Doug Atterbury

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  • Review Count 16
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Date of Stay:

This is the finest park we've ever stayed in. It is primarily an up-scale Resort, with 28 log cabins situated on a private lake in deep woodlands near Clearwater, BC. They also have a top-notch RV park, with ten looong paved pull-throughs and eight big gravel back-ins. All sites are dead-level, surrounded by expansive perfect lawns and a few trees. All roads are paved, and all sites are full-service. The one pair of bathroom are great, with free hot showers. Amenities include a single restaurant ($$$), free boat and canoe usage, kids' playground, fishing, covered picnic areas, self-serve BBQs, and hiking trails. No cell service, but the free WiFi signal is strong everywhere (although the satellite Internet connection can be slow). Views of the surrounding mountains are also free. Now the only downside: the location is 13 miles from town, half of it rough pavement, and half graded dirt. It is also up a couple thousand feet of steep climbing, which might heat up your transmission if you haul a big rig. I wouldn't recommend this as an overnight stop if you are traveling through, but if you plan to stay put and enjoy the wonderful amenities in this quiet, beautifully-maintained park, then I highly recommend it.

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This campground appears to be closed. There was a chain across the driveway and a "For Sale" sign up when we passed by.

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Horse Lake is a beautiful lake in central British Columbia, east of 93 Mile House. The address is for Lone Butte, about 10 miles away. This is the only fishing resort and RV park left on Horse Lake. There are no mountain views, and not much hiking, but the fishing can be great. The park is off the road, right on the lake, and very quiet - except for the families staying here. There are new and old log cabins, play areas, tent sites, docks, boat rentals, and a small store. All interior roads are gravel, and the parking pads are either gravel, grass, or dirt. Some sites are shaded, some are in the open. Most are not very level, and the pull-throughs are short and packed together. The bathroom in my area (only cold water) was built of unpainted plywood, but clean. The showers ($) and laundry ($) are very nice. There is some cell service and WiFi is $5 per day.

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We were here three years ago, and it has not gotten any better. Small RV and tent park situated at a local lake attraction. Great for families and party groups, with swimming, putt-putt, play areas, boat rentals, paddle boards, fishing, etc. Don't come if you don't care about those and want to get to sleep at a reasonable hour. My rating is for the physical amenities alone; it wouldn't be fair to give it a 3 or 4 because I don't have kids and want a quiet campsite. Now the park - some pull-throughs, some back-ins, and many tent sites. All are dirt, gravel, or grass, some shaded, some in the open. Site amenities vary; some have full service, others lack sewers, TV, or electricity. My sewer connection was higher than my outlet (the dump station on the way out is excellent). Interior roads are all gravel. While the location is suitably far from highways and railroads, and still near town, locals can overwhelm the lakeside areas and fill the roadsides with parking. Bathrooms are so-so, only cold water is available. Cell reception is good, but WiFi is terrible or non-existent except near the office.

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This is one of three Parks Canada campgrounds a short distance out of Banff town. Tunnel Village 1 has no services, Tunnel Village 2 has electric only, and this, the third, has full hookups. It shares an entrance station with Village 2. This campground has about 400 sites arranged as “lay-byes”, where you pull just off the road, and parallel to it. This means you have some space between sites, but everyone is only a few inches from the road. The overall arrangement is a giant rectangle of eight straight parallel roads, with street lights. Not what you think of for a forest campground, and not very attractive. Most sites are very level, gravel, and most roads are too. There are nine bathrooms (called “washrooms” in Canada, eh?) each with one shower, and they are bright and clean, with stainless steel sinks and Corian counter tops, but no soap. Some sites have very little shade. You do not get to choose a site when you reserve. There is no highway traffic noise, and only distant trains. No cable or Wi-Fi, and cell service can be spotty. Friendly staff. Views from around the campground are of the stunning mountains in the area of Banff.

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This quiet Parks Canada campground is huge – 781 sites. It is arranged as widely-spaced loops, some pull throughs but mostly back-ins. In each loop, neighbors are crowded together rather closely. All pads are level dirt/gravel, served by much-potholed paved roads. There are many bathrooms (called “washrooms” in Canada, eh?) but only one shower facility for the whole park. Our washroom was surprisingly nice, with stainless sinks and Corian counter tops. Clean, with good lighting and hot water. There is no Wi-Fi or cable, and cell service is spotty. The campground is situated in a sparse pine forest, near the highway and two miles from town. The highway is not used at night, so the only noise will be your heater. For those without sewer hookups, the dump station can service eight rigs at a time, but you still might wait at peak times.

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A river runs through this narrow valley, and two roads. Oh, and a mainline railroad. In between sits this very nice Parks Canada campground, handy to most everything in this small town. All sites are level gravel, arranged as pairs of very long pull throughs, where two rigs sit door-to-door. These site pairs are widely spaced out in a deep woods of alpine fir and pine. Interior roads are paved. Electric only service, with a few scattered bathroom or shower buildings. One sewer dump station, but it handles six rigs at a time. Cell service is good, but no Wi-Fi or cable. Then there are the trains. They pass close by the campground, closer to some sites than others, all day and all night. At night, when they blow their horns, it helps to know that almost all the people staying in the up-scale $200/day condos and cabins are also awake.

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If you want a quiet campground, this isn't it. If you are looking for family spots, this is a kid-centric park, and they are everywhere. There is miniature golf, swimming, paddle boats, and a large playground. The lake is open to locals, so they fill the parking lot and line up down the road. Sites are closely-spaced, gravel, off-level side-to-side by several inches, and served by a mostly gravel loop road. Some grass and tables near sites, lots of grass elsewhere in park. There are many tent sites crammed in everywhere. Some sites have shade, most do not. Bathrooms are so-so, one has only cold water. Management is friendly and helpful. There is a small store and short-order kitchen attached to the office. Cell service is good, but Wi-Fi is only available in about half the park. Cable TV includes a couple of US stations.

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This is the very best no-services forest campground. All sites are level gravel, very well spread out in a beautiful deep forest. There are no bad sites here, all are back-in, long enough for any rigs, and large enough for tents or bug screen shelters (you'll need one). Large picnic benches with steel shelf for BBQ. New unheated bathrooms, cleaner than yours at home, with free hot showers and dish washing sinks. Interior roads are oiled gravel to keep dust down. There are lake-front sites, but up a steep bank from the water. There is no dump station, and the nearest is three miles away and $5 Canadian . Campground is very quiet, several miles off the highway, and no powerboats on the lake. No cell service of any kind, this is wild country. The only thing keeping this from being a ten is paved roads and a sewer dump station. E.C. Manning is a very well kept secret, as beautiful as North Cascades National Park.

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This campground is a mile or so further out of town than other parks. They have all gravel roads and generous gravel sites, a smidgen of grass, and some shade trees. They have no phone or cable, and slow Wi-Fi. Verizon gets a weak signal. I can’t get any TV with my antenna. The staff is very friendly and helpful. They have a small store with food, RV parts, fresh-baked goods, clothing, artwork, and trinkets. They give discounts for AAA, Good Sam, and Woodall’s. The bathrooms are average. There is a pool, large grassy play area, three laundry rooms, two shower buildings, swings, horseshoes, cabins, and jeep rentals. There is a western cookout most nights with a big menu. All with a beautiful view of red-rock cliffs from most sites.

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First, the pros: Nice grounds, beautiful lawns, lots of shade trees, and friendly staff, even if they have more rules than campsites. They have full hook-ups, cable and wi-fi. They are closest to the Arches and Canyonlands entrance stations. The cons: Right on the highway (noisy), short 40 foot pull-through sites (you’ll hang over), crowded sites (about eight feet from your neighbor). There is only one toilet in the men’s bathroom for the entire camp, and they can have big crowds of tent campers. When that happens, the garbage cans overflow. Sometimes they close the bathrooms/showers before 10 pm.

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Average state park, right along the marsh bordering (freshwater) Utah Lake. No beach or lakefront access, but park has large marina and boat launches in another area. Can be very windy. Near an airport, but far enough away that light air traffic won’t bother you. Widely-spaced paved sites with all paved roads. No sewer connections, use dump station on your way out. No shade trees at all. Nice paved picnic area at each site, with table, BBQ, and large steel canopy to keep the rain/sun off. Acceptable bathrooms and showers, but only one per 30-site loop. Bath building in B loop not open May 2010, but supposed to be open by June. No Wi-Fi, phone or cable. Save the Internet reservation fees during the winter months and for weekday stays in April and May. We stayed Sunday and Monday nights, and the camp was only 10 percent full. April and May weekends are another matter, the campground host says, with the camp about 80 percent full.

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Very nice state park, one of the nicest we’ve been in. Widely-spaced paved sites with all paved roads, beautiful mowed lawns, many shade trees. Upper loop has more views of the Snake River, lower loop has more trees. Spotless restroom/shower facilities. No Wi-Fi, phone or cable. No sewer connections, use dump station on your way out. There is a new, very nice Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in the park, but it is half the size and not as complete as the one in Baker City, Oregon. Small nearby town has few restaurants or big stores.

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Nice campground, pretty much a large mowed field with gravel roads and widely-spaced gravel sites. One hundred long, wide, level pull-throughs, all with full connections. No Wi-Fi, phone or cable. No shade trees. There is a pool, hot tub, swings, horseshoes, games, etc. The actual Hot Lake is several hundred yards away walking along the gravel country road (watch for locals speeding). Just a bit further is the main railroad between Boise and Portland. Very busy but not loud enough to keep you awake. Bring your binoculars and bird book, as just across the country road is Ladd Marsh wildlife reserve, with ducks, geese, cranes, raptors, pheasants, and all kinds of songbirds. Very pleasant staff; bathrooms and showers very clean, but only one facility for entire park. Small store on site, but town is five miles away.

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Access to the campground is through the parking lot of another business, easy to miss the signs and the driveway entrance. Interior roads are paved, but sites are gravel. The sites are extremely tight; I had to crawl under my neighbor's slide to connect my power and water. My site was not level and too short, the manager had to put warning cones in the roadway. No room for my tow rig, so I had to shuffle it around among open spots in neighboring sites. We were parked under the brightest floodlight ever made - I had to tape a black garbage bag over my vent dome to sleep. Most of the residents are permanent, with only about six for transients. I stayed here because of the location near the hospital and ferry, but never again.