206669 User submitted reviews online!!
11/2012
rating [ 9/10 ]
Anastasia State Park has a huge campground. It is a mix of RVs and tents. The park is well run. Restrooms were clean. All sites are shaded. Anastasia is an excellent base to explore St. Augustine and, of course, to use the state park's beach. Wi-Fi is available at the camp store/cafe at the beach (free).
11/2012
rating [ 10/10 ]
Myakka River is a really nice state park with a really nice campground. There are three separate campground areas in the park. "Palmetto Ridge" is the new section that is geared toward large RVs. Palmetto Ridge has full water, electric, and sewer at all sites. Some sites are pull-through. The sites at Palmetto Ridge are gravel. "Old Prairie" and "Big Flats" are the older sections. These are smaller areas and don't have sewer hook ups. Old Prairie is near the entrance (across from Palmetto Ridge). Big Flats is near the lake. The problem with the older sections is that there is not much buffer between camp sites. Mostly just a wood fence section separating the sites.
08/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
Leonard Harrison state part has a rather small campground. A campground map is available from the Pennsylvania State Parks web site. All non-electric sites are among trees. Sites 12, 14, and 19 are among some tall pine trees and are great for hammocks. The electric sites (except for 23 and 25) are in the open. Avoid site 6, it is right next to the pathway to the bath house. The bath house is fairly new. There is only one shower in each of the men's and women's rooms. There is a family rest room that also has an accessible shower.
06/2012
rating [ 7/10 ]
Ricketts Glen is a really nice state park with over 20 waterfalls and a small lake with boat rentals and a beach. There are two campground sections. One has some sites that are waterfront. That section is the most crowded. I stayed in the other section since no waterfront sites were available anyway. The bath houses were functional and reasonably clean, not brand new. The only real problem is that the shower water temp constantly fluctuated greatly. Tent camping is the most common since sites don't have water or electric. The sites are too small for anything but small trailers like pop-ups or mini-trailers.
09/2008
rating [ 8/10 ]
This campground is for tents only! You cannot drive directly to your site, you have to park in a lot just outside the campground and carry in your gear. (Some free carts are available to help.) The parking lot is very close to the sites, so you don't have to walk far. There are only 10 sites, the farthest is probably only about 500 feet from the parking. The sites are a little "over-processed" for me. The sites are bounded in by railroad ties and filled in with small pebbles. I prefer just the natural dirt. But, the sites are built-up to be perfectly level and the pebbles alleviate any drainage or mud problems. The bath house is very new with everything you could need. There are four very nice showers with ample hot water - a very good ratio considering the campground has just 10 sites. The campground does not provide any trash facilities at all, you have to take all your trash with you. Not a huge problem, but kind of annoying in the bathroom when you have to carry out your used dental floss. (The woman's restroom does have a sanitary napkin disposal.) Location is right on the river, with access for canoes. Two canoe rental companies are also close by if you don't have your own. There are no nearby restaurants or stores. Closest is in Front Royal.
09/2008
rating [ 2/10 ]
Yuck! Watermelon Park has potential, but needs new management. Arrived at 6:30 PM, the camp store was closed, nobody at the check-in booth, no instructions on what to do for late check in. Took a peek at the shower building and promptly got the heck out of there. A filthy broken down building with no working lights, no hardware on the bathroom stalls. Too bad because, aside from being too far down a gravel road, the location is really nice - right along the river. Lots of sites, few trees. Might be okay if you have an RV and don't need to use the showers or bathrooms. I would recommend having a back-up option, though. The price is good, they charge by the person, not the site. $10 per person.
07/2007
rating [ 9/10 ]
Other reviewers are deriding Blue Rocks for being poor for the RVer. As a tent camper, things are a lot different. This privately-run campground has qualities that make it seem like a state park in many ways. I would have to agree that the narrow dirt (rocky) roads through the campground are not at all appropriate for any kind of RV. I saw several people with pop-up trailers that were going through okay, but I wouldn't want to do it with anything larger. The web site of the campground clearly states that it is geared for the tent camper, so large RVers should not be surprised that it is not a paved parking lot with pull-through sites and poles to hang Christmas lights. Most sites don't have any hookups and there are very few common water spigots. If you are in a tent, pickup, or van, then the place is great. It is very wooded, with a lot of secluded sites and a natural ambiance. Then there is the excellent hike up to the Appalachian Trail, which goes past the impressive glacial boulder field. When you hit the Appalachian Trail (about a mile of fairly strenuous hiking), turn right and you will soon come to Pulpit rock overlook which is very impressive and worth the hike. You can actually see the glacier field and campground road that crosses it below. (Remember to turn right, the campground's map doesn't make this clear.) Not so nice was the availability of the shower houses. If you are in one of the secluded areas, you are far from a shower (literally a 15 minute walk). There is some parking for the shower house near the entrance, so you can drive there... but driving around on the narrow campground roads is not something you want to do often... plus it ruins the experience. The shower houses are okay, not great, but reasonably clean. The one farther out toward the glacier is just a converted trailer with push-button showers that are way too small, so stick with the one near the entrance. There are some pit toilets scattered throughout for when you need to go in the middle of the night. A lot of the campers seem to own or rent little golf carts and drive them around for reasons I couldn't figure out. If it weren't for the little carts riding by every 10 minutes, there would have been hardly any traffic. There is a playground, pool, and store near the entrance... but the best part of this campground is the seclusion and natural beauty. If you are only interested in activities, other privately run campgrounds will do just as well... and those are a dime a dozen. This one is unique for its excellent hike and natural beauty.
06/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
The campground is a mix of wooded and semi-open sites. There is one bathhouse which is reasonably well maintained. I find many of the sites are too close together, so choose wisely when reserving. The state park itself is not that appealing. There is nothing wrong with it, but it is just a small lake and simple lake activities and nothing more.
06/2007
rating [ 7/10 ]
Trap Pond campground is well run by the state. It sits on one edge of a lake. A short walk to the opposite bank of the lake you can rent canoes and paddle boats, which makes for a nice time because the far end of the cypress lake is quite beautiful. A canoe is a good choice because you can go back quite far on "canoe trails" as they call them. The campground itself is wooded and well maintained with adequate facilities. My only complaint would be that, like other Delaware state parks, the camp sites are a little close to each other. This was a problem on my weekend trip because the campground was full and there wasn't a lot of space to buffer you from the nearby kids. We had a a lot of kids tromping through our campsite unsupervised. If that is a problem, I would recommend taking a site on the far end away from the bathhouses and playground. At $27/night for out of state residents, the price is a bit steep, too. But the campground fills up so I guess the market can easily bear that amount. It was interesting that, while the campground was full, the park itself wasn't very busy. Clearly a lot of people camping there had no interest in the park itself. Just sitting all day at your picnic table stuffing your face all day isn't my style. But I can tell you it was for a lot of people camping last June.
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