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A resort that has everything - pool, putting, propane, playground, etc. - at resort/famous town prices. Staff was friendly. The store was well-stocked. Sites for satellite TV (or about any other request) were available. The WiFi worked well but the camp was pretty empty in the off-season. Gettysburg Campground is convenient to the historic downtown and parts of the Gettysburg National Military Park. The Visitors' Center is a bit further out of town. Don't miss the tour of the downtown house in which Jennie Wade died, the only civilian death from the Gettysburg battles, or the Visitors' Centers' film, cyclorama and museum run by a foundation (NPS senior freebie passes not accepted). The auto tour takes you through both sides' lines and three days of battles - allow at least a half day and consider buying the accompanying CD or a park features book for more information that what is in the NPS tour map.

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This large park has good facilities. The spacious grass sites were a bit muddy after heavy rains. The amount paid is with no discounts; only cash or checks are accepted. The above price is with tax and seemed high for offseason. Reservations are made only by going to the web site, printing out a form and mailing it with a $40 check, but staff will tell you how full it is expected to be by phone. Permanent and seasonals are separated from the short-timers. Wi-Fi was faultless but the short-time part of the park had only a few customers. Camp store is very well stocked. Fishing permitted off the park's dock. Some days the wild ponies can be seen with binoculars from the dock.

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This is an okay park, except beware of the white unthreaded pipes next to the water & electric at "full hookup" sites. If you put your sewer hose into one and let loose, you will create a mess as you try to dump into a water cutoff valve. Makes starting with a little bit of grey water to make sure all's well an even more important practice. Hatteras Villages charges for "full" hookups because an employee comes around occasionally with a honey wagon. Other than that, this place in the middle of Hatteras has narrow and short paved sites and sporadic WiFi. While the cost is relatively high, you're on the Outer Banks and near such landmarks as the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. The only "resort" feature noted was a swimming pool, empty in early May.

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This is a place to overnight before taking the Cedar Island Ferry to Cape Hatteras, or if you're a fanatic fisherman. It is not a resort: the pool is closed permanently and any other amenities that may have existed in the past (batting cage, etc.) are no longer in service. About half of the park is occupied seasonally/permanently by older units apparently used by weekend fishers. It has a boat launch and dockside gasoline ($3.30/gal in April 2016). Mosquito season was well underway at the end of April with spraying by the county predicted to happen soon. The owners are a charming and helpful couple who have lived on the site for 40 years. Reservations are highly recommended for the Cedar Island Ferry as is arrival an hour or so before departure. Reservations are cancelled 30 minutes before departure. Our trip at 10:30 a.m. on a Sunday morning was full. Loading a 40' motorhome with toad attached cost $45 but was no problem with crew guidance. The trip from the RV park was only 8 miles but took a half hour so allow enough time.

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This large commercial campgound has just about everything a camper could want: large spaces, full hookups, level sites, propane, friendly staff, etc. It is on U.S. 17, resulting in some road noise for anyone sleeping with open windows. Also, a few trains can be faintly heard during the night. Oak trees abound but many sites are satellite-friendly. Sand fleas and mosquitoes were present early in the evening. The owners have put up six WiFi sites but internet access was sporadic during times of heavy use. Most pads are sand but a few are concrete. Our sandy spot was level. Park is a 10-mile drive away from historic downtown Charleston.

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Skidaway is a heavily-forested campground with mostly water and electric sites; Spots are allocated on a first-come basis. All are pull throughs. The few full hookup locations are booked months in advance. Rangers will identify the couple of sites open enough for satellite TV. Our space was level. Downtown Savannah is a short drive. Tour buses will pick up at the park. The only wildlife seen on a short hike were birds, squirrels and a couple raccoons.

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This Civil War-oriented park has heavily-forested sites, mostly pull-though, with 30 amp electricity and water. Most have no sewers; the few sites with sewers are booked months in advance. Otherwise, site selection is up to the camper. Satellite TV is unavailable but OTA will pick up all networks from Savanah local stations. Verizon service was okay but no WiFi. Programs in April, 2016, included Uniforms of the Confederacy; Civil War Surgery, Civil War Military Drilling as well as several back to the 19th Century programs such as "Coastal Native American Hunting." The camp host displays a Confederate Battle Flag at his site. The nightly price includes a one-day park fee of $5. Non-residents over 62 get a 5% discount.

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This quiet state park has only 13 pull throughs. It is easily accessible from Interstate 75. Most sites are heavily wooded but park staff will identify the few with a decent chance for satellite TV if you ask; after that the customer picks the site on a first-come basis. The $28 price reflects a 20% senior citizen discount but not a one-time $5 charge for a park pass, making High Falls relatively expensive for a camp with no WiFi and hookups only for electricity and water. There is a dump site on the way out.

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This bare-bones park's claims to fame are the nearby Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge and in-town restaurants featuring green chile cheeseburgers. Its also a couple hours' drive to the Very Large Array of radio telescopes in the New Mexico desert. The Refuge is a birdwatcher's winter paradise with a Festival of the Cranes annually the week before Thanksgiving. The RV Park has full hookups and little else; the sites aren't even numbered. The picnic tables are old cable spools.

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The $150 a night rate gets you a spot in the temporary "Presidential" campground with water, 30 amp electric, and a few visits from the honey wagon depending on how long you stay. The site is on a bluff overlooking the entire 55-football-field-large launching area for 500+ hot air balloons during the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, but you will be a few rows back from the front rank as sponsors and VIPs get the first row. Don't miss the early-morning flight preparations with balloons lit up by their propane burners as they prepare for flight. Suggest watching one mass launch from the restricted-access bluff (bring folding chairs), then going down on the field the next day to mingle with the crowd of spectators and balloonists as the craft are prepared for launch. Amazingly, some balloons are able to use winds in different directions at different heights to return to the launch site after a few hours in the air. There are mid-week contests best seen from on the field as balloonists try to throw weighted bags at targets, etc. Weather permitting, hundreds of balloons launch around 7 a.m. each morning, with the biggest mass ascensions on weekends and Wednesday of Fiesta Week. If the Balloon Fiesta is on your Bucket List, staying at the Presidential Campground is the way to see it. Other cites near the Fiesta are all dry camping.

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Can't beat the price for this full hookup spot adjoining a Casino about 50 miles west of Albuquerque even though it was a bit muddy. Some sites too uneven to level a motorhome. No pressure to patronize the Casino.

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This in-town park is heavily wooded, with only a couple satellite-friendly sites but the very friendly managers will work to get you what you need. Most spots are back-in. WiFi was problematical. A Visitors Center, with information about Mesa Verde N.P. and other attractions is across the street and it's an easy walk to restaurants and stores. Pepperhead Restaurant had excellent southwestern fare and unique margaritas. Cortez is at the heart of Native American cliff dwelling territory with Mesa Verde N.P. the main draw. A nearby Anasazi Heritage Center adds perspective and there are walking trails in the Escalante Ruins.

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This well-maintained park is ten miles south of Montrose, with beautiful views of the San Juan and Uncompahgre mountains. Sites are large with some grass between them. WiFi was robust. Row ends are best for satellite dishes. Rate reflects a 3-for-2-day special. Managers are enthusiastic off-roaders who will sugggest trips in the area.

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Closest park to Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Easy parking in large pull-through sites. Satellite TV no problem.

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High price comes from being only available commercial RV park in the area. Tiger Run is a RV condo with some spots rented on behalf of absent owners. It has many recreational facilities that short-termers will probably not use, including heated pool, tennis, volleyball, etc. Blue River sites are along a babbling brook but get a lot of traffic noise from SR9 on the other side of the river.