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This camp has resort facilities such as an elaborate playground, fishing pond and pool. It is heavily wooded except for several sites in a field where satellite dishes can work. Don't arrive at night without arranging for camp personnel; there are complicated pathways and few lights. Don't miss the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts: it is on the grounds of the original Woodstock Festival and elaborately commemorates the event.

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This park had heavily-potholed entry roads, traffic noise and no Wi-Fi. Our 30-amp, no sewer site delivered only 109 volts of electricity. The few spots with 50 amp and sewer were occupied by long-term customers. A bridge on the only access road had a 27,000 pound limit, a legalism frequently ignored to judge by the Class A motor homes in the park. Our satellite dish had no problems. Verizon phone/internet service was spotty.

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"Notches" in the local lingo are mountain passes and the camp has fine views of 5 of them. Dixville Notch, home of the first presidential vote reporting (the few residents gather at midnight to cast their ballots) is one of them. The park is ATV/snowmobile oriented, with trail connections on the grounds. Price reflects weekly rate. Wi-Fi is spotty; best near the office. This is the northern-most reviewed camp in New Hampshire. No satellite TV problems. The genial owner had local information and the Chamber of Commerce downtown (on the second floor of a bank building) had lots of maps and suggestions.

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Campground has added strong Wi-Fi. This newish park still is pretty much 2 open fields for motorhomes, plus sites on the heavily-wooded periphery for others. Satellite dish worked well in the open area. No problem with Verizon.

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All sites are pull throughs. Rate is for low season after Labor Day. This is generally a very good park but for a few quibbles: getting a spot suitable for satellite TV is difficult (all those oaks). Most useable spots are occupied by seasonals or returning customers who reserved specific, satellite-friendly sites. Most other spots leave the camper with mediocre cable (standard definition, 24 channels, none of them premium) or OTA TV. Try several different staffers and you may find one who will try to find a satellite-friendly spot for you. Lots of mulch and gravel have been imported to alleviate the problems of the sites being on dirt but much of the gravel had dissipated by Labor Day. Sites have been leveled since we were last here two years ago but some spots have sharp drop-offs requiring rigs to be backed out. Wi-Fi and other utilities operated flawlessly.

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The campground is primarily a seasonal park with many activities for children but daily sites are available. We had a good back-in on sand. The place is heavily forested, making use of satellite dish impossible. There is no cable TV. Wifi was good.

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The waterfront sites have lovely scenery of the Passamaquoddy Bay and Canadian islands Deer and Campobello. We parked "wrong way" to the utilities to get the best view. Extreme leveling with several boards put the front wheels in the air. Wifi was poor and Verizon unavailable except for a Canadian signal available to users of the company's international service. The Old Sow whirlpool (ask at the office for a map) can be seen a couple hours before high tide from rocks a short hike away. It was barely discernible the day we looked but several small "piglets" twirled sticks and seaweed around for a minutes at a time. The campground's onsite restaurant closes after Labor Day.

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From your campsite, a huge expanse of Bay of Fundy mud flats opens up as the tide falls. Few can resist walking in the mud, which is thick enough to suck off shoes. The secret to easy movement is to walk in the stream beds that form as low tide approaches. Most sites have good views, but trees encroach beginning with front row spots above #15. There's a new owner and pets are now allowed.

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Closeness to the Hopewell Rocks is this place's selling point. Our site had a nice view of the lake and marshland. We walked out to the dam after sunset but didn't spot any moose. The 10 mph speed limit is governed by prevalent potholes. Wifi was weak at our site far from the office.

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This park is mostly seasonals with a small, unlevel, area for transients. Our motorhome needed several boards and ended up with the front wheels off the ground.

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Basic no frills campground on the Annapolis River. Payment by cash only. Wifi was very good. On-site propane was very expensive, $US4.80 a gallon by our figuring, also cash only. The park is kept up pretty well, possibly because it is for sale.

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Almost all sites have a beautiful view of Margaret's Bay and are close enough to get salt spray when the wind is up. Sunsets are beautiful. RVs are crowded together; no space for awnings and the picnic table was squeezed between units. The young man running check-ins couldn't find our reservation. Said the person who took it wasn't authorized and "should never have answered the phone." Because of that glitch we ended up at a site with no sewer. Payment was cash only, with no discount for limited facilities. Route 333 is very narrow and winding whichever way you take it.

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This place advertises itself as a "family campground" and has lots of stuff for children: playground, pool, etc. For adults, there's a driving range and golf course. Sites goods-sized. Wifi was excellent. Easy drive into Moncton from the park.

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This park opened the summer of 2016 and was a work in progress as of that August. It overlooks the Restogouche River. Most sites have a lovely view. The office and an interpretive center are in operation. The sites are gravel as of this writing and some have a +2 degree downward slope. If you don't want your front wheels several inches in the air, avoid even-numbered sites 42-56. Paving is in the future. The first section, Nos. 1-38, has the most level places, but many spots in that area are 30 amp. If your rig is more than 3.6 meters (11' 10") tall, avoid Subway St. as you arrive. Instead continue to Andrew St. and go all the way to the water, past an information center, and around to the park.

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Relaxing stop for an overnight or a few days. The only sites on the Iroquois River are 30 amp back-ins or tent sites. Pull-throughs had water and 50 amp but no onsite sewer. Other spots had full hookups. Nice beachy area for enjoying the water. Pleasant woods throughout. Satellite TV use tricky at a few spots, not available at most. Use of onboard laundry discouraged. Camp provided good notes on local restaurants and other attractions. Despite warnings about "vagaries" of Wi-Fi, our signal was excellent and worked on several different devices. Sites were composed of a mix of grass, dirt and a little gravel. Overnight rains left many puddles. Owner takes cash or check only. If you write a check on U.S. funds you will be giving him a large bonus when the Canadian dollar is far below the U.S. dollar.