MrSunshine

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  • Review Count 53
  • States Reviewed 14
  • Helpful Reviews 2

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Date of Stay:

Excellent park as others have written. Great views, great hiking, lots of privacy in most of the sites. We were in site 11 and this loop has smaller sites and less privacy than some of the higher-numbered loops (as well as no hook-ups). The place is huge and could be a long walk to the bathroom for some areas. We have stayed here and at nearby Usery Mountain and the parks are very similar in their amenities, camping experience and closeness to services in town, but Lost Dutchman is quite a bit further from Phoenix. I would return to either park again without hesitation.

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Gilbert Ray is a fabulous campground. It is located in a beautiful scenic area, yet is pretty convenient to Tucson services and shopping. There are limitless things to do in the area, including several hiking trails, the adjacent National Park, the outstanding Sonoran Desert Museum and the Old Tucson theme park. The scenery is marvelous, with views from most every site. The roads are mostly one-way and easy to maneuver. The only downside is a lack of shower facilities, which makes it harder to conserve water when dry camping. Overall, I highly recommend this park when staying in the Tucson area.

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This is a wonderful park for hiking, solitude, quiet and experiencing the Sonoran desert. The sites are generally very large and fairly private, most are pull-throughs. Many good hiking trials leave right from the campground and the rangers offer free hiker shuttles to trail heads that allow you to hike back to the campground and experience real desert solitude. My only complaint is that when we arrived, we asked for a perimeter site, but were told there weren't any available that would fit our 31-foot RV. When we arrived at our site, it was not that great and there were plenty of large perimeter sites empty around us. I didn't bother to go ask for a change, but I felt that they could have accommodated us better. My advice is to arrive after 4 and pick your own site.

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Santee Lakes is a spectacular park in a suburb of San Diego (about 25 minutes away). It has seven lakes that are part of a water reclamation project and in spite of the drought in California, the landscaping is well-watered. This place is huge with very well-laid-out sites, many of which have lake views or creek views. We were up in the newer section of the park on the creek, but next time I would try to get a lakeside site, even though they are not as spacious or private. The bird life in this park is spectacular and the lakes, though artificial, are very beautiful. Security is great, with a code needed to enter, and services are very good (mail, packages, fax, printing, copying, store, propane). Long-term stays are allowed here and we met many people who basically live here, leaving every six months for two weeks to comply with the laws. There are a few activities like potlucks and coffee get-togethers, but they were not well-attended when we were there. This is not a park if you want a lot of activities, but it is very family-friendly, quiet and convenient to every type of store or service you could ask for. A great place to stay near San Diego and quite reasonably-priced. Note: our section had very weak cell coverage (Verizon), but the free wifi service from the park was pretty good.

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This is not a destination park, but a convenient place to stay when visiting the Santa Rosa area. The neighborhood is a bit sketchy, but we never felt unsafe here and the location is very good for freeway access to all surrounding areas and downtown Santa Rosa. There was lots of room so we never felt crowded and it was very easy to access with our fifth wheel. More like a parking lot than a campground, but for what it was it was great. I would likely consider it if in the Santa Rosa area again.

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This is a very nice campground and the closest to Pt. Reyes National Seashore. There was plenty of room between sites, it was easy to navigate and pull into the site, the store was reasonably well-stocked and there were no negative issues like noise. There was no view to speak of and not much in the way of amenities, but I would definitely stay here again when visiting the area.

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We loved staying at Jalama Beach. We had reservations for a week, but decided to move into a first-come site for an additional week because we liked it so much. First the negatives: our site was up on the top tier and it was challenging to back into, the park gets a fair amount of day users and there is almost nothing out there but the beach, the store and the grill. That being said, it is one of our favorite parks because of the beach, the grill and the activity around the park. It felt like a little village, with friendly people and the local post office/store/restaurant as a hang out place. The beach was gorgeous and you could walk in either direction for miles and very quickly get as much solitude as you wanted. The sunsets were spectacular and our site had a great view. It was fun watching the surfers and kite surfers play. The nearby (30 minutes) town of Lompoc had a great farmer's market and one of the most beautiful missions we have every visited. The weather was delightful, if windy some days. We would most certainly come back here.

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Morro Bay is a great little town with beautiful beaches and lots to do in the area. This state park is older, as most are, but decently kept up and located in a great area. Just across the street is the marina and a wetlands trail. The town of Morro Bay is about a mile away. We stayed in the front section of the park, which is three rows of pull-throughs with electric and water hookups, which are long but kind of narrow. There is no view to speak of, but the vegetation provides a decent amount of privacy. The roads are easy to navigate and the sites are pretty level. Overall a great place to stay in the area.

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San Simeon State Park is a large campground with three separate areas, two are more developed with paved sites closer to the highway and the ranger kiosk and one is up on the hill with better views and more primitive (also cheaper). We had reservations for one of the primitive sites, but we opted to move down to the more developed campground because it was less dusty and more landscaped. Wifi/cell service is an issue here. We had no Verizon service, but the park did have wifi service, unfortunately we couldn't get a good connection at our site and had to walk a short way to connect to wifi. Still, we liked the campground and loved the area and would recommend it as a good base for exploring Cambira/San Simeon/Hearst Castle.

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Location, location, location! Kirk Creek is a primitive campground with no running water, no internet or cell service, primitive toilets that weren't very clean and no amenities. But it is perched right on a bluff overlooking the Big Sur coast and nearly all the sites have ocean views. We loved it here and met many people who return often. There is a walk down to a very rocky small beach and some nice beaches are within a few miles. Limekiln State Park is a lovely little redwood canyon just a few miles north and they have fresh water to fill up containers if you need it (but you couldn't pull an RV into there to fill tanks, not enough room). This is one of the most spectacular settings we have ever camped in. Come with a full tank of fresh water and get ready to enjoy the coast. Note: some of the campsites on the second or third row actually have better ocean views than the first row along the bluff due to vegetation.

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Henry Cowell is a beautiful park, very close (10 minute drive) to Santa Cruz and even closer to Felton (grocery stores, gas, etc.). The campground is old and the sites vary a lot as to size, level, etc. We barely fit in our site (#39) but there were several that would have fit our 31-foot fifth wheel just fine. It is a very beautiful place to stay with hiking trails, nearby redwood grove and reasonable privacy and quiet.

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Richardson Grove straddles highway 101 and contains a small but very nice old-growth redwood grove. Unfortunately they chose to build highway 101 so it runs right through the middle of the grove, cutting it in two and destroying the normal quiet of a redwood grove. It is a nice little park nonetheless and the campground is pretty good. It is a typical no-hook-up forest campground with flush toilets and water spigots around. The road is narrow but not too bad and many of the sites could handle a larger RV than our 31 ft. fifth wheel. There is decent space between sites, though most have driveways at right angles to the road, making backing in a bit tricky. There are a few pull-throughs. No dump station but there is a commercial campground nearby that has one. Our Verizon data reception was marginal but with our MiFi we got good Internet.

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Patrick's Point is a beautiful park, with many scenic vistas, great bike roads (for short rides), wonderful tide pools and beaches. The campground is a bit sketchy, with many of the sites being small and narrow. Some are literally carved out from the overgrown brush making them more like single car garages than campsites. We stayed in one of the "premium" sites, which have some kind of view and more space. Ours had a distant view of Agate Beach and was private on three sides, but faced the day use parking lot, which was not really a problem. I would stay here again for the park but it is worth getting here on a weekday morning to have a chance to get a premium site. Our rate reflects the premium site cost minus the senior discount.

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As others have written, the setting is spectacular with views up and down the Klamath River. Way off the highway and very quiet (except for the morning ritual leaf blower which was annoying). It is a bit more expensive than many of the other parks in the Klamath area (ours reflects a Passport America discount plus $5 for a river view site), but it seems to be by far the best. The other parks either are right on 101 or not on the river or junky. We extended our stay because the park is so nice and it is located right between two of the major state/national park areas and is a perfect location for sightseeing. Crescent City (20 miles) is the nearest decent grocery store, but worth a visit anyway for its local attractions.

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This is one of many National Forest campgrounds around Trinity Lake. We stayed here in the fall of a bad drought year and the water was turned off to the campground, so the spaces were half price. Our rate reflects a 50% senior access pass discount on that. I don't give 10 ratings out very often, but this campground deserves it. Spaces are HUGE and very spread out for privacy. Roads are paved and wide, some pull-throughs have room for multiple large RVs. It is very quiet and in a beautiful wooded setting. Satellite dishes and solar would probably not work here, but they have 30 amp hookups to most sites. The location is about a mile from the lake and boat ramp, other campgrounds are right on the lake with lake views from some sites, but I think this is the only one with electric hookups. The lake level is WAY down (well over 100 feet!) from full, but still accessible. This entire area is wonderful for hiking, fishing and exploring historic Weaverville. In mid-September we stayed a week and much of the time we were the only campers here!