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Date of Stay:

Non-resident rate (not including $4 reservation fee). We stayed on the northern side because of the dog friendly beach. It was very nice to be able to walk there from the camper. Campground design is typical for high-demand coastal locations. No real privacy or shade, but you are steps from the water. Sites were level and clean with modern hookups for power, water and sewer. The spots had a little bit of grass and picnic tables but no fire ring. The suspension bridge is cool to see at night and wasn't too noisy. But I wouldn't camp near the bathhouse because its ventilation system is extremely loud and runs constantly. Inside, it's modern and clean. Another note on the showers: Only the actual shower stalls have a curtain, while the hooks and shelves are in a common changing area. It doesn't offer as much privacy as I would expect at a state park. Nonetheless, we had a great visit and woke up to Reveille playing from the Coast Guard station. Very good Verizon LTE service.

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Rate doesn't include the $5 you get back by returning your keycard upon departure. Resort is better suited for summer family getaways than overnight stops. Many sites have permanently installed trailers or fifth-wheels which are owned by families or rented out by the campground - a phenomenon I had not seen before coming to the northeast. Hookups were good and WiFi works throughout the property. The size of the campground is its biggest downside. Our site at the far edge was a half-mile walk back to the main office -- the only place with showers or laundry. That is a slog while wearing shower shoes or hauling clothes and it explains the popularity of golf carts at the resort. For this price, I would have also appreciated real showers instead of the coin-operated ones that waste the first few minutes waiting for hot water. If you're coming from a great distance, beware they will not accept check-ins after 10 p.m. and you'll lose your money.

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Great campground with easy interstate access for our road trip. It was nice to see an actual person in the guard shack at night, rather than messing with registration envelopes. We stayed on the B loop without hookups. You don't get to choose your specific site until you get to the park, but apparently that is changing in March 2018. Very quiet at night and no flooding problems despite persistent rain. Bathrooms were a little dated but kept clean. Nice to have a dish sink and grey water dump at the bathhouse. Individual shower rooms had a few bugs but the water was nice and hot.

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My first time in a Maryland state park, so I wasn't prepared to decipher the 16 different camping prices, depending on electric/non-electric, state residency, Golden Age membership and the day of the week. Not sure what formula they use that causes most of the rates to end in 74 cents, payable only by cash or check - not the most convenient when the campground office is closed. To the ranger's credit, he did tally the fee box for the night and insisted on bringing me the $0.26 I overpaid. Only eight electric sites on the Acorn Loop, and we were lucky to snag one that wasn't reserved on a weeknight. Bathhouse looked very new and was fantastically clean. Sites are heavily wooded and quiet. Weak Verizon 3G service.

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As expected for an NPS site. No hookups and no showers, so about as rustic as it gets. $17 to camp in the off-season, though things were starting to get crowded on a weekday in late March when the weather was nice. Reservations are not accepted before May 15, and loops C, D and F were off-limits when we visited. If you camp during full occupancy, I would stay as far back in the campground as possible. The configuration means traffic for all 142 sites is funneled through loops A and B so I imagine it would be quite busy. Decent tree cover and you can hear the creek on the western side of the campground. NPS is a little stingy with campsite spacing though, so we had a pretty clear view of every person on the loop and what they were cooking. But nothing beats camping in the park and having trailheads at your campsite.

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One of the best maintained USFS areas I've seen. Roads and parking pads are paved and sites are level. Very generous spacing between sites, though you will see your neighbors. In the off-season (including late March), the majority of the campground is closed so everyone was concentrated in the front three loops and it filled up during nice weather. Bathrooms are a little old, but the push-button showers are nice and hot. Weak Verizon signal only works for text messages. Free WiFi if you hang around the gatehouse or amphitheater.

     

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Moab Valley RV Resort

Moab, Utah

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The "dynamic pricing" is unusual but I definitely got my money's worth while visiting the national parks. Campground has a huge number of amenities including a pool, hot tub, outdoor games, pet area, dish washing sink and WiFi that was plenty fast. If you have a small rig, definitely ask for the water/electric back-in sites, or even dry camp at a tent site. This side of the park has substantially more room than the full hookup sites, where the spots are so tight that slides nearly touch. Big bathrooms had great hot water and pressure for cleaning up after a day on the trails. Staff keeps a close eye on the park and even greets you with cookies at check in!

     

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Ballard RV Park

Thompson, Utah

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Good spot to stop on approach to Moab and avoid some of the markups in town. Full hookups at every site, though the office has two small bathrooms with shower stalls if you don't want to use your rig. Poplar spot with ATV riders but they didn't cause any noise problems. You will hear freight trains and the California Zephyr whiz by at night. The property is fairly level with clean gravel and dust wasn't an issue. We couldn't get the WiFi to work and used the strong Verizon LTE service instead.

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Excellent campground literally feet from the entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park. I waded through reviews for all the other Grand Lake sites before settling on this one. My parents were on this trip, so I wanted to find more of the creature comforts but still feel like you were outside. Many (but not all) the sites are separated by generous vegetation, so there is a decent sense of privacy. Numbered photos of each site are posted on their Facebook page if you really want to plan ahead. Huge and clean bathrooms with plenty of stalls plus private shower rooms. There is even an outdoor commercial sink with hot water so van and tent campers can wash dishes. WiFi only reaches a few sites, but there is a comfy TV lounge where you can browse away. Friendly staff with an even friendlier dog to welcome you.

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Add $5 if making a reservation, which you probably want because this place was packed on a July weekend. Great tree cover and modern sites with water and 30/50 hookups. You will be able to see your neighbors, but the spacing is more generous than I've see at other Tennessee parks. Park does offer WiFi, which gave a strong signal at the site but had limited bandwidth for anything beyond fetching email. Usable Verizon LTE service in the park. Very friendly camp store with firewood and basic supplies and food. Rangers had organized hayrides, educational events, a movie night and even a Pokemon hike throughout the weekend.

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$10 for site without hookups. Great NPS campground with easy access to the trail network and downtown Hot Springs. There were two hosts alternating shifts during peak season, plus regular patrols by rangers. As others have said, no showers on site so use your rig or head to Bathhouse Row. Both hookup and tent sites are available along the creek, and they are also the farthest back from the highway.

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$30 a night (+$5 for parking without annual pass) seems a little high for a low-demand location. But it's a very pretty park and an easy stopping point between Augusta and Savannah. Clean and level sites with tons of room and trees in between. Use caution with the electrical hookups. Our control panel gave a fault for AC overload after we plugged in, so the wiring may be questionable. Cleanest bathrooms I've seen in a state park. Weak but useable Verizon voice and LTE coverage. You can hear multiple trains passing in the near distance, but it wasn't disruptive.

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Popular and large state campground. Area A is the most up-to-date with new paving, modern bathrooms and some waterfront sites. Workers say the B and C areas are due for upgrades heading into 2016. Area D is primitive camping and designated online as "tent only". The park seems stricter about keeping vans and Class B's out of this area compared with other campgrounds. Small camp store sells ice and other supplies but get firewood before you come into the park.

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Lightly used Forest Service campground with very spacious sites. There were only a handful of people in the entire park even on a summer weekend. We stayed at one of the $7 primitive sites, but the loop is a very rough drive and only a few of the sites are suitable for a Class B. Lake has a sand beach and swimming access. Area is well patrolled by rangers and a camp host. Bathrooms are average for USFS and could use a good cleaning to cut down on the grime and bugs.

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Well maintained and patrolled state park, but the sites are very close together. We visited on a peak weekend and there wasn't much room to move around. Staff was friendly, with a small camp store and woodshed. A word of caution if you're a Class B owner and sometimes "dry camp" in primitive sites: Most of the tent sites are what other places would call "walk in" sites. You're parking on the road and walking into the picnic/fire area. Others are on severe inclines. I would say only basic sites 52, 54, 56 and 59 have enough space to park in the living area of the site.