About Old Mountain Man

Roaming the Western states in my RV while I still can

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Reviews

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WAY too expensive for what you get. Service is surly and monosyllabic. Forget about getting level; it ain't happening. No wifi and no cellular service. No shade and nothing to do. You're better off getting something in town (Ely).

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Excellent little place to stay while exploring the area. It is down in a steep-walled river gorge so you are sheltered from the wind. Very clean and well-maintained. On the edge of town, so there are ample opportunities for shopping, supplies, etc. I will definitely stay here again if I ever pass through again.

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A little expensive for a casino RV park. Spacious, wide turns, easily navigable, level sites. You check in using a phone booth at the entrance, and they are very efficient. Clean and well maintained. Will stay here again unless I find something cheaper.

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A little-used campground in an oxbow of the Deschutes River. Sites are dirt, spacious, and almost level. The last 1.5 miles of road is dirt & rough with tree branches sticking out, but you will likely have the place to yourself. Town is only a few air miles away (further by road) so the cellular signal is very strong. The river is beautiful, especially in the morning, and there are fish. Very short drive to the Cascade Lakes area. I shall definitely stay here again.

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Oregon has the best State Park system in the country, and this one is no exception. Top notch. Sites are dead level but a little too close together for my comfort, but still way better than the typical "stack 'em in like sardines" RV park. You had better make reservations, even in the off-season; there was only one site left when I arrived and I could only have it for one night. Excellent cellular signal.

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My preferred campground when at Lake of the Woods, but it closes in mid-September. Service deteriorates after Labor Day when the camp host goes home. Gorgeous view of Mt. McLoughlin across the lake, with the lakeshore an easy walk from all camp sites. There are Morels here if you're lucky enough to find them. There are a few first-come-first serve spots here & there but reservations are strongly recommended. RV dump and potable water station a few miles away; a vending machine takes your ten bucks and there is no senior discount. I would spend all summer here if the Forest Service allowed it, which of course they don't.

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I prefer the other campground down the road, but this one stays open through September. You should make reservations, as it stays busy even after Labor Day. Excellent camp host. Lowest loop is basically right there at the lakeshore with nice views. Timbered and mostly in shade throughout the day. Most if not all sites will require some, but not extreme, leveling. Will stay here again if I'm too late in the season for the other campground.

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I am reluctant to review this campground because now other people will know about it and I might not have it all to myself any more. Well-known to locals, it's at 8,500 feet in elevation and stays cool during the hot days in Grand Junction 4,000 feet below, which elevation gain you will achieve in only 25 miles of road. So yes, the road is steep and where it changes to gravel it gets rough: make sure every thing in your RV is battened down or it will shake loose. Campground is in an oasis populated with aspens, oaks, deer and turkeys and you can drink the water. Gets busy on weekends but camp host says it has never been full. I shall definitely camp here again.

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A little-used campground less than a mile up the highway from Jumbo campground, and where Jumbo sends people when they are full. No water in 2016 because a rock fell on the line; maybe they'll fix it some day but this campground has seen NO maintenance in years and is deteriorating. Sad, because it is nice. Lots of pull-thrus, some nearly level and some awful. All sites are shaded with tall trees. Gourmet mushrooms grow in this campground in season, also wild strawberries and raspberries.

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One of the nicer USFS campgrounds on the Grand Mesa. For one thing, you don't have to drive for miles on rough road to get here; the entrance is off of a paved highway. Unfortunately, the State of Colorado made the Forest Service turn off the water, and you have to drive to Jumbo Campground to get water. No sewer available anywhere on the Grand Mesa. All but two sites are shaded and several will take a big rig but watch for branches. Sites are gravel/dirt, some easily leveled some not. Several hiking trails including a short one over to the Forest Service Visitor Center on the other side of the lake. Reasonably quiet except that the regional manager lives there and generates a lot of traffic. I thoroughly enjoyed my stay and will be back.

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For those who want to "rough it" a bit. No electricity, water only from a spigot. Not a real lake; it's an irrigation reservoir but still kinda nice. The largest negative value of this campground (and the reason I didn't stay very long) are the hordes of evil, little spawn-of-Satan biting flies. They are way, way worse than mosquitoes and will keep you inside with window screens tightly closed most of the time. About half of the sites are level and large enough for a 30 footer; a few will acommodate big rigs. Nice views of nearby mountains.

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Rate is monthly rate divided by 30. This is a bit of a "Party Town" park -- they openly advertise that they are "420-friendly" which does attract a certain crowd. On the other hand, everyone -- staff and guests -- are very friendly and mellow. Lots of cats about, which is always a good sign. With the grocery store in town closed, this C-store is the only place for miles around to buy gas or food, so there is lots of traffic, with concomitant noise & dust. Also, the pull-through sites are NOT LEVEL and leveling is done only with extreme effort. The pull-throughs are also very close together, to the point where slide-outs intrude onto neighboring spaces. These are the closest full hookup sites to the Grand Mesa, and there is also an RV dump for folks returning home from the Mesa. I will definitely stay here again, but not during the hot part of the year: there is no shade except in site A.

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The most popular campground in the San Juan National Forest, and for good reason: the view is spectacular. Most of the sites are level or nearly so. All are gravel. Some sites are nicely shaded, others are in the sun. Fills up quickly, even on weekdays. If you didn't make a reservation, you will need to get there in the morning to snag one of the first-come-first-served sites as someone else moves out. Cellular signal is too weak for handheld phones, but with a so-called "booster" antenna on an LTE router you can actually have Internet.

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A no-frills very basic park that caters mostly to dirt bikers but is a fine choice as base camp for sightseers. Dirt/gravel sites are very close to level and there is some shade. There is nothing in the park itself to do; all the attractions are in the surrounding area and it's a place to come back to at the end of the day. There is no cellular service in this part of Utah, no nearby stores, no gas stations so come fully supplied. Internet is weak and slow at best and the very friendly and personable owner will tell you this up front. I will camp here again next time I am through the area.

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Site is free. This is where the ranger station will send you if your combined RV length is over 26 feet, or if the regular campground is full. It's a decommissioned airstrip next to Hwy 95, at MP 87 a few miles outside of the park. There are small Juniper trees, a few fire rings, and a really nice view. You can get up to 5 gallons of water at a time from the ranger station. There is highway noise but it's not a very busy road.