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This is a family-owned camp whose proprietors dote on their customers. Someone was always available dawn to dusk. Almost everything is provided for adults, children and pets: a lake, paddle boating; pet runs; fenced childrens' playgrounds; horseshoes, volleyball, etc. Wi-Fi was excellent once a one-time sign on was negotiated. The trip to Itasca State Park ($5 for a parking pass) to view - and wade in, if you wish - the headwaters of the Mississippi River was a highlight. A 2-hour tour of Lake Itaska via boat ($16) included a good history lecture and some animal sightings.

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This is a well-engineered park for Class A motorhomes. Roads are wide and paved. Sites are packed gravel surrounded by grass. Curbs and stairs with banisters are placed at appropriate spots. There is a view of Lake Superior from most of the terraced sites, each of which has two sewers so rvs can be placed to maximize the view. We could find no Wi-Fi service; Verizon had a strong signal. It is a city-owned park.

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The Historical Park is a lovely place for a lengthy stay surrounded by grass with a view of the Kaministiquia River from all sites, with one misunderstanding. References to "full service RV camping" should have been read more closely to realize individual sites do not have sewers, requiring that intended stays include picking up and driving to the dump site as necessary. Otherwise, staff was friendly and worked hard to keep us from having to change sites after we decided to extend our stay. The other utilities were fine and Wi-Fi worked consistently. The portapoddy we used occasionally was not emptied during our 10-day stay; otherwise cleanliness was excellent. The Fort William tour (teens of dollars) is not to be missed. Guides play 1815 roles and pretend to expect contemporaneous answers from tourists to questions such as "where did you dock your canoe." (Once we figured that out, we said we were from "a Spanish possession to the south called Florida".) Thunder Bay itself is a prosperous city with lots of major brand stores and, at least in July, frequent thunderstorms.

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The park has wonderful scenery. Try to get a site that looks through the trees to the lake. To reach the camp, go past a fishing camp with the same name. Once you're there, go up a steep hill to reach the office. Wi-Fi is usable only very near the office. Satellite TV will work in the few sites with openings in the trees.

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This is the most basic overnight kind of place. Each site of five has a few meters of level gravel, 30 amp electricity and an unthreaded sewer pipe. It's just off the King's Highway but three RVs between us and the road shielded traffic noise. A couple trains came near during the night. There is some evidence that fifty amp sites will exist someday, but for now they are only a little gravel and wire sprouting out of the ground. A Canadian Tire megastore is a short walk away, as is a good-sized grocery store. There are a couple mom-and-pop restaurants downtown and chains along the highway. Fushimi Provincial Park is a 45-minute drive away and is mostly for fisher types.

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This is a great place for kids: toddlers and other have the beach; preteens can fish, bike around the campground and socialize; teens and later with ATVs have many off-road trails outside the park. For adults, the only bike trip available is a 7 kilometer trip around Big Nellie Lake. Most occupants are seasonals. Smoky campfires at night can irritate the allergic. Wi-Fi is sturdy but a bit slow (1 mps). The park is heavily wooded, limiting satellite TV use. Management is very attentive. Vehicle washing with piped-in lake water is permitted.

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This well-managed resort abutting the Sturgeon River has a lot of things to do, including swimming in the river, rental boats, onsite food service, playground, etc. The rate is in USD. The staff handled a 28-vehicle caravan with aplomb. Seasonals are separated from short-timers. A large variety of sites can handle anything imaginable. Wi-Fi faltered only once (free for email and low intensity use; $2.50 a day for very good high speed.) The fishing dock, however, was a small, shaky floating dock. A museum about the history, geology and game of the area is a 3 km bike ride. The last 3 km to the camp is over a rough paved road. It is okay to wash vehicles. The town of Sturgeon Falls lacks falls (sacrificed to build a hydroelectric station). Sturgeon in nearby Lake Nipissing have been hunted for caviar almost to extinction.

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Price in $US. Thoughtful owner left gate up for our late arrival. Large camp, mostly filled with seasonals, many of whom have elaborately embellished their sites. Our pull through spot was long enough for 40' motorhome with attached Jeep. Electric (30 amp) and water were fine but post to which outlets were attached was about to fall down. Staff said RVs kept hitting it. Plenty of open space for satellite TV. Docks with 60 spaces are on a canal going to Lake Couchiching and then to Lake Simcoe. Pool was being filled in chilly early June weather. Wi-Fi for 120 continuous minutes per device was included, with additional fee for longer use.

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Price is in $US for a full hookup riverfront site. Long, level back-in parking. Very pleasant wooded place away from town. No Wi-Fi. Satellite-friendly. Helpful staff. Store was well stocked. In early June, pool was being prepared for use. Many sites for all types of camping, from tents to giant motorhomes. The Canadian side of Niagara Falls features Horseshoe Falls, not visible from the U.S. The street-side falls are open without fee. Parking near the falls is expensive ($C23).

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Fine campground for those who don't need the pool, game room, playground equipment, etc., provided by a nearby KOA. All RV sites are back-in and most come with full hookups. Plenty of open space for tent camping. Only a couple have visibility for satellite TV. Jacks sank into the gravel at the back of our site; boards fixed that. Ground around parking space was newly seeded and muddy when it rained. Wi-Fi was included in the price and worked more times than not. Friendly management. Niagara Falls, twenty minutes away, is the major reason for visiting. Admission is free but attractions inside the state park are at additional cost (e.g., introductory movie was $8 per person). Admission is free but attractions inside the state park are at additional cost (e.g., introductory movie was $8 per person). "Cave of the Winds" ($17) had no cave but exciting walkway and stairs at the bottom of the American Falls after 170' elevator ride. Sandals and ponchos are included but you will get wet anyway as you touch the falling water and watch the entire length of the falls cascade down. "Waterproof" smartphones stopped taking pictures once the screens and our hands got wet.

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A resort that has everything - pool, putting, propane, playground, etc. - at resort/famous town prices. Staff was friendly. The store was well-stocked. Sites for satellite TV (or about any other request) were available. The WiFi worked well but the camp was pretty empty in the off-season. Gettysburg Campground is convenient to the historic downtown and parts of the Gettysburg National Military Park. The Visitors' Center is a bit further out of town. Don't miss the tour of the downtown house in which Jennie Wade died, the only civilian death from the Gettysburg battles, or the Visitors' Centers' film, cyclorama and museum run by a foundation (NPS senior freebie passes not accepted). The auto tour takes you through both sides' lines and three days of battles - allow at least a half day and consider buying the accompanying CD or a park features book for more information that what is in the NPS tour map.

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This large park has good facilities. The spacious grass sites were a bit muddy after heavy rains. The amount paid is with no discounts; only cash or checks are accepted. The above price is with tax and seemed high for offseason. Reservations are made only by going to the web site, printing out a form and mailing it with a $40 check, but staff will tell you how full it is expected to be by phone. Permanent and seasonals are separated from the short-timers. Wi-Fi was faultless but the short-time part of the park had only a few customers. Camp store is very well stocked. Fishing permitted off the park's dock. Some days the wild ponies can be seen with binoculars from the dock.

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This is an okay park, except beware of the white unthreaded pipes next to the water & electric at "full hookup" sites. If you put your sewer hose into one and let loose, you will create a mess as you try to dump into a water cutoff valve. Makes starting with a little bit of grey water to make sure all's well an even more important practice. Hatteras Villages charges for "full" hookups because an employee comes around occasionally with a honey wagon. Other than that, this place in the middle of Hatteras has narrow and short paved sites and sporadic WiFi. While the cost is relatively high, you're on the Outer Banks and near such landmarks as the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. The only "resort" feature noted was a swimming pool, empty in early May.

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This is a place to overnight before taking the Cedar Island Ferry to Cape Hatteras, or if you're a fanatic fisherman. It is not a resort: the pool is closed permanently and any other amenities that may have existed in the past (batting cage, etc.) are no longer in service. About half of the park is occupied seasonally/permanently by older units apparently used by weekend fishers. It has a boat launch and dockside gasoline ($3.30/gal in April 2016). Mosquito season was well underway at the end of April with spraying by the county predicted to happen soon. The owners are a charming and helpful couple who have lived on the site for 40 years. Reservations are highly recommended for the Cedar Island Ferry as is arrival an hour or so before departure. Reservations are cancelled 30 minutes before departure. Our trip at 10:30 a.m. on a Sunday morning was full. Loading a 40' motorhome with toad attached cost $45 but was no problem with crew guidance. The trip from the RV park was only 8 miles but took a half hour so allow enough time.

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This large commercial campgound has just about everything a camper could want: large spaces, full hookups, level sites, propane, friendly staff, etc. It is on U.S. 17, resulting in some road noise for anyone sleeping with open windows. Also, a few trains can be faintly heard during the night. Oak trees abound but many sites are satellite-friendly. Sand fleas and mosquitoes were present early in the evening. The owners have put up six WiFi sites but internet access was sporadic during times of heavy use. Most pads are sand but a few are concrete. Our sandy spot was level. Park is a 10-mile drive away from historic downtown Charleston.