Dick B.

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  • Review Count 19
  • States Reviewed 6
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Date of Stay:

A hidden gem. Operates on the honor system until May, apparently. You pick your pull-through site from numbers 1-10, fill out a registration form, plunk in $28 (with Good Sam discount) and set up your rig. Not a soul in view, but someone keeps the restrooms sparkling and the park spotless overall. Fine hookups, spacious sites--ours did need a bit of leveling--and serenely quiet, as the park is a couple miles away from the highway. A fine overnight, and we'll certainly stop here again.

Date of Stay:

A true experience in funk, camping among the abandoned open pit mines. But no complaints about the park: nice level sites, sparkling restrooms, easy in and out, apparently all pull-throughs. Good Wi-Fi signal--at $1/day, which will be explained to you by the genial host. We're staying an extra day, however: a High Wind Warning has us hunkered down to avoid wind gusts up to 70 mph out on Highway 95 ALT. Even in the park, our rig is rockin' and rollin'--though not in danger (we surmise) of capsizing. We'd stay here again--if we travel this way in the future; its a convenient stop between LV and Reno.

Date of Stay:

Well run park. Security gate is manned 24/7, apparently, and that's good: the neighborhood isn't one of luxury homes. Spaces a bit tight, but manageable with care. Clean restrooms. Professional staff is pleasant and competent. You'll want to approach the park on Nellis from the south, in order to have a right-turn entry. Trying a left-turn into the park would squelch your holiday mood.

Date of Stay:

Can't disagree totally with other happy reviewers, but a couple of beefs nevertheless. When paying for a high-end resort, you shouldn't have to use blocks to level your rig, right? And you could expect cell phone service to work, right? And the Wi-Fi to be quick and reliable, right? And more than one of the four washing machines to work, right? This place needs some management attention, and until then we won't stop here again. Too bad.

Date of Stay:

Don't miss this gem of a park, on the north shore of Lake Mead. Breathtaking red rock formations surround the campgrounds. For hookups, use the Atlatl camp, not Arch Rock. For a primitive camp in a smaller RV (say 24' or less) the Arch Rock camp is memorable. The $30 rate is for Atlatl, with water and power. Without the hookup, the rate is $20 per night. No TV, no wifi, but natural beauty by the cubic mile. Definitely will visit again.

Date of Stay:

First rank park. Reasonable rates, helpful cheery staff, level sites, easy pull-throughs, sparkling restrooms, well stocked grocery store, super fast wifi, quiet. Don't hesitate to stop.

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For $46 per night, this park should be absolutely top of the line. It is not. The sites are cramped and the streets are tight: you'd better be a true expert at maneuvering your rig. And the Wi-Fi is a joke: it barely functions at all. We will avoid this park like the plague in the future.

Date of Stay:

Fairly new state park, and a memorable experience. The cavern tour is a must, even at the $23 price tag. The campground is very attractive, with widely spaced sites and mesquite trees providing privacy. The 2.5 mile loop trail is well worth the effort--which is not trivial, especially if you take the side trip to the overlook. (This adds another mile to the hike.) Restrooms spotless. Water pressure is minimal, but it is nice to have any water at all in the desert, folks. No wifi, and no onsite sewer hookup, which is not unusual in state parks. Don't miss this experience.

Date of Stay:

Lovely state park. Wide spaces, screened from neighbors, clean restrooms, utterly spectacular views of the Catalina Mountains. Only drawbacks are lack of wifi access (we're internet junkies) and onsite sewer connections--but this is typical of state parks. Fine hiking trails and saguaro cactus forests beyond description. The virtues of the park far outweigh the negatives, and we're looking forward to another stay here. Don't miss it.

Date of Stay:

Tombstone is a gritty, historically significant town, which claims it is "Too Tough to Die." This campground fits right into this theme: a gritty, rough and ready park just a block or so from the OK Corral tourist attraction. The park has piles of old junk--artifacts, probably--around the edges and at the main office, submerging the porch and cluttering the office. But the folks are friendly as they can be, there is a huge amount of space in which to maneuver your rig, and the hookups are mostly very convenient. (Some of the back in sites have the hookups at the rear of the pad, though: bring lots of hose, power cords, and water lines.) A funky place, but you need to be open minded and not too fussy. We don't regret our choice, and we'd come back again.

     

Hidden Shores

Yuma, Arizona

Date of Stay:

This is a resort or destination park, all right, with swimming pool, golf, exercise room, etc. all readily available. It is clean and tidy as well. But well over half of the sites are occupied by small, constructed houses, and most of the rest that contain RVs seem to be occupied by permanent residents. Folks here are friendly to the transients, but the park is not meant for us: that is clear. Our major complaint is the absence of wi-fi and TV cable. For $57 you might expect to have these provided. They can be, for a monthly fee of $45--but we don't expect to be here for that long. If we were interested in golf and swimming, we'd probably rate the park somewhat higher. Staying here has been an interesting experience, but we won't be back.

Date of Stay:

Only squawk is highway noise. I-15 is a hundred yards away, and the roar is noticeable, but not intolerable. Our unit is closest to the freeway; others further away are much quieter, no doubt. Spotless, apparently newly remodeled restrooms and showers. Quick and pleasant check-in. Spacious sites, nicely leveled. Fine overnight stop.

Date of Stay:

Camping at Sunset is essentially boondocking, but with lots of neighbors and nearby amenities: a water source, clean and tidy restrooms with flush toilets, and one dump station. With no hookups, you depend on your rig's "consumables:" water, battery power, propane, and waste storage. But you can lug water a couple hundred yards in jerry cans, you can run your generator to recharge the batteries, and use the restrooms to minimize the impact on your black tank. We stayed here 4 days without having to move the rig to the dump station--primarily by dumping dishwater down the toilet: grey water storage turned out to be the limiting factor. Easy walking distance to the services at Furnace Creek, and impressive views of the mountains add to the appeal of Sunset Campground. The lack of hookups gets you closer to "camping" after all. Great experience. (The "no" answer about clean showers indicates there are no showers--not that they're unclean.)

Date of Stay:

An adequate overnight park before shooting down into Death Valley. Restroom/shower facility clean and tidy, but only two unisex units for the whole park. Tight spaces, at least one of which (ours) required leveling. No picnic tables or fireplaces--no room for them, since the next rig is about 8-10 feet away. That friendly lady greeting you and showing you your space is an asset, all right. She's a peach, but this park is really not much more than a parking lot with full hookups. We'd stay again, though; it met our needs very well. All we needed was a place to stay the night.

Date of Stay:

The owner and his delightful dachshund both gave us a hearty welcome. Roomy, level site, spotless restrooms, quiet and attractive grounds. First rate park. Will return with enthusiasm.