224206 User submitted reviews online!!
11/2013
rating [ 10/10 ]
Update to my last review from May 2011 - They now have a functioning dump site! Also, they are now a year-round reservation site, so no more first-come, first-served sites during the 'off season'. Everything else remains the same as previously noted. If you are looking to become a camp host, this is a great park to try your hand at it.
04/2013
rating [ 9/10 ]
Great park, lots of security, close enough to everything you'd want to see in Las Vegas but far enough away that it's nice and quiet (apart from the occasional F-18 or F-22). We arrived late into the Las Vegas area (after 11p) and had to do some research on how to get into the FamCamp. DO NOT go straight into the Nellis Main Gate while you're on Craig Road. You'll enter off Range Road (directly across from Nellis AFB north gate) which is .6 miles north of the Main Gate. You then go around a weird loop to the right that circles back to the security gate (which is big enough to fit even semis). We pulled in about 1AM and the park has 4 hook-up sites behind the office for late arrivals as well as 2 more dry spots out front. I'd suggest parking up front and walk around the temp sites, because some folks leave their 'towed' attached and you will never be able to get around them. The front office is friendly, efficient and it's great that you get a free bag of ice daily. The gas station, commissary and other retail facilities are on the main side of the base, while housing, the VA hospital, (HUGE!) solar array and FamCamp are on the west side. The Base Police rolled through every few hours, and our neighbors ranged from rigs as small as 25 foot Terry Travel Trailers up to a Prevost Bus with an older Rolls-Royce as their towed! Every guest we spoke to during our stay was very nice and recommended different casinos, buffets and shows to see. We will definitely stay here again, probably during the NASCAR race since LVMS is two miles up the road.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Holiday Island Campground is a small park in the retirement community of the same name that sits north of Eureka Springs and east of Beaver. The park is best accessed from the Missouri side off 'FR2300' better known as 'Stateline Road', as the bridge from Beaver on AR-187 has a 11'6" and 10 ton limit. Even with taking the long way from the west, you still wonder if it is worth driving a 35ft Class A and Towed around the winding hills of southern Missouri between Roaring River State Park in MO and the H.I. campground. Personally, I'd say a small class A or fifth wheel were pushing the envelope, but the host was in a 35ft long 5th Wheel and a 38ft Class A pulled in the day after we did. Sites here had manageable slopes, (even with blocks under our front jacks, we still had trouble leveling and our front tires were 4" off the ground) but we could have picked a different spot and not had that issue. So, bring plenty of blocks to drive on for leveling. We had no OTA TV reception, and the cable TV never worked at our space, but we were there to see family and never really needed it beyond when we were getting ready before heading out for the day. Power was fine (works off the same grid as the adjacent houses) but water pressure was low (despite being at the bottom of the hill). Our Sprint and T-Mobile cells roamed with only two bars, while our AT&T cell had between 2 and 3 bars. At the top of the hill on Holiday Island Drive all had full bars and my AT&T aircard had 4g LTE. There is no Clear (WiMAX) service in the area. A short walk from the campground will put you at the White River, which flows from Beaver Lake to Missouri's Table Rock Lake. If you have a boat you tow behind you rig BRING IT! Table Rock has almost 3,000 miles of shoreline, numerous marinas that provide full services and will take you all the way to Branson. The community has a nice marina, plus a 9 and 18 hole golf course, community center with pool and several local stores and restaurants that will save you the drive to Eureka Springs. Reservations are made through the camp host between April and October, and the main office during the 'off season'. Property owners at H.I. are given lower rates, so they may want to make the reservation for you. As with any trip to the midwest, bring a emergency alert weather radio as storms in the region can be swift and vicious. Obey all posted speed limits as they change often, but the main concern is deer that pop out along the road and local deputies reportedly look for out-of-state plates.
04/2013
rating [ 7/10 ]
While Mingo is not a 'resort', it is a park with a lot more going for it than some of these reviews say. Yes, there are a lot of full-timers here, but their trailers appeared to be in good repair and roadworthy, so it doesn't detract from the park. Unlike other parks in the Tulsa area, you are not mixed in with Mobile Homes, and the neighbors are friendly and quiet. The concrete in some pads was cracked up, and ours was no exception, but it never impacted us (looked like a bad pour and age rather than neglect). We rolled in after 11P on a Sunday. The person we spoke to when we called earlier that day said she'd leave an information packet for us (they didn't). We called the contact number by the office door and the lady who answered came right up. She was happy to see us (despite the hour) and quickly checked us in. She provided a park map, area guide and WiFi info. She even piloted us to our spot so we could 'pull thru' another spot into ours (the spots are all back-in). We didn't have a "privacy fence" by our space, but we were pretty tightly packed in. That never mattered to us as we spent most of our time out with family and friends in town. There are railroad tracks a mile away, but we barely heard the whistles when we were there. The Tulsa International Airport is a few miles away, but there are very few night flights and aircraft rarely fly overhead. Neither planes, trains nor our neighbors autos woke us up. Water pressure is good, although Tulsa has slightly hard water. Radio & TV reception is great, and cable TV is available. There are trees in the park, but many campers we saw had their dishes out, so they do not disrupt service. The park has a small propane tank on site, so you do not need to go offsite to fill your tanks. The hookups are easy to reach, although the water is not on a riser but in a 'flower pot', buried below the frost line, so we had to use two short hoses to put our filter in line. WiFi is provided through Tengo, so it is throttled at 1Mbps. Passwords are available from the office, and we got one for each of our laptops. Service on our AT&T, Sprint & T-Mo cells was flawless. My AT&T card had 4G LTE service, and a neighbor said that VZW did as well. T-Mo supposedly does, but we didn't have a way of testing it. Sprint currently is building out their LTE network, but only 1/3 of Tulsa was lit up. There is no Clear (WiMAX) service.
04/2013
rating [ 8/10 ]
Nice park and the central location between Kalispell and Glacier gives those of us who brought a 'towed' a big advantage. We only stayed a night, during a freeze warning, so bring your heated hose, but the views of the mountains are amazing! Sites 12,13 and 79-84 have the best view as long as there is no one in the adjacent back-in sites. They all appear level and nicely graveled with healthy grass in between. Despite the initial impression from the 'long-term' campers, the park is well cared for and clean. Sites 1-70 sit amid the trees, so satellite users will want to use 71-89 (and maybe 90-97). I found the Wi-Fi to have good speeds and signal strength, with about 5 nodes throughout the park. Since it is a cable modem, (and uses a shared connection) when everyone gets on during the summer it will be slow. Had AT&T 4G (no LTE) on wireless card, and Sprint 4G phones always roamed on 3G. T-Mo phone roamed on AT&T. We'd stay here again.
05/2012
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a great, little, out of the way park. It sits about 30 minutes away from both Moses Lake and Ellensburg, and only has limited supplies at the local store and two gas stations, so get your supplies before you arrive. The entrance off Huntzinger Road is more of a U-turn than a sharp left, but the park roads are in good shape (except for a rough patch around space 29). The only issue I had staying here was dealing with the wind. It BLEW!! Our first day it was nice and calm, but started to pick up about 10pm. By 4am I was awakened by the slamming of our awning into it's supports as 50mph gusts tried to toss our 35ft rig on to its drivers side! After fighting with the retraction motor (on our automatic awning) between the gusts, I finally got it stored (with minimum damage). Our tent (that my daughter decided to use since it was warm) held up well as long as she and our two German Shepherds were inside. But as the wind picked back up the next day, it pulled the 3 windward stakes out of the ground and rolled over. That was just before a 4" thick, 15' long limb broke off the top of one tree and missed our neighbors 5th wheel by 6 inches in the constant 20mph gale. So, be aware of the wind, stay clear of the taller trees in it and RETRACT YOUR AWNING AFTER 3PM. With full hook-ups, my wife and I never used the campgrounds facilities, but my daughter did, and she reported that they were clean and in good repair, if a little dated in their look. Other than the wind, this is a great place to relax! There is no over the air TV signals, mainly due to the terrain, but there are good satellite sight lines at most spaces on the lower loop. My Verizon aircard had 4-bar coverage & my wife had a surprising 5-bars on TMobile. Both my daughter and I had only 2 bars on Sprint, but never lost signal. The boat launch has easy access, and we saw several Class A & C rigs putting ski-boats in the Columbia. It was also used by the Kittatas County Sheriff to put in their boat to assist a family who ran aground after their engine failed. Sheriff Deputies drove through at regular intervals, probably due to Parks Departments staffing cuts. There was a young coyote that came through our side of the park for a few minutes one evening (when the holiday weekend visitors had all left) - poor thing looked confused and headed back into the scrub after five minutes. The host mentioned that he had seen a herd of 25 Dall's Sheep in the gulley to the north of the park, and a Ranger told me that deer walk through occasionally as well. But, he added, it was rare to see critters when that wind was blowing.
04/2012
rating [ 5/10 ]
Not a bad place, but not great either. The lawns were maintained and it was clean with some very nice rigs staying here. A bonus points in my book. We only stayed there one night, and spent most of it visiting friends in town, so I was originally going to give it a 7, but dropped it to 5 as noted below. The park is pretty easy to get to from westbound Skelly Drive, but road construction makes it a long drive down the access road when approaching from eastbound. The park was quiet despite the nearness of both the Interstate and train tracks. The problems I had weren't major, but I would have planned my trip differently if we'd been forewarned. The cable at our site never worked, but the antenna picked up all the local stations fine, and we weren't there for TV. That said, I deducted the point because there was no response from the park when I called them about it and got voice mail, and never heard a word back. The second problem was that the water was shut off to the park to facilitate a repair at a single Mobile Home site. Yes, the entire park on a weekday morning. If we hadn't been in a hurry to get out of town, we'd have been in big trouble since we normally sleep in. If the gentleman who called us back about our reservation had mentioned the upcoming maintenance it would have changed our plans.
04/2012
rating [ 6/10 ]
Perkins is not a 'glamorous' park, but it excels at what it is. It is a place for long-term transient workers or 'snowbirds' to stay. When you are used to 'Good Sams' parks and resorts, you may be wary about staying here, but don't. It is a nice, quiet park with friendly guests and owner. The property has an RV side and a Mobile Home side. Althought there were several homesteaders (RV's with huge external propane tanks and residential refrigerators/freezers outside) they were all well kept and appear to be in good repair. There were several overflowing garbage drums around the park, but I believe the owner was busy keeping the grass mowed and just got behind. He is a nice fellow, and was very busy, allowing me to just drop a check through the mail slot when I got a chance. They DO NOT take credit cards. I wasn't bothered by the road noise, but we didn't spend much time at/around our site, and it never woke any of my family up. The water spigot has a 4-head adapter that feeds different adjacent spaces, but we never had any pressure issues. The sewer hook-up never back flowed, but did leave our downspout messy. The other issue I had was with the 50-amp service. It was just a plug and NO breaker: a cable running under the pine needles. I prayed, plugged it in, went inside, restoring the circuit breakers, everything worked, but it was a bit unnerving. The cable TV worked great, but we only watched the Weather Channel due to tornadoes in the area. No Wi-Fi but my Sprint phone and Verizon Aircard worked fine in 3G mode. There are phone company demarks at each space, so you could get a phone line and DSL if you are staying for a month or more. This park beats staying in a Wal-Mart thanks to the hook-ups and level spaces, so do not hesitate to stay at Perkins, despite its 'dated' look.
08/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
One of the more popular State Parks, and located between the City of Ocean Shores and the Quinault Beach Resort & Casino. It is an older park, but well worth the visit. All the previous reviews are accurate, but I would add a few details. 1) The Wood & Ice Truck makes a run through the park around 5p & 7p nightly. 2) The sewer connection sits about 4-8 inches above the ground, and in most cases the typical hose supports fall a bit short. Bring a few 2x4's to set on some firewood to lift it up. 3) Grocery prices in Ocean Shores run about 25% higher than those in Metro areas. 4) The trees around the sites can make it difficult to pick up satellites, and we never could get our Over-the-Air antenna to get any local channels. Not that TV really matters, because the beach is so inviting!
07/2011
rating [ 10/10 ]
This is a great park, and even though we only stayed one night, the other campers we spoke to said that they would stay the maximum time at the park, drive to a different park for 10 days, then return here; it's that popular! It sits in a bowl of sorts, where the Wenatchee and Columbia Rivers meet, but the drive to the parks entrance made my wife wonder what I'd done - we passed several industrial areas and fruit packing plants/warehouses before we turned down the entry road. The park is expertly maintained, with a polished look and fully paved sites. The leveling jacks on our rig were only needed to stop us from rocking, as our site was very even. There are some trees to help shade your site, but we sat outside listening to the Jimmy Buffett station on XM and relaxing as we chased the shade around our RV. There was just enough of a breeze for us to forgo the A/C's, and the mosquitoes only showed up at sunset, despite the large amounts of wetlands in the area. There was little noise except for the occasional powerboat and a report of the occasional train about 7pm, though we didn't hear one the night we were there. Over-the-Air TV & cellular reception was perfect, and many campers had their rooftop dishes deployed since few of the planted trees were tall enough to obstruct their signals. I had 3G on my Verizon air-card as did my wife's' T-Mo cell phone. While my Sprint EVO4g also had 5 bars of 3G, there was no 4G signal. The park is crisis-crossed by lots of bike paths that lead to the aforementioned industrial area, and the grocery and multiplex theater beyond them, but another path leads to the main drag through town, US 2, and puts you out within easy walking distance of several stores and restaurants (including the only Sonic for 100 miles). The park has a large ramp and parking area for taking your boat or PWC out on the Columbia River, and there is a swimming area adjacent to the ramp which was quite busy when we arrived. There are several museums and cultural exhibits in the area, along with plenty of shopping at local stores and the Mall across the river in East Wenatchee, so there is no issue with getting supplies. Overall, we had a great night here and look forward to getting a spot with a killer view, and a bit more shade, when we come back.
07/2011
rating [ 8/10 ]
This is a beautiful park, and the fact that it was very quiet during the July 4th weekend was really appreciated. The one thing that knocks the score down is the mosquitoes. They are thicker than flies at a garbage pit; we burned through 4 big citronella candles and two bottles of Deep-Woods bug repellent over a 4 day weekend. The beach has two parts, the lake side which was warm but rocky, and the river side which was sandier but frigid from the snow melt. The bugs were still thick, even resting 20 feet offshore. TV reception was non-existent with the antenna, since there are several mountain peaks between nearby Leavenworth and the park. We don't have a dish, but the trees kept interrupting our Sirius/XM reception. My wife & daughter used the parks showers and reported them clean, but outdated. My daughter didn't put her jeans on the stall doors hook, and they got pretty wet from the overspray. There was plenty of hot water and the structure was clean and bug free. Water pressure in the RV was fine, as was the 50A service the few hours we needed the A/C on. That night, we ran the electric heaters and they performed fine, even with both TV's and laptops running. Word of warning: The park still has part of the south campground closed due to diseased trees, so if you have a long motorhome you will not be able to maneuver around that loop. Make sure you reserve, and enter, the North campground. Finally, the park is about 30 road miles from the city of Leavenworth, and there are lots of deer and elk in the area, along with some bears. Drive at (or under) the speed limit in the area; the does like to walk down the middle of US2 at dusk, fortunately a beep of the horn drives them back into the brush.
05/2011
rating [ 9/10 ]
Another update to my prior two reviews. First note, is even though the park shows as 'Burlington', it resides in the city of Bay View, which is 1/2 way between Burlington and Anacortes (5.4 & 6.1 miles from each per my GPS). As mentioned before, the dump site is still out of commission, but a quick drive east on 'Josh Wilson Road' delivers you almost to Camping Worlds doorstep (thanks to a pair of recently completed round-a-bouts off I-5 and Old Highway 99). Our 35 foot rig was towing our Jeep Liberty and maneuvering was easy - at the posted 15 MPH... Now, back to the park. That stimulus money came in handy. The Rangers at BVSP have added 50-amp service to space 10 (and maybe others) and they have cleared out the undergrowth that was encroaching on many of the sites. All the sites have been re-graveled and are wider and more level than before. This is a big benefit, since my wife was able to maneuver our rig into position by herself (something she was concerned about doing). Unfortunately, recent budget issues will require all WA State Parks to be 'self-sufficient' in 2012, so rates will probably climb. There is also a plan to begin charging a $10 per day, or $30 per year park pass. This should not affect registered campers, but it may affect guests. Regarding the big rigs, the best sites for longer rigs (35-39') are 3-10, but now 26-29 can handle rigs up to 36' (and maybe longer) thanks to the recent improvements, but you may need to park your towed in the overflow. Bathrooms were clean and in good repair with plenty of hot water. Also, Sprint cell customers will find 5 bars, but 4G on Clear is just out of reach, being available in both Burlington and Anacortes. Verizon & T-Mo were the same as before. I do not have a Dish, but often see both fixed & portable dishes up, pointing to the south like hungry chicks waiting for breakfast... Again, make sure you have a reservation before coming here. During 1st come, 1st serve you will often find many small campers or Vanagons parked in the sites for 32ft+ rigs.
09/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
If only every RV park were like this! At $26 for Good Sam members, with full hook-ups and 50 amp, cable TV, fast free WiFi (with good signal strength), level concrete pads (about 1/2 pull throughs), a pool and top shelf dog waste bags! They have monthly rates (less the power bill) and a it was great to see rigs from a Truck Camper up to a Marathon Coach parked here. It has the added bonus of being next to the Evergreen Air and Space Museum and a great municipal airport. McMinnville is a bit of a pain to get to if you're coming from Portland (Highway 99 is a traffic nightmare) but this park is worth the trip. It very well may be the only 10 I'll ever give, but it deserves it!
09/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Everything that has been said is dead on. This is a very nice park to stay at, with a friendly staff and great proximity to Crater Lake. The ice cream at the little store is superb, and the drive to Klamath Falls if you forget something is about 90 minutes each way. My wife and I caught a cold during our trip down to Oregon, and it hit us when we got here, so we stayed inside most of the time watching DVD's (no cable and we didn't have a dish). They do have free Wi-Fi, but it is satellite and pretty limited. My Verizon Wireless aircard had 1 bar of 3G, (which my Sprint phone roamed on all the time) and my wife's T-Mobile only worked at the Rim Village in the Park. The parks laundry facilities were clean ($1.75 wash and $1 to dry) while the bathrooms were clean, they could use an update. Still, they were FREE, so you can't complain about that! The area gets DARK at night, so bring your telescope and red-lensed flashlights for some stargazing! We didn't have any problems with mosquitoes, but we were inside (sick) most of the time. We definitely recommend this place, just make sure you have everything you need before arriving!
08/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
Fort Ebey was a WW2 coastal defense gun emplacement that was stripped and given to the State of Washington. It is mid-sized with a great location. Overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca from the western edge of Whidbey Island, the sunsets are spectacular, with the Olympic Mountains to the southwest and Canada visible to the North. As said before, this is a good family park, with numerous bike and foot paths traversing the bluff and surrounding woods. It does get very windy when there is an onshore flow, and it is a great place to go para-gliding or fly a kite. The sites are well laid out, marginally level and spaced far enough apart to give good privacy. The campground is about 1/4 mile away from the gate, and one heckuva' uphill bike ride, so hopefully you are in descent shape. It is also far enough away from urban lights to break out the telescopes for star gazing. As always, use the State Parks website to check each site and utilities (all trailer sites have water & 30-amp). Do not be surprised if you get buzzed by an E/F-18 Growler or P-3C Orion out of nearby Ault Field. If you need last minute supplies, Oak Harbor is a few miles up the road. Cell coverage was good with 3 bars on my Verizon Blackberry and Sprint Evo (no 4G) and my wifes T-Mobile cell had 1 bar. Over the air HDTV reception was good, with over 14 main and auxillary channels available, but strength was in the bottom 1/3rd of the meter. A prior review said the park was 'Big Rig' friendly. I doubt that is accurate, since my 35ft Motorhome was a tight fit between trees in one section, so be aware. We didn't use the facilities at the park. My wife really loves going here, and we will most certainly return next summer.
08/2010
rating [ 7/10 ]
Like many of the Puget Sound area Washington State Parks, Larrabee is pinched in by development on all sides, but it is a jewel in its own rite. First off, I wouldn't bring anything longer than 35ft. into the park; the trees along the most of the campsites can 'bite' you (happened to brush the awning on my rig despite my best efforts). There are 50 dry sites only large enough for tents, campers or pop-ups, plus eight tent only, walk-in sites. The other 26 sites are full hook-ups, but only 5 are suited for rigs larger than 32 feet. Make sure you use the state parks website before you reserve a spot, and bring lots of good blocks. I purchased 2 sets of 'LynxLevelers' stack-able blocks to go under the tires (to supplement the 3" wooden blocks I normally use for my leveling jacks). Unfortunately, all 20 Lynx blocks barely kept the passenger side tires touching earth because the rear jacks were still fully extended and we still weren't level. Other reviews mentioned the trains. Yes, they pass along the west side of the park, but it never bothered us (we had the windows closed and A/C on at night due to the heat), but I did hear the horns sound several extra times during the evenings as people were crossing the tracks when returning from the beach. Mosquitoes were only bad at sunset, but the biggest environmental issue for me was the noise from the big bikes that ran up and down Chuckanut Drive. I didn't use the parks restroom facilities, but my daughter said they were clean, but "smelled musty because the fan was broken". The pull-through sites are 30 amp, but I did see that 2 of them had 50 amp connector for what it's worth. One final note about the park is how convenient it is to local sites. Historic Fairhaven has lots of neat shops and is the hopping off point for the Alaska Ferry System and visits to Vancouver, Mt. Baker Ski area (with the beautiful views at Artists Point) and down to Whidbey Island.
04/2010
rating [ 8/10 ]
Update from my review of last year. Thanks to some Stimulus money, the Lower Loop (by the entrance) now has 50 amp at all 9 sites. I'm not sure if they will add it to the rest of the utility sites, which already have 30 amp, but it would be a big plus since those sites were built with three sites on one of the parks power circuits (so if your neighbors are running two ACs, two TVs, and the hair dryer, you could end up with an under-voltage issue). There are still no dump sites at the park (and only the host has a sewer hookup) due to the failed septic system. You can go to dumps nearby (Camping World is only 10 miles away & it's free there), but if you take your showers in the baths instead of your coach, you can stretch your dumps out instead of daily. If you have a 40 ft plus rig, there really are only three sites that would handle your bus... but if you can afford something that big, you probably have a membership somewhere, so just make sure you have a reservation before coming here. During 1st come, 1st serve you will often find small campers or Vanagons parked in the sites for 32ft+ rigs.
02/2010
rating [ 10/10 ]
Outstanding value! We came for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and these folks had the General Store open from 5am-10am and from 1pm-8pm, when it is normally closed for the season. They also ran free shuttles (thus the higher nightly rate) 3 times in the morning and again in the evening to the Skytrain and West Coast Express stations as needed. As for the facilities: very clean baths and laundry rooms. Showers are 5 minutes for a Looney ($1 Canadian) with plenty of hot water and good pressure with a handheld shower wand. They have plenty of pet waste bags and garbage cans throughout the park. The pool, activity center and kid's playground are in good shape. The pool was closed for the season and it was too rainy to play outside during our visit. Cable TV had all the Vancouver and Seattle broadcast channels and listings available online via TVGuide.ca with the park's zip code. Wi-Fi was very reliable during the week we stayed, but it did get bogged down when the park was 2/3rd's full. The antenna was near the main power panel in our loop, and we were about 50 feet away, but we had a consistent 5.5mb signal according to Windows. When it did drop, I just rebooted and came back up fine. I only used my Verizon cell phone twice (roaming in Canada is expensive), but had 5 bars when I did. The Eagle and Chinook loops have a pretty good slope, so bring blocks for your stabilizer jacks, as our front end was airborne. A heated water supply hose and a sewage hose ramp are strongly advised. The park has heated water supply pipes, so we never had frozen pipes. Plenty of things to see in Fort Langley and lots of shopping within 10 miles. Can't find what you need, ask one of the staff. We will definitely be staying here again.
08/2009
rating [ 7/10 ]
This is not a campground like you get at a KOA, Good Sams or any number of the State Parks we have stayed at. Fishing Bridge is a base camp! It is centrally located in the park, is the only one with any sort of hookups (they are full h/up; bring spare boards to elevate your sewer hose and insulation and a 45psi regulator for your water hose). My 35ft, 3-slide class A scraped in, but we couldn't put out the awning due to the tree at our site. There is no cell coverage here from anyone: only VZ had 3G and that was at Old Faithful. Had both VZ & ATT at 1X at Canyon and Mammoth as well. XM was spotty in our spot, but worked fine in the car, we don't have satellite so relied on DVD's before collapsing from exhaustion! Bring your supplies, top off the tanks before entering the park (Bozeman, Cody, Salt Lake, Jackson) and my best suggestion is to prepare your dinners (casseroles, soups, etc...) and freeze them in dry ice in a cooler you won't use for the first 5 days you travel. Note: It cost me $50. for 30lbs of dry ice and 2 bags of regular ice, but it SAVED me a few hundred in eating 'on the way' and frustration when we got home each night. Every other review here is accurate in my opinion. The sites are incredibly tight, the showers are expensive (and far from E, F & G Loops) and your water pressure does fluctuate. The power stayed on just fine but keep the windows closed since the fumarols smell can travel far. We chatted with our neighbors, but they changed almost daily, and no one was sticking around the campground when they could be out looking at the sites. Think of FB as a storage depot instead of a campground, and you will have a kinder opinion of the site. But, all things considered, it really isn't bad.
06/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
A great WA State Park! This is our nearest park, so we have stayed here a dozen times since March 2009. The state website has correct data on the sites dimensions, and the brush between most sites gives plenty of privacy without being overgrown. Our 35' Class A navigates the park with ease, but our automatic awning hits branches in a few spaces. Technology: The parks utility sites are in two sections (1-9 & 10-30) while the rest are dry sites. 1-9 have water all year but the rest are shut off November thru late March. TV reception (all Digital) is best in spaces 1-9, but they degrade in the upper loop and breakup everytime a plane flies overhead. There is plenty of space to put the dish up. Verizon Wireless & TMobile have 5 bars and I'd expect Sprint & AT&T are similar. Staff & Site Notes: Garbage & recycles are in the upper loop and two dumpsters by the entrance. My wife & daughter prefer the camp showers instead of our RV's. They are always clean and had plenty of hot water, just stand back when they restart because the are cold for the first few seconds. Must See: I've never needed bug repellent here, despite the huge mud flats in Padilla Bay. It is really fascinating to watch the tide go out and then see miles of bay bottom. It is also a good place to fly a kite. Kids bring their bikes, despite the lack of trails on property, but there are trails nearby to ride (I'll try them soon). The playfield in the center of the upper loop is always an very active place, as long as there hasn't been a lot of recent rain.
06/2009
rating [ 9/10 ]
Another great WA State Park! We stayed in a 2 party back in site (meaning the 2 spaces have to be reserved together). We lucked into our 1/2 of the space when the 1st party cancelled the reservation for the second space (we had to call the park to reserve the open half). The state website has correct data on the sites dimensions, and there was plenty of privacy. Technology: There are two high hills blocking line-of-sight to Seattle & Vancouver, plus tons of 70+ft trees, so forget TV or Satellite. Verizon Wireless had 2 bars but my wifes TMobile had no coverage. Staff & Site Notes: The park rangers & volunteers were very friendly and were seen making regular rounds dealing with the garbage/recycles and such. My wife & daughter used the camp showers. They were clean and had plenty of hot water, just stand back when they restart because the are cold at first! Must See: Bring bug repellent! Bikes were everywhere and the trails were easy to pedal and walk. It was a great weekend at a great park.
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