its beauty, peace and quiet, and good access to Hurricane Ridge and would definitely stay here again. Our rate reflects a 50% discount for having the federal Senior Access Pass.

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We've stayed at Clyde Holliday several times when in this part of Oregon. It's always a pleasant stay. The town of John Day where there are full services is just 6 miles away. Tent and RV sites may not be reserved, but there are two tepees that may be reserved. Sites have just electricity and water but there is a dump station. We appreciate the cottonwoods and other shade trees here when the weather is hot.

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A pretty Oregon State Park is set at the confluence of Spring Creek and the Williamson River. In addition to the campground, there are two day use areas and a horse camp. None of the sites actually have views of the river, but A16 to A22 and B1 to B7 are just a short walk to a trail that goes along the river bank and takes you to the Logging Museum across the highway. We would definitely stay here again.

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This is a nice Forest Service campground spread out along Hat Creek. The sites are large and can accommodate small to medium size rigs. There is at least one restroom with flush toilets and there are pit toilets as well. Water is available in the campground but not at individual sites. There is no dump station. We liked this campground because it was clean, quiet and picturesque. There is a small general store at Old Station, one mile away, and I believe there is also a cafe and gas station there too. The trail head for the Spatter Cones Nature Trail is across the road from the campground. We'd stay here again.

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We stayed here several years ago and remembered it as a good experience. This time we were a little disappointed though, mostly because of the terrible (almost non-existent) Wi-Fi connection. I understand that sometimes the management has no real control over just how good the Internet connectivity will be in a park. However, when we pay $42 (by the time tax was added on), we expect to either get Wi-Fi as promised or to have something taken off our bill. We got neither. The staff seemed indifferent to the inconvenience this caused us and blamed the problem on everything from"corporate" to the weather. Billed as a "resort", this park has all the bells and whistles - gas station, propane, store, laundry, meeting room/lounge, slot machines, dump station, gym, spa, pool, fishing pond, off leash dog area, etc., etc. These are amenities we usually don't really need except for the showers and laundry. On the plus side, this is a very clean park and I really appreciated the spacious and immaculately clean restrooms and showers. We will probably look for somewhere else to stay next time we're in the area.

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We stayed here back in 2011 and nothing much has changed since then. This is a basic USFS campground. The layout is rather confusing and the roads through the campground wind around in an unpredictable way. There are plenty of sites to choose from, whether you want to be down near the creek, out in the open or tucked into a grove of little aspen trees. The beauty of this campground is its proximity to Yosemite National Park and Mono Lake. There is one vault toilet facility (not being kept very clean on our latest visit). There are no hook-ups and no dump station. It now costs $10 to dump at the gas station in Lee Vining. Make sure you come with your own supply of potable water as there is no water available in the campground.

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This is a pretty USFS campground located at 7,000 ft on the eastern side of the Sierras just a short drive from Bridgeport, CA on Twin Lakes Road. Some sites can be reserved through the Recreation.gov website. There are 52 sites for RVs of just about any size. (check with the Visitor's Center in Bridgport if you have any questions on that) and one group site. The roads and parking pads are paved. There are flush toilets but no showers and no hook-ups or dump station. The campground is set in an open pine forest and many of the sites have great views of the Sawtooth Ridge. There is fishing nearby at Upper and Lower Twin Lakes and also in Robinson Creek. Plenty of opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, canoeing, horseback riding, etc. in the area too.

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This is a small "mom and pop" sort of place run by a young couple who appear to be doing extensive updating to the facilities. Don't expect anything fancy - just clean, quiet, friendly and cute. There are about 38 sites arranged on two levels so most sites will have views out to Bridgeport Reservoir and the mountains on the far shore. Before you select a site consider the placement of your windows if you want to take advantage of the views. We had a back-in site (#11) on the upper level, but it put our rear window (the smallest one in our rig) facing the view. A site on the lower level (#21 to #31) would have resulted in our large front windows facing the view. Well, now we know for next time. I really liked the little personal touches in this RV park - the dog wash, the common patio area, the direct access down to the lake shore, and the little amenities in the restrooms. In addition to the RV spaces, the park also offers 4 rental trailers (the Baja looks adorable!) and an area for tent campers. Since this is an older park, the spaces are quite close together and big rigs might have a hard time getting into the park because the entrance requires a rather sharp turn off the highway. This park has a nice laid-back vibe and we would definitely stay here again when in the area.

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Our third or fourth stay here. Easy to get to and yet far enough off the freeway to be quiet. Very clean restrooms and everything is always very neat and tidy. We appreciated the shade trees as it was 90 degrees when we stayed here, even though it was only April!

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This is a convenient stop along I-5 and close to some interesting attractions like the Rogue River corridor and the quaint historic town of Jacksonville. The campground is long and narrow and squeezed in between the highway and the Rogue River. It can be a little noisy with the highway so close by. We've stayed here several times and find the F loop to be the most quiet. There is a nice trail along the river that is easily accessed from the campground.

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As usual, the Oregon Park system didn't let us down! We stayed here 3 nights while attending a molded fiberglass trailer rally. There are two loops for general camping, Dairy Creek East and Dairy Creek West. The east loop is set in a meadow and is open and sunny. The west loop is set among the evergreen trees and would have more shade in the summer but maybe be a little gloomy in the winter. The park also offers a horse camp area, rental cabins, and a group camp area. There are two reservable shelters for group potlucks and the like. Our rally group used the shelter in the Hilltop Day-use Area for a get together. This shelter is roofed but not inclosed. I believe the other shelter is enclosed and has a large fireplace, but I didn't get to see it to confirm that. About the only negative that I can think of for this park is that we had to make our way from I-5 west through Portland to get there!