214909 User submitted reviews online!!
04/2014
rating [ 4/10 ]
Note that some of the literature we were given there calls this "Goulding’s Camp Park", and lists the telephone number as "435 727 3235". This Good Sam RV and tent campground is nestled in among red sandstone cliffs, next to the Goulding Trading Post and Museum. Apparently, John Wayne movies are shown nightly at the trading post theater. There is a convenience store and gas station just down the road, the Navajo Nation’s Monument Valley scenic area, where many Western movies were made, is about four miles east across the main highway. I wish I could give this Good Sam campground a better rating than I am going to. The sandstone cliffs surrounding the campground seem to block most of the wind, which can be pretty intense in Monument Valley. The relatively level sites are compact red dirt, most with at least some shade trees. The asphalt access roads are narrow with tight turns, and may be tricky for bigger rigs. The staff person was somewhat harried and impersonal. I did not try the free Wi-Fi. There is no formal dog walk, guests are asked to have their dogs use “underdeveloped” areas; the only place we found to use was the side of the road in front of the campground. A previous reviewer commented on the unavailability of showers; the showers are actually inside the campground store, and are thus available only during store hours, which were about 7 AM to 8:30 PM when we were there; it would seem this obstacle could be overcome with a little planning. I have no further information on the showers. The restrooms are accessible at all hours from the campground by use of a swipe card, which you get when checking in to the campground. The mens restroom, which serves fifty (50) RV sites, has only two sinks, two urinals, and just one toilet stall. Although the restroom was regularly “cleaned”, a close look revealed various small blobs of debris at heights of up to three feet on the restroom walls. The one toilet was occupied when I needed it by one of those fellows who sit there to read and contemplate, rather than someone who was ready to do his business. I survived the long wait, barely, and then discovered that the toilet was not actually fastened securely to the floor. Later, as I walked to the office to turn in my restroom card, I noticed that the pay phone on the wall was out of order. Although I am accustomed to paying high dollar at campgrounds near National Parks (and the Navajo Nation’s Monument Valley area is equally of international interest, the rate of $44 with a Good Sam card seemed excessive given the level of the amenities present. We stayed one night in an Aliner, and are unlikely to stay again at the current level of service and price. If you are totally self-contained, have a modest-sized rig, don’t mind paying the high rate, and really want to spend some time in Monument valley, maybe this campground would work for you.
03/2014
rating [ 8/10 ]
Another one of those great Arizona State Parks. This one has spaces scattered around the edges of a lake/reservoir, in mesquite, juniper, and cottonwood trees. There are extensive hiking paths, boats and canoes for rent, and guided boat tours of the lake. Most of the sites have shade. There are many restroom blocks. Ours was always clean and functional; although, the floor needed repainting. All the restroom necessities like paper, hand drier, soap, shower soap dish and clothes hooks, etc were present. There is no curtain between the shower stall and dressing area; since the water comes out of a non-adjustable nozzle with the approximate force of a fire hose, make sure you put your towel and dry clothes out of the over spray area, and protect any sensitive body areas! There is even a foot-washing basin, but no outside sink for dish washing. The staffer we usually encountered was helpful, efficient, and a bit of a kidder. I was again amazed at how quiet and courteous most of the campers were. Patagonia Lake, like the other Arizona State Campgrounds we’ve stayed in this year, is very quiet and relaxing. The birding is excellent. Be aware that there is a campground store and gas station, with pretty high prices, but for any shopping you will probably have to drive about 15 miles to Patagonia, or 30 miles to Rio Rico. There are a coffee house (Gathering Grounds), a great little bakery (the Oven) and an eclectic/organic foods mart (Red Mountain) in Patagonia. There are big stores and cheaper prices in Rio Rico. We would very definitely return to this campground. We paid $25 per night for four nights.
03/2014
rating [ 9/10 ]
We stayed at this campground just behind the Safeway store in Benson six years ago. It is still nice, and the trees have grown some more, providing pretty good shade for most of the spaces. Much of the clientele appears to be snowbirds. The staff is, as before, friendly, efficient, helpful. The streets and most spaces are asphalt, and level, attractively, if sparsely, landscaped. There is a pool and a large rec room, as well as a kitchen/dining room available for group events, and lots of activities in the clubhouse. The restrooms are clean and comfortable. The dog walks are fenced with trash cans there. The worst thing about this campground is the WiFi, which is Tengonet. I just can’t say enough bad things about Tengonet. It is slow, buggy, aggravating, intrusive, and typically kicks you off just before you push “enter” to send the stuff you worked so hard to compose. The real draw for us at Butterfield is an actual observatory with a dome a 16” telescope that some universities would kill for. On clear nights when wind is not a problem, you can sign up for a chance to see some great views of the universe. Benson is on the railroad and has two road crossings, so if you are one of those bothered by train whistles, you may not enjoy that aspect. This is a nice campground, and the prices reflect that. We paid $36 per night for full hookups with a Passport card. We stayed a total of five nights in March. We would definitely come again just for the observatory experience, but Benson is also a good central location from which to see Tombstone, Bisbee, Sierra Vista, and things on the east side of Tucson.
03/2014
rating [ 9/10 ]
This RV campground/fast food/gas station is just off the main highway, about six miles from the Meteor Crater, and apparently all are run by the same corporation. When it comes to campgrounds in the middle of nowhere, we found this one a bit better than most. The campground is gated. The gravel spaces are relatively large, each with a picnic table shade tree, and there are even a few pines planted around. There are also three grassy public spaces, with benches and a jungle gym to play on. The rec room is large, comfortable, and open 7 to 7, with hot coffee first thing in the morning. There are several restroom/laundry buildings, including laundry facilities attached to the rec room. The restroom block we used had a small laundry, and five relatively modern, very clean, home-style bathrooms, each with toilet, sink, and shower. Oonly two were open in this particular block because there were very few campers this early in the season. The water took a while to get warm, but it got there. The staff were all first rate, helpful, and friendly, as are the staff down at the Meteor Crater itself. There is some road noise from the highway, especially noticeable in the late evening, and some distant train sound. This area can be quite windy in the spring, but we enjoyed two days of calm, clear weather. The campground water is from wells, and tastes good. There are two fenced dog walks with waste cans. The only problem we encountered was with the WiFi. It worked intermittently for us, and was buggy and slow. We stayed two nights using a water/electric site, and paid $29/night with a Good Sam card. We would stay here again if we were in the Winslow area, or when we revisit the Meteor Crater, which is really well worth the trip.
03/2014
rating [ 8/10 ]
. This was our first experience with the Arizona State Parks system, and we were impressed. Situated a little out of the pleasant little town of Cottonwood, across the Verde River, DHRSP has asphalt roads, lots of hiking trails, good birding, some fishable ponds, and even horses and a wrangler available. The staff was uniformly great. We had a nearly level, gravel, water/electric site in “Quail” loop. The entire park area, although filled to capacity, was clean, well-maintained, and very quiet. Though the campground was full, the restrooms were never crowded or malfunctioning. We are finding that each State Park has its small eccentricities; our restroom at DHRSP had no soap dispensers, and no place in the shower stall to put a bar of soap. There is no official dog walk; guests are asked to pick up after their dogs, and seemed to be quite good about it. The only real downside we found was lack of WiFi. There is a public Starbucks/Safeway WiFi in town. Our experience at DHRSP convinced us to stay in Arizona State Parks whenever possible, and we definitely will stay again at DHRSP. We stayed four nights in an Aliner popupand paid $31 per night ($30 per night plus a $5 reservation fee). Our "8" rating on the various AZ State Parks is for the stuff we find most important, which does not include clubhouses, tv, WiFi, or sewer hookups.
03/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
Holbrook never appears to have much going on, and is not a shopping mecca, but it is the nearest town to Petrified Forest National Park. It can be very windy here; although, it was calm when we visited this time. The OK RV Park looks better than it did when I was through about seven years ago, so we gave it a try. The park is far enough off the freeway and the rails to be relatively quiet. You will hear trains in the distance. The staff were friendly, efficient, and helpful, and gave us useful information about local businesses. As is typical of southwestern desert campgrounds, the roads and level sites are gravel, although some have concrete pads between them. The place apparently changed hands a few years ago, and the current owner is slowly making improvements. Some trees have been replaced and all appear to be alive. The spaces are ample, quite long, and many are rather wide. You could park a sixty-footer with a toad in the one we got. There are codes for the WiFi which works well, but is a bit slow at times. The restrooms we used are a block with two each mens and womens. The mens room I used had two toilets, two showers, two sinks and a urinal. The restrooms are older, and somewhat run down. However, everything was clean and worked properly. The restrooms we used are not really well-adapted to handicapped use, but others in the campground may be. The dog walk is along an unpaved road and grassy field running along the back of the park. Remember that Arizona does not use Daylight Saving Time, but stays on Mountain Standard Time all year. This appears to be a point of pride with Arizonans. We stayed two nights. We would stay here again if in Holbrook. We paid $54 for two nights ($27 per night) with a Good Sam card.
03/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
Checking the reviews before staying at this campground, I noted that previous reviewers had complained about the pay showers, dirty restrooms, and high prices. However, this was the closest private campground with hookups/restrooms/showers to Grand Canyon National Park. This quiet campground is located behind the General Store in Tusayan, about a half a block east of the main street, and about four miles south of the south entrance to Grand Canyon National Park. The spaces are gravelly, relatively level, some with some small patches of grasses, picnic tables, some sites with small shade trees, a few sites with pines. We stayed two nights in mid-March, before the tourist season. The staff were very friendly and helpful, and knowledgeable about what services were available in town. The sites appear to be mostly pull-through. The WiFi worked very well. The restrooms are older block buildings. I saw at least four; the one we used was clean and trouble-free. The mens restroom had two each sinks, toilets, and shower stalls. Each shower stall consisted of the shower stall itself plus a small ate-chamber for dressing. A shower cost $2 (put in eight quarters) for eight minutes; it is not unusual to encounter pay showers in areas where water is limited or expensive. The hot water was plenty hot, and eight minutes is quite a long shower (I’ve seen paid the same price for four minute showers). The shower water pressure was quite low, and I first wondered if I was going to get wet all over, but found the eight minutes more than ample to deal with this issue. The area is at high elevation (above 7000 ft), and arid, with limited water supplies (the campground depends on a well). The restrooms were cleaned daily. The price for a 30 amp site with full hookups was $34 per night, pre-season. Although the full hookup part was moot, since the water was turned off to avoid freezing the pipes at night. We found Grand Canyon Camper Village a pleasant surprise, but I am sure that if we arrived at this or any other campground during heavy use periods, we could find things to complain about. The pizza place attached to the General Store and the RP Stage stop (coffee house) both had good food at reasonable prices. A note to fellow travelers: campgrounds in National Park gateway communities have something of a captive clientele, and so are often more expensive than the norm, and have fewer amenities. They also get very heavy, and often thoughtless use during tourist season, leading to plumbing and trash problems. During our stay, more than one person pulled in quite late then left early and didn’t pay for their stay. It only takes one thoughtless or malicious idiot to jam up a toilet so nobody can use it. Water, electricity, WiFi time, and general maintenance all cost money.
03/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
We’ve stayed here several times. The guests have always been quiet and friendly, mostly older folks. We considered trying a different campground this trip, but of the other two options, one looked pretty bad from the road and the other was closed. The gravel spaces, all pull-throughs, are level, each with a picnic table and (most) with small shade trees, and are large enough to park a vehicle beside your trailer. The small pond that a previous reviewer found choked with weeds is cleaned up, and being utilized by ducks, grebes, and other birds. The restroom facilities are rather novel, but work well. There is a stucco building with a creaky floor that feels almost like a trailer floor; it has a small central reading room with couch & chairs, pay phone, and book shelf. Surrounding the central room are the doors to four separate, clean, home-style restrooms with about 1950s décor, each with toilet, sink, and small shower stall. These facilities are more than adequate for the campground, which has only a couple of dozen spaces. The Cadillac Ranch is currently for sale by the daughter of the owner, who had passed away since we last stayed here. I hope someone steps up and buys this little campground, and keeps it going. We stayed with electric only. On-site water was available during the day, but had to be turned off at night due to freezing temperatures. We paid $27 (two nights at $55). This would be my pick when we come to Bluff again.
03/2014
rating [ 7/10 ]
On north end of town, out of the bustle. New owners just trying to open & get up to speed for the spring rush. Gated. Surrounded by tall red cliffs and far enough from town that the stars are quite bright. It is Moab. I is sandy desert. The fenced dog walk is sand, and had a scoop and waste can. Full hookups sites have postage stamp size grass lawns and shade trees. The nice-sized tent and water electric only sites are level sand pads enclosed in railroad ties, with picnic table, and some small shade trees. There is a row of picnic tables with sun shades. There was some noise from the main highway running through Moab; it was mostly noticeable before dawn. The staff was very friendly, and somewhat harried as they tried to get everything organized and running. We did not try the WiFi, but it apparently is Tengonet, so ‘nuff said. The restrooms are one really nice thing about this campground. Having stayed in some campgrounds that had mens restrooms with two stalls, two showers and a urinal to service 200 spaces, I was very impressed with the ample facilities here. Moab gets crazy busy about mid-March, and the party continues all summer. Wwaiting in line for a shower, or worse, is not something I enjoy. The mens’ restroom I used, associated with the cabins and tent/electric only sites, was very clean and neat, well-lit, and had six sinks, six stalls, three urinals, and five showers! The only thing I thought was a little strange was that the shower I used had no ledge for soap. Hotels and RV parks are the growth industry in Moab, New ones are going in all the time. From what I’ve seen, the better parks currently are at the north end of town, out of the crazy traffic and near the Colorado River. I’d be tempted to stay in this one again, just for the restrooms. We stayed with electric only . We paid $31 with a Good Sam card.
09/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This pretty, scenic Good Sam park is only about one mile east of the entrance the Mesa Verde National Park. It is quiet except for a little highway noise, shady, and has first class restrooms and laundry setup. The big, nice shower stalls have large privacy areas. Unfortunately, a few idiots shut down the government the day after we arrived, so we were unable to spend as much time here as we expected. We’d like to go back and stay longer at another time. We stayed one night in an Aliner popup, and paid $33 with a Good Sam card.
09/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
A typical KOA, a bit pricy, nicely groomed and with escorts, professional, but just a bit sterile. Restrooms are of course fine, but with possibly the smallest shower stalls I’ve seen anywhere (although they do have privacy areas); it can be a real trick to reach some of your body parts without dinging your elbows. Breakfast was served a reasonable charge Saturday & Sunday. The park was relatively shady and quiet, and really full of big rigs. We stayed two nights in an Aliner popup and paid $35 per night with a KOA card.
09/2013
rating [ 6/10 ]
Magdalena is the closest town to the Very Large Array Radio Telescope, a scientific wonder that every one ought to see. The town is about five blocks long, and the Magdalena City Marshall patrolled the town regularly. The Western Motel in Magdalena is old, has seen better days, but has recently been purchased by a young couple who has big plans to make it a thriving concern…and are working every day at improvements. The motel had a half-dozen small, plain rooms; the RV park is a walled-in half-acre of gravel out back, with maybe a full dozen hookups. We shared the RV portion with a semi-permanent mobile home, a big rig, a 26-foot tow-behind, and two old cars. The motel & RV park are, like the town itself, at first glance unprepossessing, and I’d not be writing this, except that I find some business owners go out of their way to “show willing” where their customers are concerned, and I’d a lot rather stay at one of those places than at some fancy joint that doesn’t know (or care) what space you are in. The co-owner showed us the park, and mentioned that there were no toilet or shower facilities for the RV area. When I explained that wouldn’t work for us, she gave us the key to one of the unrented motel rooms, and told us to feel free to use whatever we needed in there during our stay, at no charge. Since I got a look at the motel room, I can tell you it was fairly small, but with a king-size bed; the bathroom facilities had been upgraded, and worked well. The shower was small, built for smaller previous generations of Americans. The room and bathroom were very clean and neat, and nicely decorated with a home-maker’s touch. The hookups all worked well. The whole town went quiet after about 9 PM. We stayed one night in an Aliner popup, and paid the standard rate of $25; I noted a Passport sign on the wall, and probably could have got a lower price, but I thought that free motel room access deserved the full price. We found some good, attractively plated food at the Bear Mountain Café & Visitor Center.
09/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
This Good Sam park is of the highway on a ridge, in juniper woodland, just below the old city cemetery. It has level gravel spaces, with wood wall “ells” for shade and wind protection, and a mixed ground cover of native and introduced species. There are numerous historic artifacts on display throughout the park (a windmill, a wooden water tower, wagons, a fresno and other and horse-drawn farm equipment). The whole park is very clean and neat, and quiet (even the dogs tended to be quiet). Our hostess was very friendly and helpful. Cell phone worked fine; I did not use the free Wi-Fi. The restrooms consist of four very clean, individual home-style bathrooms, each with a modern sink, mirror, soap dispenser, paper towel dispenser, a toilet, and a large shower. The restrooms are locked & coded, and show an “occupied” flag when in use. This is not a “kids” park, with all sorts of playground equipment, nor does it appear that pancake breakfasts or barbeque evenings are held. It is just a really nice, quiet, peaceful place to stay. Note: If you are traveling with a furry friend and need doggy day care, we can highly recommend Mis Amigos, a couple of miles east back down the highway…it is an excellent facility. We travel in an in an Aliner popup trailer. We paid $30 for two nights, using our Passport card, staying the 24th & 25th of September 2013, then stayed another night on the Good Sam card for $30; this worked out to $20 per night. For our needs, this park is perhaps the best we have stayed in.
09/2013
rating [ 6/10 ]
This Good Sam RV park and mobile home community is not as upscale as the advertising might suggest, although it may be the best choice in Alamogordo at present. The park, centrally located in Alamogordo, has paved level spaces and asphalt roads & aprons, picnic tables in sheltered alcoves of decorative block, and nearly all the sites have nice shade trees. It is relatively quiet, except for various small dogs, and occasional trains (the train situation would be the same for any RV park along the main thoroughfare, since the tracks run parallel to the road through the area). Cell phone works fine and I think I used the Wi-Fi once, successfully. The hostess was friendly, as was the rest of the staff. There is a swimming pool with grassy area, and a large clubhouse area with a big-screen TV and a paperback book library. Now for the down sides. Our space had hordes of micro-ants, which tried every access point to infest our trailer…we had to buy some pesticide and spray frequently (we were told that the ants are only a problem after rains). There is one mens restroom and one women's restroom for eighty spaces and the pool; neither restroom is new, although they are kept clean. The mens restroom has one urinal, one toilet, one sink, and one rather small shower, which is located so that anyone using the other facilities has to walk back and forth through the area in front of the shower, where you left your clothes and towel when you got into the shower. At night, you need to use a key to open a locked gate at the swimming pool, and then use the key again to get into the restroom. Worse, there is a way for the cleaning staff to lock the restrooms from the inside; some guests have discovered this, and lock out everyone else who needs the facility while they are in there. Three times during our stay there were waiting lines at the restrooms. I wish I could give this park a better review; it just needs some money spent on improvements. We stayed five days in an Aliner popup. We paid about $29 per night with a Good Sam card.
09/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
The big attraction here is a really nice, really big, delightfully warm swimming pool in the middle of nowhere, with a view to the Sand Dunes. The pool is filled from a continuously flowing artesian well that supplies water at 118 degrees Fahrenheit (The pool temperature is around 98 degrees). Note: the pool is closed for cleaning on Thursdays, open to around 10 PM other days. A sandwich bar at the pool has a wide range of fast foods, including what must be the only Calamari available in southern Colorado. The park has a shelter belt of poplars, and trees between the sites, a blessing in the middle of the high, flat, mostly treeless, quite windy San Luis Valley. There are restrooms & showers in the pool dressing rooms, and also a pair of home-style restrooms with showers in the laundry building, which is open 24 hours (there are no RV sites very close to the restrooms). There are ten level gravel RV sites with grass lawns, picnic tables, water & electric service; people who are staying in the RV sites get to swim at half price. There are also about ten tent-camping sites, and a couple of rental cabins. Everything is very clean; the staff members are all friendly & helpful. The staff said the free Wi-Fi might not work unless a set up near the pool area, but it worked fine at the RV space I was in. There is cell phone reception. We paid $25 for one night, staying here in an Aliner popup trailer on September 18th, 2013.
09/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is in an industrial area on the east side of Casper, along the North Platte River. Flights of geese were passing overhead. The gravel spaces are level, each with astroturf pad and picnic table. The restrooms are in good shape, two “home style” restrooms in the office building, then a separate building with group shower/restrooms. The host was friendly & helpful. The campground was almost entirely full of with pipeline workers employed on a nearby project. In spite of this (and the fact it was a Saturday night), the campground was relatively quiet; the only noise was from the midnight shift at a nearby industrial building. It rained steadily during the night. I did not try the Wi-Fi. Cell phone reception was good. We stayed in an Aliner popup on September 14th, 2013; the rate (with a Good Sam card) was $19. We’d like to go stay again when the weather is better and the campground less crowded; it would be a good place to stay if you were floating the river.
09/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This campground is situated in an open grove on a flat along the White River a couple of miles east of the town of Interior, SD. The gravel spaces are level, with surrounding grassy areas . The staff were friendly and helpful; the restrooms were fine. The campground is quiet. I did not try the Wi-Fi. Cell phone reception is very poor; you may need to go up to the road to make calls. We stayed in an Aliner popup on September 13th, 2013 and were planning on staying the 14th ( which would have been a free night), but had another commitment come up, so we only stayed one night. The rate was $26 for the one night with a KOA card. We would definitely stay there again when we return to the Badlands area in the future.
09/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
A few miles south of Hot Springs, this quiet campground is situated on a slope in Ponderosa pine and juniper, and very convenient to many attractions in the Hot Springs area. The staff were very friendly and helpful, with lots of info on things to do (and there are lots). The restrooms were very clean and nicely appointed. The dirt/gravel spaces are rather narrow, although with all the trees, you don’t see a lot of spaces at once. The spaces we saw are pretty level from side to side, but slope substantially uphill from front to back; they could present a challenge for long, low-slung rigs. Wi-Fi is available and worked fine at our spot. The rate was $31 with a KOA card. We stayed in an Aliner popup on September 12th, 2013; we will definitely stay there again when we return to the Hot Springs area.
09/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This city park/campground, operated by the City of Gering, must be the best-kept secret around. It is on a low hill with a view off to the prairie on the east. The level, paved pad spaces with grassy areas are arranged around a large, grassy common expanse, with scattered trees, and a view of Scotts Bluff nearby to the west. There is playground equipment in the city park portion. The park is very quiet. The restrooms are kept very clean; the automatic flush feature was acting up when we were there…which just meant you had to push a button to flush. The shower areas are the only weak point…due to space limitations there is only a curtain on a metal hoop (in front of each shower) for a dressing area. The staff was very friendly & helpful, and had tons of info about things to see & do in the area. We stayed two nights, Sept 10th & 11th 2013, in an Aliner popup trailer. The rate was $24 per night with a Good Sam card for full hookups (no cable), Free Wi-Fi. A tip: the Gering bakery a couple of miles northeast has lots of tasty pastries.
09/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
A small, intimate, older park (about a dozen spaces), and not a lot of amenities, handily located for visiting historic sites around Fort Laramie. We looked at a campground a few miles north in Guernsey, but it was knee-deep in mosquitoes. The park has grassy spaces with picnic tables and level gravel parking pads under big old shade trees. The home-style restrooms (one for men & one for women, each with a shower) are spic and span clean, stocked with soap, paper towels, toilet paper, and discardable paper mats for the shower floor. The owner-manager, was friendly and down-to-earth. The complimentary packet we received on check-in was the most useful packet of its kind we have ever received, and owner-manager was a fountain of information on local attractions. The park was very quiet except for the trains. If you find train noises disturbing, this is not the campground for you. On the other hand, if you are a train aficionado, or you have a unit with excellent sound-proofing, you won’t mind the trains, which come through every hour or so, giving the obligatory long-short-long-long whistle blasts as they approach the highway intersection beside the campground. We camped September 9th 2013 in an Aliner popup trailer. We paid $15 (plus a refundable $5 fee for the restroom key) with a Passport card, for full hookups (no cable); free Wi-Fi was available, but we did not have time to try it. We would certainly stay at the Chuckwagon RV park again if visiting the Fort Laramie area.
03/2013
rating [ 1/10 ]
We had intended to stay here, but when we arrived with our Aliner popup trailer on the afternoon of 03/07/2013, we were informed that they didn’t want our kind (not entirely self-contained); this is not mentioned in their glowing ads and reviews online, some of which brag about clean restrooms and showers. Other places that may cater largely to self-contained outfits generally find ways to accommodate us non-self-contained travelers; this Best Western didn’t bother. In response to my next question (could they recommend a place in town?), I was informed that “maybe some other places don’t have rules like we do…you’ll have to look around.” I didn’t like their attitude, and would not stay here, ever. Further, I believe that if a campground allows only self-contained units, that fact ought to be clearly and prominently posted online and in ads, so that we don’t waste our time considering it in the first place.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a very small, (22 spaces) RV park in the tiny town of Kanarraville UT, about six miles north of the Kolob Canyon visitor center. Don’t look for amenities (kiddy playgrounds, convenience stores, etc.) in either the town or the campground. Those services are available 10-15 miles north in Cedar City. We stopped here because we wanted to wander around in Kolob Canyon in the evening, and because we like quiet, out-of-the-way places. The owners were very friendly and laid back. There was no freeway noise, and a nice view of mountain cliffs to the east. The spaces are nearly all small, this is not a campground for big rigs. Our concrete pad was perfectly level; we had our own lawn patch and picnic table. The campground has a small common room with lots of books, and we were offered use of the gas grill on the patio. I used the Wi-Fi briefly to deal with email, and it worked fine. The restroom facility is also small (the Men's had one urinal, two fairly small stalls, two showers, and two sinks), but more than adequate for a 22-space campground. The restrooms were clean and homey (rugs on the floor, pictures on the walls etc.) with plenty of hot water. We thought this place was great, and would stay here any time. We travel with a dog, and stayed one night.
03/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
This town is the gateway to Joshua Tree National Park.This RV park is an older resort/golf course, with a fair number of long-term residents associated with the big Marine base here. The main building is modern and in good shape. The Wi-Fi was free, functional, and worked pretty well. There is a huge indoor pool, a bit chilly, but very roomy. The restrooms and showers are nice (I am told that the stalls in the womens’ are quite narrow and small). The restroom facilities seem a bit minimal for the number of RV spaces; however, we experienced no delays. The staff were friendly, cheerful and helpful, as were the townfolk. Many of the available lots are fairly small, with concrete pads and gravel on the remaining surface. The place is relatively quiet at night, although since it is on one of the access roads to the Marine base, there is some relatively early traffic, including at least one 5:00 AM motorcycle. We would be willing to stay here again if we were in the area.
03/2013
rating [ 5/10 ]
This park appears from the architecture to have many years ago been a KOA. The staff person was a little unsure of what he was doing. The computer system swore that our internet provider did not exist, so we didn't try the WiFi, which would have cost extra, anyway. The office seems to close relatively early and open late. We were put in a level, concrete-pad, “overflow” space with power and water. Water pressure is extremely high here, and you are warned when you come in to have a good pressure regulator to avoid blowing your plumbing system, so plan ahead. The restrooms (in the office building) had recently been refurbished, and were clean and well-cared for. The guests were quiet and most of their dogs were quiet. This was the most expensive (and probably the least desirable) spot we stayed in during our trip, costing $47 for one night.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is an older park up a little canyon in rolling hills a few miles east of San Diego. The park is quiet, friendly, and safe-feeling. The guests were quiet and friendly. There are lots of social activities going on all the time. Space size varies considerably; the spaces in our area were a bit tight, so look at a campground map when selecting a site, and be aware that a big rig might be a challenge. Although the park has many long-stay self-contained units, it does allow non-self-contained for short stays, which we very much appreciated. The WiFi connection is through Tengointernet, and unlike some places in our experience, it actually works here. The staff were cheerful, friendly, extremely helpful, making it a pleasure to stay. If you set out a propane bottle to be filled, it is taken care of before you know it. The buildings and grounds are very well maintained. A cautionary note: the restrooms are cleaned (very well) between 6:30 and 8:30 every morning…this could conflict with your needs or schedule, so plan accordingly. The landscaping is lovely, the birding is good, the morning and evening light on the palms and surrounding mountains was spectacular. There is a good, simple Italian restaurant about a quarter-mile down the canyon road. We got a bargain rate of four nights for the price of three, paying $132 for four nights with a Good Sam card. This is the kind of park we prefer, away from town yet close to amenities, quiet, pretty, clean, friendly. We look forward to staying there again if we get back to the San Diego area.
03/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
This is an asphalt parking lot with full hookups in the middle of downtown Pahrump (in this part of the world, spaces are going to be gravel, dirt, concrete or asphalt; lawn and tree county it ain’t). The RV Park is about a hundred yards away from the casino. The lot slopes for drainage, so be sure to carry 2-3” of leveling blocks. Select your space carefully (the host can help) if you want your front door closer to the ground, rather than higher. There is some landscaping and lamp posts around the perimeter, and the restrooms/laundry room, an ice machine in the laundry room, and a sand dog walk area with a bag dispenser. The spaces are big enough for a big rig plus ample parking for the tow vehicle or the toad. There is a full-time host onsite, and I never saw any part of the facility dirty or unsightly. The spotless restrooms are among the best we've seen for availability, cleanliness, and maintenance; they are cleaned in the middle of the night, so you are unlikely to encounter any “down time” if you are on a schedule. The Wi-Fi is superb, simple, fast, dependable, and free. The guests are quiet and courteous, and we noticed very little road noise, although helicopters sometimes fly over after dark but before about 9:30 PM. The town in general seems friendly, with reasonable prices (gas here was nearly a dollar less than over the border in California). If your interests run to the out-of doors, Pahrump is pretty centrally located to reach most of Death Valley, Ash Meadows, several sand dunes areas, Red Rock Park, Las Vegas, and a ghost town on day trips. The rates were $25/night, or $152/week (or $375/month, and there are some long-stay residents). I can only rate this park as a nine compared with some parks in more glamorous areas, but I'd give it a ten for western Nevada and eastern California parks. Although we don’t typically stay in parking-lot type sites, or in the middle of towns, this will definitely be our first choice when we come again.
03/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
This older campground is just coming into the KOA system. It is actually located in Leeds, UT, a few miles north of and above St George, where the days and nights aren’t quite so hot. The fairly level gravel sites are arrayed in tiers up a slope. Although all sorts of rigs were present, some of the spaces might be a driving challenge for big rigs. The comfortable restroom/shower facilities (the Mens’ room had 6 showers, 8 sinks, 2 stalls and 2 urinals) are clean, and have recently been repainted. The staff was cheerful, friendly, helpful, efficient, and gave good advice on local places. We did not try the WiFi. The guests were quiet and friendly. There is a little night time traffic noise from the freeway about ¼ mile across the canyon. One caution: the campground is not exactly “on the shore of Quail Creek Lake”, but there are plenty of other things to do. Photographers will enjoy the abandoned historic stone buildings, and the Silver Reef Café on the other end of Leeds is a very good soup/salad/sandwich place (my salad had lots of big chunks of blue cheese in the blue cheese dressing), with some neat western art. We travel with an Aliner popup trailer and a dog, and will definitely stay here again if in the area.
09/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is adjacent to the Green River in an area of upscale industrial parks; a Starbuck and a barbeque place are a mile or so east. Although located on a major thoroughfare (212th street), the park is fairly quiet at night. The location is handy for exploring the Seattle/Tacoma area. There is a handy dog boarding kennel about a quarter mile away, across the river. The sites are grassy and shaded, but the sites we stayed in were rather small. The staff was very helpful and accommodating. The restrooms and showers were clean, but not sparkling. The rate (we paid $42 with a KOA card) seems a bit steep, although we've found that Seattle in general seems expensive. We would not be averse to staying here again, but next time we might look also around for alternative campgrounds that fit our plans.
10/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
This rustic campground is adjacent to orchards and Maryhill State Park, on the north bank of the Columbia River, across the bridge from Biggs, Oregon. There are several fruit stands in walking distance. The place was good for bird watching, and has some nice photo opportunities. We stayed on September 16th, and liked it so much that we came back on October 1st. All the spots are shady, some with river frontage; there are gravel parking slots and large, grassy lawns. The restrooms are not fancy, but are clean and handy, although the dressing area for the showers is open to the whole restroom (get over it...you had to share at school, didn’t you?). There are no laundry facilities. The hosts spent a lot of time out on their lawn visiting with guests and answering questions. The campground is remarkably quiet considering that it shares the canyon at this point with the Columbia River, an Oregon freeway (84) and truck stop (Biggs), a major highway (14), and railroad tracks on both sides of the river. We were aware of occasional night train noise from the tracks on our side of the river. We really liked this campground, and would go out of our way to stay here again.
09/2012
rating [ 6/10 ]
This park is under large trees, just behind the Packwood town library. There is a good little coffee house right across the street and a good burger place (the one with the skis) just down the highway to the south. The elderly campground operator (anyone who looks older than I is elderly) was initially taciturn, but a nice fellow. We had two rigs (my son was traveling with me) and wanted to have spaces together, so the operator set us up in a grassy, less formal area with hookups, where my son had an elk follow him to the restroom. This park is older, rustic, and has some minor maintenance problems. The restrooms are clean, and are sufficient if not luxurious (the mens’ restroom had two each shower stalls, toilet stalls, and sinks, no urinals and no soap, but the showers had plenty of nice, hot water under good pressure.) The regular rate seems a bit high, but I paid $15 with a Passport America card, and considered the park a good value for that price.
09/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
We picked this campground after reading online reviews of others in the area. Close (ca. 5 miles) to the town of Port Angeles and the entrance to Olympic National Park, this is a nice, clean, quiet, rural RV park built on a slope, with wildlife, birds, a garden, and a duck pond. A pleasant lady who is one of the owners has posted lots of signs and rule sheets prohibiting activities that any idiot ought to know better than to do. Admittedly, a lot of idiots don’t seem to know better. The restrooms and showers are clean. The rate we paid ($36 with a Good Sam card) was not too unreasonable for a campground that close to the National Park. We would probably stay here again if we were in the area.
09/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
We picked this park after driving around Long Beach and looking at the available campground options, most of which either looked pretty run-down or were quite expensive. It has good-sized, dry, gravel and grass sites with open shade. The grounds were neat, the restrooms and showers nice looking, clean, and in good shape. The staffer on duty was very pleasant and helpful. We paid $18 with a Passport America card, and felt this was good value for the money. If we were to stay in the Long Beach area again (not likely), this would be our "go-to" park for at least the first night.
10/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
This KOA is quite reasonably priced, considering the landscaping, concrete aprons, street lamps, and other amenities. Some musicians had a jam session going in the clubhouse. One of my pet peeves about KOAs in general is that their (outdoor) pools are almost always closed during the season we travel, but they still are charging relatively high rates. The Boise/Meridian KOA has an indoor pool and hot tub, open all year, that are accessible from outside or from within the clubhouse. The clubhouse, restrooms and showers were all in excellent shape and sparkling clean. The staff was friendly and helpful. All things considered, the park is a good value for the $33.50 we paid (with a KOA card.)
09/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
We arrived late on Saturday afternoon towing an A-liner Classic. The park was quite full, since 19 spaces were occupied by an Airstream owners get-together and an antique car show was also going on in town. We were offered (and gratefully accepted) an unshaded gravel site with water and electric located against the back fence, with a nice view across open pastureland to the Snake River Canyon. The Hagerman RV Village is a smaller, older, shady, quiet, clean park at the edge of town. I especially liked the showers. The rate was $22.50 with a Good Sam card. We would definitely stay here again if we were in the area.
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