The "General Chat" forum

Discussion in 'General Community Discussions' started by Webmaster, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. docj

    docj
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Messages:
    3,714
    Likes Received:
    164
    Skymessenger you have responded to a several year old post; I doubt the person who posted it is still around to read it.

    But as for the question, some Facebook RV groups have been buzzing this past week about a story from Florida in which a park asked customers to leave even though they had paid for a longer stay. To cut to the bottom line, Florida law permits this as long as the park gives the customer notice in writing that they are to leave and refunds a pro rata share of any monies paid.

    From what I've read, the law in FL doesn't specify an advance notice, just "please take your stuff and leave." The basic premise appears to be that customers stay "at the will of the management" and can be asked to leave at any time. Sort of like "at will employees" who can be let go without any particular reason being given.
     
  2. NYDutch

    NYDutch
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    129
    In general, stays at RV parks, hotels, etc., for less than 30 days are considered "at will" and require no notice to evict. Longer stays start getting into the individual state's tenant laws, where a legal eviction process must be followed with suitable notices, etc. That's why some parks require a credit check for longer stays, just as an apartment owner might. Refunds would likely be dependent on the reason for the eviction in accordance with the establishment's posted rules and policies that we agree to when checking in.
     
  3. Skymessenger

    Skymessenger
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yes, after I sent it,, then I realized it was several years back when the original post was written. Thanks
     
  4. RLM

    RLM
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,376
    Likes Received:
    154
  5. gootie

    gootie
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    campground icons have returned. Thank you
     
  6. Nineoaks

    Nineoaks
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2016
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    6
    Wally World sells a drying compound that my cousin swears by, it is not expensive. I have also heard that several pans of cat litter place in the unit will absorb moisture too
     
  7. BC Wanderer

    BC Wanderer
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    49
  8. RLM

    RLM
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,376
    Likes Received:
    154
    For the shower issue, I use a small off brand DampRid product that comes in shelf type container and is called Moisture Eliminator. It can be gotten at Dollar Tree for a buck.

    For the entire rig while in storage where there may not be electricity, you can buy the 64oz size DampRid at places like Home Depot. I do a bit of redneck engineering by securing a mess screen over a 5 gal bucket and then spread out the crystals on top. I dump the liquid and replace crystals about every 3-4 weeks.
     
  9. BankShot

    BankShot
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    691
    Likes Received:
    269
    I hadn't really paid much attention to this part of the forum until this evening. Decided to read all three pages of posts and this moisture thing grabbed my attention. Just last winter we noticed that five of the overhead cabinet doors had separated around the joints, with a couple being really "split: open. This had been a very, very wet and damp winter for us as this never happened in past ones. I talked with several RV folks about this and was told that it was excessive moisture inside the coach that was the culprit. We had them repaired and went out immediately and bought a dehumidifier. Hooked it up and ran it all night and by morning I was amazed as the amount of water that had been drawn from the air and stored in the container. Must have been at least a quart and a half or more. We used it from there on and no more problems. It will be put back into use shortly as we enter our winter season. Never would have believed so much water was present inside the coach until the dehumidifier showed it to us................ :eek:

    BankShot..................(aka Terry)
     
  10. NYDutch

    NYDutch
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    129
    Yep, back when we stored our TT's and then our coach for the winter, we ran into the same moisture related problems. We used the same Oasis dehumidifier for over 10 years to cure the problem. Now we have the heat on in colder weather of course, so there's no problems with moisture besides a few partially fogged windows on cold mornings sometimes.
     
  11. BC Wanderer

    BC Wanderer
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    49
    We have our dehumidifier with us all of the time up here on the coast. De-laminating cabinets was not my biggest concern. Mold was/is. Most RVs are pretty air tight and thus trap moisture from cooking, showering and just breathing. In the winter we can dump the three liter bucket daily. Check for mold as well as damage to anything that can hold moisture.

    Darrell
     
  12. Onemoretrail

    Onemoretrail
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    2,513
    Likes Received:
    78
    For the past 20 years, I have used dehumidifier crystals, not only in winter, but all year round. The motorhome has vent covers, so I can leave the vents wide open for better air circulation. The motorhome is kept in a storage compound when not in use, so I try to check on it every 2 weeks or so. Even though where I live is considered a dry area, in winter the moisture levels can get fairly high. We have had 3 motorhomes during this time and have never had a moisture problem inside that would cause any problems. The key was to provide as much air circulation as possible. That's why I've used Maxxair vent covers and dehumidifier crystals. It does the job.
     

Share This Page